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resultless job hunt

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Concerning simple screening..

I prefer to have all relevant information about a candidate on my desk to make the decision whether we should invitate the person.

Imagine you have a pile of 200 files on your desk or 200 emails with an attachment.

I make three piles on my desk: "interesting candidate", "may be", "no".

In a first round I go 200 applications. So one hour.

Except the candidate looks very interesting, the application will end on the "no" pile if the file is incomplete.

Applicants have to play the game according to the rules.

Nobody has the time to ask for additional information, if the file is incomplete.

I personally like pictures since during an interview it connects the application with the applicant.

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, 3d0N said:

Keep trying and improving your german should be priority 1 if you plan to stick around. Get to B2 at least (should be possible in 1-2 months intense learning and practising every single day), you'll have much better odds if the cv/cover is in german. Needless to say the CV and cover letter need to be adjusted for every position you apply, make sure you emphasize the skills and knowledge that would make you THE BEST damn candidate for the position you apply for.

good luck

 

working on it. thanks!

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1 hour ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

Concerning simple screening..

I prefer to have all relevant information about a candidate on my desk to make the decision whether we should invitate the person.

Imagine you have a pile of 200 files on your desk or 200 emails with an attachment.

I make three piles on my desk: "interesting candidate", "may be", "no".

In a first round I go 200 applications. So one hour.

Except the candidate looks very interesting, the application will end on the "no" pile if the file is incomplete.

Applicants have to play the game according to the rules.

Nobody has the time to ask for additional information, if the file is incomplete.

I personally like pictures since during an interview it connects the application with the applicant.

 

 

 

 

 

33 minutes ago, LukeSkywalker said:

18 seconds for an application? What do you check or read in this very brief time?

 

I can relate, I've done something similar in a job a couple of years ago. Took me 2 hours for 200+ applications. Though, again, I was looking at the profile of the person and the relevant experience for the job. Not references. In international organisations' world, references would come last and not always checked, most of the times referees are called/emailed if there are two strong candidates and the recruiting board cannot come to an agreement. So I guess in Germany they always check them and it is super important?

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Do German employers call the referees? Datenschutz?

I would not give any information on the phone.

Correct me, if I am wrong.

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53 minutes ago, LukeSkywalker said:

18 seconds for an application? What do you check or read in this very brief time?

The study says 80% recruiters spend  just around 6 seconds ;) 

References: Reference 1Reference 2

 

 

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@revolutionist Seems you don't have work permit in Germany; if this is the case then its hard to get a job - thats a reality. Because a potential employer need to take a lot of extra work for you to get in.

 

You need to prove to them that your are worthy of that trouble.

 

My suggestion will be: 

1. Connect with recruiters on LinkedIn and Xing. They are your best friends in this regards.

2. Try to modernise your cv if you target tech companies. Do some online research on 'single page' resume. 

3. Create multiple cv designed and focused according to the target company. 

 

Attachment: My current cv, just for an example.

 

 

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Applicants have to play the game according to the rules.

Yes. I once worked for a company on "Joseph-von-Fraunhofer-Straße", and all applications with the address spelled wrong ("Josef", or "Frauenhofer") went on the "no" stack immediately...

 

Attachment: My current cv, just for an example.

Jesus, ask somebody to proofread that, please. First sentence "optimize development process" has to be "optimize the development process" or "optimize development processes". At some point you misspelled "embedded" as "embeded". You worked for more than two years in a German town called "Cologne" in English but misspell that as "Cologn". The sentence "Developed games and utility applications for mainly for iOS" contains one "for" too much. In the sentence "Lets have a coffee and discuss what else you want to know!" it should be "Let's". Apart from that, this sentence is basically a self-invitation, an absolute no go...

 

Terrible first impression, sorry.

 

 

 

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38 minutes ago, Shaikh Aman said:

@revolutionist Seems you don't have work permit in Germany; if this is the case then its hard to get a job - thats a reality. Because a potential employer need to take a lot of extra work for you to get in.

 

You need to prove to them that your are worthy of that trouble.

 

My suggestion will be: 

1. Connect with recruiters on LinkedIn and Xing. They are your best friends in this regards.

2. Try to modernise your cv if you target tech companies. Do some online research on 'single page' resume. 

3. Create multiple cv designed and focused according to the target company. 

 

Attachment: My current cv, just for an example.

 

 

 

franklan did a good job of proofreading for you.  I'm not so sure that German recruiters necessarily like the single page CV that's more the norm in the UK for example. 

 

I agree with you that CVs need to be adjusted depending on the particular job.  A recruiter won't want to have to imagine how previous general experience might be appropriate for the job in question.

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30 minutes ago, franklan said:

 

 

Yes. I once worked for a company on "Joseph-von-Fraunhofer-Straße", and all applications with the address spelled wrong ("Josef", or "Frauenhofer") went on the "no" stack immediately...

 

 

 

Jesus, ask somebody to proofread that, please. First sentence "optimize development process" has to be "optimize the development process" or "optimize development processes". At some point you misspelled "embedded" as "embeded". You worked for more than two years in a German town called "Cologne" in English but misspell that as "Cologn". The sentence "Developed games and utility applications for mainly for iOS" contains one "for" too much. In the sentence "Lets have a coffee and discuss what else you want to know!" it should be "Let's". Apart from that, this sentence is basically a self-invitation, an absolute no go...

 

Terrible first impression, sorry.

 

 

 

Thanks for proof reading, it was a draft version that I posted in a hurry here :) 

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18 minutes ago, emkay said:

 I'm not so sure that German recruiters necessarily like the single page CV that's more the norm in the UK for example. 

Seems they like, at least in my field of interest... :)

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7 hours ago, Shaikh Aman said:

@revolutionist Seems you don't have work permit in Germany; if this is the case then its hard to get a job - thats a reality. Because a potential employer need to take a lot of extra work for you to get in.

 

I'm an EU citizen, so i don't need a work permit.

 

 

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How old are you? Germany is very ageist, anyone over 50 can forget it, from 45 onwards it gets difficult. If you don't put your age down on the CV than that will also go against you.

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On 08/02/2017, 11:59:41, French bean said:

How old are you? Germany is very ageist, anyone over 50 can forget it, from 45 onwards it gets difficult. If you don't put your age down on the CV than that will also go against you.

 Hey, sorry missed your post. I'm 28)

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I showed my wife your CV, she is an office manager for a small company and has recruited people in the past. She thinks on the draft you posted that you are being too forward and trying to be too clever. I realise that you work in IT and maybe to get on is to show you are different but Germany is still a very conservative country. Have you spoken to any IT specialists as to what they look for in a CV when recruiting?

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As someone has already pointed out that "German employers generally prefer specialists to generalists" - aka Sachbearbeiter, providing plug and play skills in an area, (preferably with limited exit opportunity).

Larger firms almost never hire non Germans, unless he has worked for years as "extern" through a vendor. or there is acute crunch. Smaller firms are more open, and may prefer someone with general subject matter knowledge with ability to pick up work specific expertise.

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On 1/11/2017, 1:08:47, revolutionist said:

Project coordination professional with a background in business consulting and planning/executing projects addressing a wide range of security concerns for the OSCE. Key strengths include extensive global policy knowledge and ability to work in a cross-cultural environment. Detail-oriented with strong relationship management skills and ability to comprehend and develop solutions for complex technical issues.

Did you say OSCE? 

Do you know, that ODIHR office in Warsaw is now  in dire need of procurement officers, and that is an international position?

 

P.S. I do projects for OSCE/ODIHR since 1999. 

 

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