Brexit: The fallout

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In 2017 James Dyson received £2.7 million in EU grants.  A year after he campaigned to leave.  Fucking greedy, money grabbing hypocrite.

 

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51 minutes ago, hooperski said:

In 2017 James Dyson received £2.7 million in EU grants.  A year after he campaigned to leave.  Fucking greedy, money grabbing hypocrite.

 

 

 

Im not sure if this is a pro or against argument for Brexit (I or II). common agricultural policy (CAP) is a complex business and Im not sure because of political views one should abstain from current facilities.  It like saying to your Bank manager, sorry, I'm against taking out a loan at 3% because he has been charged 7% on his loans for years and believed it was fair. Obviously there is a catch, and so has EU grants. 

I'm all for localisation and CAP or EU does not fit all norms, especially when islands are concerned.  IMHO Eastern Europe has for the most part, presented many opportunities for West Europe Agri to flourish. Not for the Farms, anywhere in EU,  but for Food processing and distribution businesses.  CAP is to provide a level playing field for Environment, sustainability and so called Climate Change subsidies.  While West Europe put up heavily subsidized windmills, PV farms and Bioreactors, the rest have to make do with what small acreage farms are offered by the Food chains/giants. 

 

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Brexit really does divide families.  Whenever we visit the North-West UK we try to call on my friend Glyn (the only friend I have left in UK after being away 36 years).  Glyn & I were members of a model flying club - he still is.  Glyn was freight manager for KLM at one stage & thus looked after the 9am departure from Manchester airport to Amsterdam which colleagues & I would take (there were no direct flights to Hamburg in those days).  Glyn organised my first cockpit ride (on a DC9).

Anyhow - on our last full day in UK we met up with Glyn & his wife in Buxton.  Of course the subject of Brexit came up:  his wife (having German parents) is dead against Brexit whilst Glyn is pro Brexit "Common Sense will prevail".

 

Observing various things in the UK over the years (including our standstill in security at MAN for approx 30 minutes which caused us to miss our return flight) I have my doubts about "Common Sense".

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Information from the British Goverment

 

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the German government has said that you should allow plenty of time when re-entering Germany and make sure that have you have documentation to hand that proves that you are a long term resident, such as your residence permit, Meldebescheinigung, correspondence concerning social insurance contributions and work or rental contracts.

 

If the UK leaves the EU with a deal, nothing will change until the end of 2020. In this time you can continue to travel freely in the Schengen area with your UK passport. What happens after 2020 will form the next part of negotiations.

 

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/living-in-germany?utm_source=cd70e88e-cb12-448a-80e6-6712d670a487&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=govuk-notifications&utm_content=immediate

 

 

Here some useful information from the German Home Office.  

 

What happens if there is a no-deal Brexit? Will British citizens be required to leave Germany straight away?

 

No, no British citizen will be required to leave Germany in the event of a no-deal Brexit. The German Federal Government is planning a transition period until the end of 2019. All those affected will be required to apply before the end of the transition period to the foreigners authority responsible for them for the residence permit they will require for their ongoing residency. During the transition period, UK citizens living in Germany who have up to now been entitled to free movement, and their family members, will continue to have the right of residence. Where this right of residence has provided access to social assistance benefits or child benefit, these will continue to be provided. Existing rights of access to health and long-term care insurance will remain in place.

 

During the period when no residence permit is required, UK citizens can continue to work on a self-employed or employed basis in any role. Those affected can continue to work in any occupation, regardless of where their employer is based and without having to obtain approval from the Federal Employment Agency.All those affected will be required to apply before the end of the transition period to the foreigners authority responsible for them for the residence permit they will require for their ongoing residency and to register with the residents registration office responsible for where they live, if they have not already done so. Residence will be permitted for the time between submitting an application and receiving a decision from the foreigners authority.

 

This permission also includes the right to work on a self-employed or employed basis and access to social assistance benefits.

The Federal Government would like to make it generally possible for all UK citizens who previously had the right to free movement, and their family members, to obtain a residence permit. The Federal Government is looking into creating a new legal framework for this, if necessary.

 

One of the aims will be to facilitate access to the labour market for those affected who have settled in Germany based on their right to free movement. With this in mind, the Federal Government plans to include the United Kingdom in the list set out in Section 26 of the Ordinance on the admission of foreigners for the purpose of taking up employment.

 

https://www.bmi.bund.de/SharedDocs/faqs/EN/themen/migration/brexit/faqs-brexit.html?fbclid=IwAR3UcH9fqGS_o9yU5Hzmam5llvq_UZk9YistYdxv9pkdJTzkI2aAMTrphXg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

If the UK leaves the EU with a deal, nothing will change until the end of 2020. In this time you can continue to travel freely in the Schengen area with your UK passport.

When travelling within the Schengen area (e.g. between Germany & Spain) there are no formal passport checks (immigration) at borders at all.

It is of course wise to carry your passport on such travels as it will likely be asked for by airlines, security, hotels...

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The European and Dutch Central Banks have approved a commemorative 12 Euro note to mark Brexit...

after the UK Brexit coin failed to go into mint...Trolling muchly??

 

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