Brexit: The fallout

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On Radio 5 Live, Emma Barnett was interviewing International Trade Secretary Liz Truss about the government's "No Deal" strategy.

 

Truss said, " I don’t know the precise details of exactly what we will do, and even if I did I wouldn’t tell you”.

 

In a time of unparalled fuckwittery and lightweight, uninformed MPs, this was just the reply I was expecting, and less.

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This idea that they can't tell the media about the details is perhaps because there's nothing of substance to tell.

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3 hours ago, Chris Marston said:

Does anyone know on which basis a PM could be fined or jailed for not complying with the Benn act?

 

I just hope that if they decide to jail Johnson they don't screw it up, I'd hate to see him get out of it on a technicality.

 

Maybe he could share a cell with Tommeh, that would really be the icing on the cake...

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53 minutes ago, hooperski said:

On Radio 5 Live, Emma Barnett was interviewing International Trade Secretary Liz Truss about the government's "No Deal" strategy.

 

Truss said, " I don’t know the precise details of exactly what we will do, and even if I did I wouldn’t tell you”.

 

In a time of unparalled fuckwittery and lightweight, uninformed MPs, this was just the reply I was expecting, and less.

 

They seem to think that if they fill all the brexit roles with dimwits it will Get brexit done, hoping that the EU guys will take pity on them...

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1 hour ago, hooperski said:

Truss said, " I don’t know the precise details of exactly what we will do, and even if I did I wouldn’t tell you”.

Straight from the Trump playbook.

 

This is truly the worst timeline.

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5 hours ago, Bomo said:

NHS S1

Called the NHS BSA line this morning and they confirmed that they will pay for 6 months healthcare from Nov 1st. When I asked how would that work in practice, he said take your S1 along to the - in my case- AOK and talk to them. 

 

Not sure it will be as painless as he suggests! However, he did confirm what John G mentioned in his post...that the UK is currently in negotiations with Germany for a longer period of cover.

This started me off panicking, NHS S1 wtf? Panic over I unearthed it from a pile of important bits of paper :)

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Now still being of employable age I had to take out German Health Insurance and my wife did so first of all as she was employed here almost straight away. Whilst looking at these things and naturally looking at staying here permanently we looked at req'd contributions when we retire. For us it works out at around 150 € per month each because of all the years we paid NI in the UK. Now for those who are working here and are having to pay into the German health system, it may be worth contacting your provider to see how much it will be at retirement and not relying on the NHS because as we already know, BoJo and Co. cannot be trusted.

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French Bean, how did those calculations work, and why does it matter about the NI contributions? 

 

My limited understanding was that you would pay the required percentage of pension and other worldwide income, regardless of NI unless you have and had no German income at all, in which case it is S1 unless that goes pear-shaped.

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1 hour ago, kiplette said:

French Bean, how did those calculations work, and why does it matter about the NI contributions? 

 

My limited understanding was that you would pay the required percentage of pension and other worldwide income, regardless of NI unless you have and had no German income at all, in which case it is S1 unless that goes pear-shaped.

As I understand it, because everyone pays into a national health scheme through their National Insurance contributions it is treated in Germany as having contributed to your own health care the same as if you had paid into a German health insurance provider. On that basis you are then treated as someone who has paid into a system for the minimum number of qualifying years to benefit from the reduced health insurance contributions enjoyed by the German pensioners.

 

My wife contacted our KK and asked about the costs, we're with TKK

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19 hours ago, alderhill said:

Yes, and Leave certainly tried harder to get the spook out. It's always somewhat harder to defend the status quo while Leave could promise the moon.

 

Alderhill hit the nail on the head here. I don't think that the remain campaign was lazy or arrogant...they just had nothing to promise. It was a vote for things to stay the same. Not much else that you can add to that. However, as alderhill said, leave can (and did) promise the world. They lied through their back teeth and promised all sorts of fanciful things.

 

The vote was held during the height of austerity. The last 10 years have been a real shit time for a lot of people in the UK. The public were then asked to vote for things to stay the same or for things to change. The deck was stacked in the leave campaign's favour. Blame all the problems on the EU, bring back control, make Britain great again blah blah blah.

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And the sad thing is that those who suffered under austerity will suffer the most from leaving the EU.

