Brexit: The fallout

9,424 posts in this topic

Because whoever told you that does not know what they are talking about.

 

There was a customs border between the Irish Free State (later Ireland) from the moment the country ceded from the United Kingdom.

 

This customs (regulatory and tariff) border persisted until 1973 when both the United Kingdom and Ireland joined the then European Economic Community together. There remained a regulatory border thereafter until 1993 when with the creation of the Single Market all customs controls were abolished.

 

From 1969 until 1998ish you also had a militarised border with most minor crossing points being destroyed by the British Army.

 

With the GFA these last controls were abolished.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just being a bit pedantic here, murphaph, but didn´t the Irish Free State leave Great Britain? ie not the UK. The United Kingdom came into existence as a result of that ie the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. 

I think it´s one of those Trivial Pursuit questions...which State is older: the United States or the United Kingdom? The young country United States is OLDER!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No John. Ireland was a colony of Britain until 1801 when it became part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, murphaph said:

No John. Ireland was a colony of Britain until 1801 when it became part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

My apologies, then. I need some more reading up. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...and the brexit 'bonus' just keeps on building up :rolleyes:

 

https://youtu.be/5EfLqlJ6fkM?fbclid=IwAR1kDQeFkeT8xCuFvQwKSfYheBg1yZmrpzTCFwQ9NHS3HUe_FKHcT1Ne3OI

 

Quote

A no-deal Brexit would seriously disrupt the free flow of commercially valuable data between Europe and the UK, leaving companies across the finance, hospitality, manufacturing and technology sectors facing “immense” extra costs, according to a new study by University College London.

 

The report, to be published this week, says potential problems post-Brexit with data transfers have received “minimal attention” in the debate over the UK’s exit from the EU, but could turn out to be as serious to the economy as more visible issues relating to cross-border trade.

 

The study says that even if there were a Brexit deal, new rules on data transfers between organisations in the EU and the UK – currently governed by EU law – could prove hugely difficult to renegotiate bilaterally. But if there is no deal, the study warns there will be immediate and serious economic repercussions. “No transitional period would entail significant legal, economic, political and social disruption in the UK,” the report says. “The UK would immediately become a third country in EU law, and instant disruption to EU-UK data flows would ensue.”

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7. Blame it on the EU.

Maybe BoJo needs to read this excellent books about how to make good deals. I think it is called the Art of the Deal? 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's almost exactly 40 years to the day since the British Army suffered its worst defeat in a single IRA action, with 18 soldiers being murdered by 2 bombs planted at Warrenpoint Co. Down adjacent to the Republic. The IRA men detonated the bombs remotely from across the border (formed here by the Newry river) in Co. Louth. The IRA exploded one bomb as an army truck full of paratroopers was passing by. They had correctly predicted that the survivors would regroup at a gatehouse a few yards down the road where a second larger bomb was waiting for them. As the bombs exploded two civilians on the Republic side came to the water's edge to see what the commotion was. One was a local man and the other his cousin over visiting from England. The surviving paratroopers opened fire across the border (completely illegally of course) killing the Englishman. This of course was not the first time paratroopers had killed civilians in the conflict in NI.

 

On the same day just 13 miles from the border in the Republic, Lord Louis Mountbatten, members of his family and a local teenage helper were blown up by the IRA on their fishing boat.

 

It's astonishing that I am now reading about plans to send police officers from GB to assist the PSNI in the event of hard Brexit. It's the first step on a very slippery slope. 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, murphaph said:

 

It's astonishing that I am now reading about plans to send police officers from GB to assist the PSNI in the event of hard Brexit. It's the first step on a very slippery slope. 

 

I like your posts but I find this somewhat of a sweeping and unsubstantiated statement.

 

I have no information on the current capacity of any potenial Irish terrorists ( what ever they might be calling themselves). How would you know this?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hundreds of years of history and the fact a dissident republican group planted a bomb at the Fermanagh border last week in an attempt to kill PSNI officers.

 

Also the fact the Chief Constable of the PSNI has cited that Brexit and a hard border would create conditions conducive to increased recruitment by dissident republican groups.

 

A key part of the GFA was sending English troops home. Sending English police officers over is one step away from the army. It's clearly a very retrograde step in the peace process.

 

It should also be borne in mind that the British government projections say NI will be the worst hit region of the UK. This means large scale job losses, which will be replicated on the southern side of the border. That makes for a large pool of angry young men looking for something to do. That's how it was in the past too. 

 

 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see nothing wrong with your case, wish it was different, but my question regarding the scope of the potential problem remains not answered. 

 

I have mentioned before that I don't think your inflamatory posts are helpful I remain with this point.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, murphaph said:

 

A key part of the GFA was sending English troops home. Sending English police officers over is one step away from the army. It's clearly a very retrograde step in the peace process.

 

 

 

I also do not think the ease with which you interchange UK nationals with 'the English' a mature and constructive way forward. Will Scotland and Wales be excluded from this process?  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The plans reported in the Times say officers from Police Scotland and the Metropolitan Police would be deployed.

 

In Northern Ireland there is a subtle but important difference between English and Scottish. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, French bean said:

To be English in any government Uniform in NI will be dodgy.

 

But how does one tell? Will they wear a badge or something to distnguish themselves from other UK nationals?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, murphaph said:

The plans reported in the Times say officers from Police Scotland and the Metropolitan Police would be deployed.

 

But with what consequences? Source please? 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, murphaph said:

 

In Northern Ireland there is a subtle but important difference between English and Scottish. 

 

See 2 posts above.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now