resultless job hunt

45 posts in this topic

On 2017-4-27 07:25:35, revolutionist said:

 

Hey Meri, 

 

Yes, OSCE.  I follow the openings there as well but procurement is not really my cup of tea. How do you like working for ODIHR?

 

 

It is what it is - I tried to be as honest (in places more modest) as I could; but I will not undermine my achievements so that the profile looks more "realistic".  I worked my ass off for all of that) on the other hand, I do understand what you're saying.

 

I showed my resume to a number of IT recruiters, who liked it but had no offers at the time.. 

 

Job hunt still ongoing)) bullets getting rusty)

 

cheers everyone

 

 

I have a friend from London who managed to find a job in Berlin. From what I've seen, Frankfurt does not have a lot of English speaking jobs despite companies like Nomura, UBS, etc present here. Maybe you';d like to look at Berlin instead

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On 2017-6-21 12:33:18, moonflowerldn said:

 

 

I have a friend from London who managed to find a job in Berlin. From what I've seen, Frankfurt does not have a lot of English speaking jobs despite companies like Nomura, UBS, etc present here. Maybe you';d like to look at Berlin instead

 

I wouldn't mind Berlin at all but as of now, the hunt continues to bring not very good results. I'm still attributing this to my experience which, to a private sector recruiter or company, is pretty hard to read in terms of transferability of skills and knowledge.

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The roads in Berlin are not paved with gold.  If you arent in IT I wouldnt up sticks to come here unless you have a decent offer already.

 

Overall it seems that the main problem might be not unsderstanding german recruitment culture.  Throughout this thread I see things like, oh I didnt know I needed references, germans should know I dont need a work permit etc.  I think you should get some example applications either from friends or examples online and check everything is in order. Despite what you might think many german companies expect an application to look exactly so, cover letter, lebenslauf (that looks like a german lebenslauf, not like a US or UK cv/resume) and references, plus scans of certificates, school reports the works.  Not doing all that is, unless you are working for a startup or a hipster berlin software company more or less an instant No.

 

Dont leave gaps in your cv where you spent 6 months learning german, or looking for a job, write it in.  For some reason many germans freak out about gaps but are quite happy to read "Arbeitssuchend" in place of such a gap.

 

Next to your nationality write "work permit not required" or similar, you cant count on every HR guy knowing the rules.  Remember that recruitment is often a complex thing, and your application might get passed around internally to a few people (team lead etc) of "Fachentscheiders" who may have little or no idea about that kind of stuff and might think "hmm, sounds like it will be a pain to get a work permit, Ill just say no".

 

Possibly the most important advice has already been given.  Work out what you are or want to be.  Dont apply for jobs saying I can do everything/anything.  Say something like "I am a procurement guy" so they clearly know what you want to do and what skills you think you bring.  Make it 100% clear.  If the posts here saying an average recruiter gives just 6 seconds to each application then it has to be crystal clear in 6 seconds what job you want and what skills you bring to do that. If you dont have refreences that is likely to be taken as "my references are so bad I dont want to show them". Germans love references which need to be written on headed paper and signed.  If you dont have any, maybe ask your previous team leads if they can provide something, or at least write in the cover letter why you dont (cultural differnces where you have worked).

 

I would say that changing roles isnt half as difficult as many people here think.  However the key thing is to position yourself in the new role.  Being "open to new areas" is application suicide.  Saying I am looking a a role in X which builds upon my skills Y is normally fine. Not as good as an experienced X, but thats life, the guy who has studied and already did the job for 5 years will always come higher up the list than a newbie unless you can really sell yourself and your drive.

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On 2017-7-8 15:24:35, zwiebelfisch said:

The roads in Berlin are not paved with gold.  If you arent in IT I wouldnt up sticks to come here unless you have a decent offer already.

 

Overall it seems that the main problem might be not unsderstanding german recruitment culture.  Throughout this thread I see things like, oh I didnt know I needed references, germans should know I dont need a work permit etc.  I think you should get some example applications either from friends or examples online and check everything is in order. Despite what you might think many german companies expect an application to look exactly so, cover letter, lebenslauf (that looks like a german lebenslauf, not like a US or UK cv/resume) and references, plus scans of certificates, school reports the works.  Not doing all that is, unless you are working for a startup or a hipster berlin software company more or less an instant No.

 

Dont leave gaps in your cv where you spent 6 months learning german, or looking for a job, write it in.  For some reason many germans freak out about gaps but are quite happy to read "Arbeitssuchend" in place of such a gap.

 

Next to your nationality write "work permit not required" or similar, you cant count on every HR guy knowing the rules.  Remember that recruitment is often a complex thing, and your application might get passed around internally to a few people (team lead etc) of "Fachentscheiders" who may have little or no idea about that kind of stuff and might think "hmm, sounds like it will be a pain to get a work permit, Ill just say no".

 

Possibly the most important advice has already been given.  Work out what you are or want to be.  Dont apply for jobs saying I can do everything/anything.  Say something like "I am a procurement guy" so they clearly know what you want to do and what skills you think you bring.  Make it 100% clear.  If the posts here saying an average recruiter gives just 6 seconds to each application then it has to be crystal clear in 6 seconds what job you want and what skills you bring to do that. If you dont have refreences that is likely to be taken as "my references are so bad I dont want to show them". Germans love references which need to be written on headed paper and signed.  If you dont have any, maybe ask your previous team leads if they can provide something, or at least write in the cover letter why you dont (cultural differnces where you have worked).

 

I would say that changing roles isnt half as difficult as many people here think.  However the key thing is to position yourself in the new role.  Being "open to new areas" is application suicide.  Saying I am looking a a role in X which builds upon my skills Y is normally fine. Not as good as an experienced X, but thats life, the guy who has studied and already did the job for 5 years will always come higher up the list than a newbie unless you can really sell yourself and your drive.

 

thanks for the long post onionfish) I've literally went through all of the cultural differences that I could hear, read or receive online; I've had colleagues look at application, I've had German look at it too. You're right about identifying your role - it does help a lot; though some might think that they'll lose ground on other fields of expertise. Anyway, thanks for your advice and guidance, the hunt is strong :)

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