Brexit: The fallout

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The "Irish question" of course being an English problem created in Ireland. It is a direct result of the Plantation (colonisation) of Ulster.

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14 minutes ago, murphaph said:

The "Irish question" of course being an English problem created in Ireland. It is a direct result of the Plantation (colonisation) of Ulster.

 

Is just me, murph, or is the use of the phrase "the Irish question" a bit of xenophobic elitism in and of itself? 

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5 hours ago, Kommentarlos said:

The "Irish question" raises its ugly head once again.

 

The "Irish question", as you call it, never went away, some people just chose to ignore it.

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55 minutes ago, Tap said:

The "Irish question", as you call it, never went away, some people just chose to ignore it.

 

Or rebrand it as @French bean kindly gave us an example above.

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1 hour ago, murphaph said:

The "Irish question" of course being an English problem created in Ireland. It is a direct result of the Plantation (colonisation) of Ulster.

 

Engish problem  or Scottish solution?

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37 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

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Horrifying signs at the Stop The Coup protest in Whitehall...

 

wait, wait...what did boris do to his wife?!  Is the reference to his wife metaphorical (I hope)?

 

 

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4 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

wait, wait...what did boris do to his wife?!  Is the reference to his wife metaphorical (I hope)?

 

 

 

Eton lad and Oxford man. Anything is possible...

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21 minutes ago, Kommentarlos said:

 

Yes.. Very good. Google is your friend. Back in vogue though since 2017. 

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_question

 

You didn't read that all the way to the end. It's properly called "the Irish border question". Now, if we check linguistics academic papers...  

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54 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

 

You didn't read that all the way to the end. It's properly called "the Irish border question". Now, if we check linguistics academic papers...  

 

Nope, you"ve lost me. What linguistic academic papers between 1800 and 1922 would "we" check? 

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1 hour ago, lisa13 said:

 

wait, wait...what did boris do to his wife?!  Is the reference to his wife metaphorical (I hope)?

 

 

I think he’s fathered one or two kids away from home ( as far as I know )?

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2 hours ago, AlexTr said:

 

Is just me, murph, or is the use of the phrase "the Irish question" a bit of xenophobic elitism in and of itself? 

It's only used in GB. In Ireland it's considered pretty patronising.

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Just now, murphaph said:

It's only used in GB. In Ireland it's considered pretty patronising.

 

And unfortunately with increasing frequency as this Brexit saga rolls on.

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3 minutes ago, murphaph said:

It's only used in GB. In Ireland it's considered pretty patronising.

What do Irish people call it? ( If at all ). Genuinely curious!

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Just now, john g. said:

What do Irish people call it? ( If at all ). Genuinely curious!

History and current affairs at the same time John ;-)

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1 hour ago, lisa13 said:

 

wait, wait...what did boris do to his wife?!  Is the reference to his wife metaphorical (I hope)?

 

 

Took after his Dad and played away from home. Has been married twice, dumped the first wife for the 2nd and has dumped the 2nd wife for girlfriend seen in set up photo.

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2 minutes ago, murphaph said:

History and current affairs at the same time John ;-)

??? Nice one!

Talking of current affairs- good win in the rugby for Ireland in Wales today!

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3 minutes ago, Kommentarlos said:

 

And unfortunately with increasing frequency as this Brexit saga rolls on.

Because a hard Brexit is incompatible with the United Kingdom's obligations under the GFA and instead of just admitting that, the UK's disingenuous government has resorted to calling a workaround (agreed by said government) for the UK's actions "undemocratic".

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