How to get German Citizenship and retain (dual) US Citizenship

604 posts in this topic

Thanks for your advice :D but adopting is not an option!

 

Anyway, stay safe and healthy

 

Cheers

 

Paulaner

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20 hours ago, paul.aner said:

Thanks for your advice :D but adopting is not an option!

 

Anyway, stay safe and healthy

 

Cheers

 

Paulaner

 

Did your spouse manage to identify any exceptional circumstances? Just curious.

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I emailed the U.S. Consulate in Frankfurt to get details on the costs and process of renunciation in writing. The auto-reply contained the following:

 

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How do I renounce my U.S. citizenship?  At this time, renunciations are on hold per Department of State policy. Once we are permitted to begin processing renunciations, we will email you to schedule an appointment.  Start by clicking here to find out what documents and information are needed. Once you have collected the documents, email them to us at FrankfurtPassports@state.gov to start the process.  

 

That should make our argument easier, right? At least I'd say this is an additional unzumutbare hardship, especially since they're not giving a date when they can process applications again... Does anybody know what the reason for this might be?

 

And thinking about adoptions: Maybe I should get my parents to adopt me since I've gotten German citizenship through them once before! I lost it "voluntarily" when I took on  U.S. citizenship. Now I am trying to get the German one back without losing the U.S. citizenship... So this is why I am here! (Before you ask: I got my U.S. citizenship before it was possible to petition the German government to retain the German citizenship - Beibehaltung. That only became possible about a year later... My crystal ball had malfunctioned...)

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20 minutes ago, RavenB said:

Before you ask: I got my U.S. citizenship before it was possible to petition the German government to retain the German citizenship - Beibehaltung. That only became possible about a year later... My crystal ball had malfunctioned...

What year was that?

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I don’t want to get too excited just yet, but the SPD and Greens both have allowing dual citizenship as part of their platforms. We’ll see how it works out, but there’s now a very dim light shining at the end of a very long tunnel…

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Hello everyone, I've followed this forum for a while now and it's helped me out a lot attaining the dual citizenship. 

 My story on how I've gotten the approval for dual citizenship. I went the loophole route with the renunciation fee. I applied first in NRW were my caseworker didn't have any idea how the process was with keeping the American passport. He said I must give it up, I showed him all the documents from online etc about the cost and it being too high. He then said that my wife makes to much money. He didn't calculate anything he just said no. So I decided to change my address to where my wife parents live in Niedersachen which I have a better chance of keeping the american passport because of be working there for the past previous 6 years. When I applied for the passport in Niedersachen it was an easy process. It just took sometime for the background check to come back. Once he received that he asked my for my last 3 months pay stub from me and my wife. My working contract and an official letter from the embassy regarding the cost of the renunciation fee. After all this was handed in I got my letter that my application was approved.

 

Im a professional basketball player and our contracts are usually 8-10 months at a time which mean I wasn't able to apply for the passport using  the 6-8 years time frame even though I have B2 language course. Im here working since 2012. which I thought I could apply for the passport after 6 years with the B2, but  I was able to apply once I was married for 3 years. I hope this helps everyone and you have any questions feel free to ask.

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Watching the Berlin Abendschau tonight, they had some Syrians who had managed to pull together complete documentation for German citizenship in just 6 years (pretty admirable I would say, I took about 9 years before I was ready). Now they are trying to take the first key step, which is to hand over their documentation. They were told that it might take more than a year to get an appointment.

 

This is the appointment where they do a quick check to make sure that you are handing in everything they asked for (and all copies and translations). I didn't catch which Bezirk/district they are dealing with, but man, that is awful.

 

FYI: I had my initial appointment in 2018, then took a year to finally submit all documentation for my family (I wasn't in that much of a hurry) and had my document intake in May 2019. That was a bit of a challenge to get the appointment for that, since you had to wait around for them to offer appointments automatically at 8 am or so, then you had maybe 5 seconds to sign up for an appointment before the opportunity was gone until the following week. We had two people running multiple browsers at once, waiting for the appointments to open up, and then you had to be quick. I think it was perhaps the third week that we managed to get the appointment.

 

Still waiting for the citizenship certificates 28 months later, but I guess it could be a lot worse. In any case, it's hard to believe how terrible the bureaucracy functions in Berlin. And how it never seems to get any better.