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On ‎02‎.‎10‎.‎2019‎ ‎20‎:‎06‎:‎25, French bean said:

Because they won't be able to work in Europe without a Visa if no agreement is reached or their chances of being employed by a European company has been reduced or they believe that the opportunities open to them that some of their parents enjoyed have been reduced.

A couple of points:

 

1) Requiring a visa to work in a foreign country is standard practice across the world. The classic immigration countries of the US, Canada and Australia have significant immigration but would balk at the idea of freedom of movement for their neighbours, and I don't blame them. There are plenty of non-EU workers in Germany, for instance, so the UK leaving the EU should not mean that it will be impossible afterwards for Brits to work here or in other EU countries.

 

2) An end to freedom of movement will also mean that British graduates (and other workers of coure) will no longer have to compete with a never-ending supply of workers from other European countries coming to the UK. This is good for British workers, whether they're graduates or not.

 

3) The percentage of British graduates (and other workers) who move to Europe to work is relatively small (much smaller than the numbers that come to the UK), so British university students really don't have that much reason to feel "betrayed" by the Brexit vote. In other words, the average Brit doesn't emigrate to other European countries; only a minority do so.

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19 minutes ago, BMurphy said:

2) An end to freedom of movement will also mean that British graduates (and other workers of coure) will no longer have to compete with a never-ending supply of workers from other European countries coming to the UK. This is good for British workers, whether they're graduates or not.

 

Are you saying that non-UK workers can't work in the UK even with a proper visa? 

 

I don't think that going through a border (showing one's passport) will deter anyone from going where they want/need to go.

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43 minutes ago, BMurphy said:

A couple of points:

 

1) Requiring a visa to work in a foreign country is standard practice across the world. The classic immigration countries of the US, Canada and Australia have significant immigration but would balk at the idea of freedom of movement for their neighbours, and I don't blame them. There are plenty of non-EU workers in Germany, for instance, so the UK leaving the EU should not mean that it will be impossible afterwards for Brits to work here or in other EU countries.

 

2) An end to freedom of movement will also mean that British graduates (and other workers of coure) will no longer have to compete with a never-ending supply of workers from other European countries coming to the UK. This is good for British workers, whether they're graduates or not.

 

3) The percentage of British graduates (and other workers) who move to Europe to work is relatively small (much smaller than the numbers that come to the UK), so British university students really don't have that much reason to feel "betrayed" by the Brexit vote. In other words, the average Brit doesn't emigrate to other European countries; only a minority do so.

1) Just because something is a standard practice elsewhere doesn't mean that it is desirable.

2) I'm not sure protectionism is a good thing. Furthermore, I am sceptical that potential British workers are being crowded out from working in low paid jobs. As in Germany, the natives often don't fancy working, for example, as cleaners. It would be ironic if vote leave voters would be forced into such jobs because of lack of migrant workers.

3) The percentage of British students being educated by European academics is considerably, I reckon. I guess UK universities becoming less attractive as a result of the Brexit referendum is affecting them even if they do not intend to travel or work abroad.

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6 minutes ago, BMurphy said:

A couple of points:

 

1) Requiring a visa to work in a foreign country is standard practice across the world. The classic immigration countries of the US, Canada and Australia have significant immigration but would balk at the idea of freedom of movement for their neighbours, and I don't blame them. There are plenty of non-EU workers in Germany, for instance, so the UK leaving the EU should not mean that it will be impossible afterwards for Brits to work here or in other EU countries.

It is pretty easy for Canadians/Americans to visit, up to 6 months at a time with no paperwork, just a passport.  Before 9/11, you didn't even need a passport. Work in each other's countries is regulated by NAFTA (possibly USMCA if it ever comes into force), and is not too difficult. It is meant to skirt the greencard process. One downside is that it specifically disallows the time spent to be considered for naturalization purposes, as for greencard holders. Certain jobs/industries are also protected. 

 

6 minutes ago, BMurphy said:

2) An end to freedom of movement will also mean that British graduates (and other workers of coure) will no longer have to compete with a never-ending supply of workers from other European countries coming to the UK. This is good for British workers, whether they're graduates or not.

More myth than reality. Aren't British workers good enough to compete?...

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