Brexit: The fallout

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Compare this to the miserable turnout for the Leave March.

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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"Brexit: Germany plans to extend transition period for Brits in case of no-deal"

 

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Germany is planning to extend the grace period for Britons living in Germany in the event of a no-deal Brexit from three months to a total of nine months as uncertainty continues, The Local can reveal.

The move is one of the measures being put in place by authorities to prepare for all scenarios and to cushion the effects of the UK leaving the EU on UK nationals in Germany.

The Local put questions to Sir Sebastian Wood, the British Ambassador to Germany, and Axel Dittmann, Director for EU Institutional Affairs, Brexit and EU Coordination at the German Federal Foreign Office.

Both sides were keen to stress that safeguarding rights of Brits who had set up lives in Germany (and for EU nationals in the UK) was a priority.

“Protecting citizens’ rights was and still is the first priority for us,” Dittmann told The Local.

...

“Our very clear political objective is to ensure that all British citizens living in Germany can continue to live, work and study here,” he said.

“No British would have to leave Germany as a result of Brexit, including pensioners and welfare recipients.”

 

 

 

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Living in Germany - GOV.UK

 

Interesting section...

 

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The UK and EU have agreed the full legal text of the draft Withdrawal Agreement in principle. The agreement on citizens’ rights would allow UK nationals to stay in their Member State of residence after the UK leaves the EU on 29 March 2019.

 

The German Ministry of the Interior, Building and Community published a website with information for UK nationals in Germany on 21 December 2018.

 

In all EU Exit scenarios, UK nationals living in Germany will need to apply for a residence permit from their local Foreigners Authority (Ausländerbehörde).

 

Some Foreigners Authorities are already planning a procedure for voluntary registration/application before the UK’s exit from the EU. See our guidance on German Foreigners Authorities.

 

 

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5c9809bc62223_crashit.jpg.9feab49c3ec75b

 

The 'Revoke Article 50' petition 'crashed the parliamentary computer' sounds like some skulduggery to me...

 

Fortunately the petition is back up, with just over 5¼ million signatures 

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Just when you thought the buffoonery of Boris Johnson could not go any further.

 

D2dMop1X0AMq0IJ.png

Yep, Boris Johnson somehow has managed to compare Theresa Mays Brexit journey to that of Moses freeing his people from slavery in Egypt.

 

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14 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

Just when you thought the buffoonery of Boris Johnson could not go any further.

 

Yep, Boris Johnson somehow has managed to compare Theresa Mays Brexit journey to that of Moses freeing his people from slavery in Egypt.

 

What?? Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson?? Who went to school at the European School of Brussels?? No! :blink:

 

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Background - I'm looking to make a short visit to North-West England to (a) visit a 95 yr old aunt & (b) spend a few days visiting Lake District etc.

But we have the Brexit turmoil which I don't want to be in the middle of when it happens.

 

Thus to sum up the current situation based on this Brexit Timeline  (just before midday @ 25th March 2019):

 

1) Its still a Hard Brexit (by default) on 29th March unless Parliament votes to cancel this - so far they have not agreed on anything binding.

 

2) If parliament agrees to move Hard Brexit from the 29th March then its HB on the 12th April

 

3) Or 22nd May if the current deal is agreed to on the 3rd vote (also unlikely).

 

4) OR...

 

Does this match to current thinking?

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4 minutes ago, HEM said:

Does this match to current thinking?

 

I think thats technically correct.

 

But all it really says is that there is no reasonable way to decide when to travel until the 29th, by which time in theory things are clear, but Id guess they still wont be. 

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Just now, zwiebelfisch said:

But all it really says is that there is no reasonable way to decide when to travel until the 29th, by which time in theory things are clear, but Id guess they still wont be. 

For instance the EasyJet web page (they fly direct HAM<=>MAN) states that they will continue to fly after Brexit.

Their English-language website gives advice on travel from viewpoint of a UK citizen travelling from the UK - where they rise the issue of health insurance (not an issue as we have ADAC cover) but also whether a UK driving license will be valid in the EU.  Which leads to the converse question of whether my EU/German driving license will be valid in UK.  However its seems that there is no issue.

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https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D2dMop1X0AMq0IJ.png

 

So I guess we can safely assume that if this ham faced buffoon gets the top job, the country will be in the wilderness for 40 years.

Moses also said " No lusting over your neighbour's house, or wife or servant or maid or ox or donkey. Don't set your heart on anything that is your neighbour's".

"Let my people go, that they might serve me"  The Brexit debacle is all about me. (Boris)

The man is nothing but rhetoric and soundbites, he has a shameful record as Mayor of London. Smoke and mirrors.

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6 minutes ago, Wulfrun said:

 

 

Actually, Boris is an immigrant, born in New York, USA

 

 

Actually he isn't.   Yes he was born in the US but as his parents were both British and living in the US then at birth he had both British and American citizenship.

 

The oxford dictionary defines immigrant as 

 

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A person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country.

 

Therefore, when he came to the UK for the very first time it wasn't a foreign country as he already had citizenship.  He had simply never been there before!

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, HEM said:

Background - I'm looking to make a short visit to North-West England to (a) visit a 95 yr old aunt & (b) spend a few days visiting Lake District etc.

But we have the Brexit turmoil which I don't want to be in the middle of when it happens.

 

Thus to sum up the current situation based on this Brexit Timeline  (just before midday @ 25th March 2019):

 

1) Its still a Hard Brexit (by default) on 29th March unless Parliament votes to cancel this - so far they have not agreed on anything binding.

 

2) If parliament agrees to move Hard Brexit from the 29th March then its HB on the 12th April

 

3) Or 22nd May if the current deal is agreed to on the 3rd vote (also unlikely).

 

4) OR...

 

Does this match to current thinking?

 

My understanding is that a "hard Brexit" can only occur on 12 April at the earliest as the EU has now granted an extension to the Article 50 process until at least that date, whatever happens (i.e. whether or no the WA is approved by Parliament in the meantime or not). 

 

I believe that an EU member state only ceases to be one at the point at which the Article 50 process (the period designed to agree a WA) ceases to apply (defined in EU law as being the date on which the WA comes into effect OR 2 years from receiving notice of the intent to leave OR after an extension period agreed unanimously by the EU Council in agreement with the member state).

 

What the member state sets out in its own domestic legislation regarding exit dates is - in light of this - actually meaningless. March 29th ceased to have any meaning as an exit date once the EU Council - with the UK - agreed an extension, as was undertaken last week.

 

Only once the Article 50 processes ends as set out above do the EU Treaties cease to apply to that member state (irrespective of whatever they choose to put into domestic legislation in the meantime).

 

The UK govt seems to be planning to amend the date in domestic legislation to cover up this (now) mismatch between the dates by means of a statutory instrument in any case.

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