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On 9/29/2021, 3:24:33, Doglola said:

this forum ... helped me out a lot attaining the dual citizenship. 

I went the loophole route with the renunciation fee. I applied first in NRW were my caseworker ... said that my wife makes to much money.

 

when I went through this in Sachsen at the start of the process a supervisor said it was just the applicant's income at issue, but then a year into the process the Amt said they were asking for a Ministerium to make a decision on whether or not to count spouse's income.  In the end, I succeeded on grounds other than the renunciation fee and I never learned what or if Sachsen decided about counting spouse's income.

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There is a new green member of parliament who ran for national office after the right wing killings in Hanau. She is an Ethiopian by birth and naturalized, with some reluctance, in Germany.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/05/world/europe/germany-black-woman-bundestag.html

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Since September’s election, there have been negotiations to form a center-left governing coalition that would include the Social Democrats and Ms. Tesfaiesus’s Green Party. If that coalition takes power, one of Ms. Tesfaiesus’s goals would be the removal of some barriers to naturalization — like dual citizenship restrictions — that prevent millions of people from voting and keep German politics from reflecting the country’s ethnic and racial diversity.

I don't think it will be a magic wand for us Americans who would like German citizenship but don't want to give up US and don't meet the exceptions. But is is a step in the right direction. And a smart non native German in Parliament has to be a good thing. As she points out, 25% of Germany has 'Migrationshintergrund' and the sausage eaters need to wake up to that fact (note she did not call the 75% of Germany born Germans sausage eaters in the interview).
 

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3 hours ago, mako1 said:

As she points out, 25% of Germany has 'Migrationshintergrund'

 

You may be surprised by how many ethnically German people are counted as having Migrationshintergrund.

Anyone who has a parent who was born outside Germany, has to mark the box  "Migrationshintergrund" in the census.

This includes people who have at least one parent who was a (Spät-)Aussiedler, i.e. a parent who is ethnically German, but who moved to Germany after 1950: https://www.destatis.de/DE/Themen/Gesellschaft-Umwelt/Bevoelkerung/Migration-Integration/Glossar/migrationshintergrund.html

 

And since there were German settlements (reaching back hundreds of years) in a lot of places outside the present borders of Germany, that's quite a few.

Between 1950 and 2016, 4.5 million of ethnic Germans moved back to the land of their ancestors: https://www-bpb-de.translate.goog/nachschlagen/zahlen-und-fakten/soziale-situation-in-deutschland/61643/spaet-aussiedler?_x_tr_sl=auto&_x_tr_tl=en&_x_tr_hl=en-GB&_x_tr_pto=nui 

--> these 4.5 million and all of their children are part of the Migrationshintergrund group.

 

So you could have someone who was born in Germany, who is 100% ethnically German, all of whose ancestors lived in "German" towns, attended German schools, spoke German, were raised and lived in German culture all their lives and that person will still count as having "Migrationshintergrund".

--> these 25% have to be taken with a grain of salt, you need to know the underlying definition.

 

3 hours ago, mako1 said:

and the sausage eaters need to wake up to that fact (note she did not call the 75% of Germany born Germans sausage eaters in the interview).

No, you did.

 

So, as you see, there are "sausage eaters" also among those who have Migrationshintergrund (on paper).

We're German, after all.

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If anyone here is waiting for their naturalization application to be processed in Pankow, Berlin, Berliner Zeitung had a related article a few months ago:

https://www.berliner-zeitung.de/mensch-metropole/einbuergerung-wer-in-berlin-deutscher-werden-will-braucht-viel-geduld-li.174392

 

They talk about waiting up to two years from submission, but I have now been waiting for 30 months with nothing in particular holding up the application other than "lack of staff" (angespannte Personalsituation).

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On 11/5/2021, 10:48:16, DoubleDTown said:

 

when I went through this in Sachsen at the start of the process a supervisor said it was just the applicant's income at issue, but then a year into the process the Amt said they were asking for a Ministerium to make a decision on whether or not to count spouse's income.  In the end, I succeeded on grounds other than the renunciation fee and I never learned what or if Sachsen decided about counting spouse's income.

 

What other grounds! Please enlighten me, I want dual citizenship, too!

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Apparently there are problems with birth certificates too. Some Berliner Bezirke (Boroughs) issue them immediately, others take many weeks.

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