Over age 30 Student Insurance Options

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I'm a recently arrived 31 year old American who will start a 2-year masters degree in Munich in October (I have prior insurance coverage through the end of September). I have a question about insurance starting in October. I've researched this a bit, but many of the posts I've found are old or fragmented so I could really use an external validation of my understanding or a correction if I'm wrong. I'd also love any additional thoughts anyone has.

 

As I understand it, my having arrived in Germany over age 30 means I'm not eligible for the public insurance and must buy insurance through the private market. Either that or I've been told that I might still be able to apply to the public insurance but for staying as little as a few years at my age I'd be better off with private. I'm not sure which of those is true but either leads me to think private insurance is what I need.

 

I've struggled a bit to find options for private insurance though. First, the Studentwerk site for Munich links to https://portal.versicherungsdienste.de/dsw-studenten-kv as the option they have negotiated for those like me. That has two levels of insurance, but the coverage seems rather poor, particularly at the basic level (even checkups and immunizations aren't included). It has limited non-German coverage meaning travel (e.g. trips home) could require additional insurance.

 

The forum at https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/155506-health-insurance-for-age-over-30/ pointed me to an alternative option (https://www.mawista.com/en/health-insurance-for-foreign-nationals-in-germany/health-insurance-for-students/) which seems better (e.g. one version of it includes foreign travel for up to 6wk/yr), but has some other strange holes in coverage. Not knowing what's typical for the German market though I'm unsure which coverage level is common or low or high.

 

At this point I'd normally find a third or fourth option and do a simple cost/benefit analysis, but all the other options I find seem to be public options, which I am presumably not eligible for, or their sites are all in German (mine isn't good enough to read detailed health insurance information yet) and plans seem to be focused on working people (are those plans applicable for my situation? If not, what plan type is?). Is there a marketplace somewhere that could help me sort through this? Are there other plans anyone can recommend? Thoughts on things I should make sure are covered or can ignore missing coverage for? (e.g. dental and vision? Typically included or paid separately here as in the US?) Also, I read something about needing to verify German eligibility for any plan I pick; details on that?

 

I'd very much like to do my due diligence here before making a choice but my research so far has left me without a final answer or a clear path for further research and with lots of conflicting information; any help anyone has on how best to do so is much appreciated!

 

 

Followup Note: After writing this, another resource I'd contacted responded validating my ineligibility for public plans and suggesting http://www.care-concept.de/sprachschueler_eng.php?vmnr=0036050000&mail=patrick.schlegtendal@deutscheinsurance.com&navilang=eng instead. Adding it to the discussion here in case anyone has experience with any of the three options I have found so far.

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As I understand it, my having arrived in Germany over age 30 means I'm not eligible for the public insurance and must buy insurance through the private market. Either that or I've been told that I might still be able to apply to the public insurance but for staying as little as a few years at my age I'd be better off with private. I'm not sure which of those is true but either leads me to think private insurance is what I need.

 

 

Both of the above is nonsense and might derive from someone trying to sell you a private insurance (and earn more commission) no matter what at worst, or having no real professional know-how at best.

 

1. if you truly enter a Master study program at a state recognized university in Germany, you are fully eligible to enter the public health insurance even if you are older than 30 years old. The difference is this: below the age of 30 you can get the cheap student tariff at around 70-80 EUR per month, over the age of 30 you have to have the min. normal rate for premium payments at around 170 EUR per month.   Though the difference may sound steep for many, it is usually still the best and also the least expensive option. I would strongly advise you to join a public insurance or have one of the Toytown registered brokers help you with that.

2. Apart from the fact that normal private German health insurance companies have little to no interest in "poor" students regardless of their age, going private does not really make sense for a student. If you get married, start a family while still in Germany, you'll be so much better off with public health insurance. if after you finished your master degree you'll start a very well paid job in Germany and have the option to opt out from public insurance and join private health insurance later in life, it will be early enough then and you'll keep your options open by remaining in public insurance until then.

 

Cheerio

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Thanks so much for your responses! And the jump from 70-80/month to 170/month squares with the conversations I've had with German friends about their situation.

 

Two questions though. First, I talked to one AOK representative who was at school for a student deal and he told me I wasn't eligible. That's a public option as I understand it; are you saying he was speaking only about the student deal and that I could still join for the normal price? Another resource I reached out to told me that at my age I "can not apply for statutory health insurance" which I took to mean the same thing basically. If I am in fact still able to join, how do I apply?

 

Second, the three options I have links to above all show private insurance in the vicinity of 70-80/month for me, and for student versions their price can be as little as half that for the first year. Based on your recommendation I should skip those three or other comparable choices in favor of the public option at more than double the price? I may well stay in Germany for a few years past my degree, but I'm not certain I'll stay for life at this point. Is there a meaningful benefit advantage to the public option that would play out in five years or less? Or am I paying double just for the potential long term advantage I'd have if I decided to stay here permanently? That seems a lot of extra money to pay for basically a gamble; are there other reasons I should prefer the public plan?

 

 

Thanks for the help either way; this is good to learn!!

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I'll get back with you either tonight or tomorrow...

 

Cheerio

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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2 hours ago, Starshollow said:

1. if you truly enter a Master study program at a state recognized university in Germany, you are fully eligible to enter the public health insurance even if you are older than 30 years old. The difference is this: below the age of 30 you can get the cheap student tariff at around 70-80 EUR per month, over the age of 30 you have to have the min. normal rate for premium payments at around 170 EUR per month.  

 

Are you sure?  I thought §5 Abs 1 Nr. 9 only applies to students under 30 and I've never heard of a recently arrived student receiving an extension. 

 

Furthermore, a foreigner who has not been previously insured in the EU is not eligible for a freiwillige Versicherung. 

 

AFAIK the only way for the OP to obtain public health insurance is if he finds a sozialversicherungspflichtige Beschäftigung. 

 

However,  I would be interested if you knew another option. :)

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@engelchen : we apply Nr. 13 in this case, as nachrangige Pflichtversicherung. So far we never had problems with that with the public insurances we work together...

 

Cheerio

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Either way, this leaves me to the best of my knowledge now either unable to apply for public insurance or preferring private even if I can get public. Right? Any info to the contrary?

 

And any suggestions for other private options?

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On 23.9.2016, 17:14:12, TS said:

Either way, this leaves me to the best of my knowledge now either unable to apply for public insurance or preferring private even if I can get public. Right? Any info to the contrary?

 

And any suggestions for other private options?

 

 

No, you can get into public insurance via "nachrangige Pflichtversicherung". Takes a bit more effort, but it is possible. Just that you have to pay the same normal rate for low-to-no-income members at around 170 EUR p.m.

 

Cheerio

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Got it; thanks! In that case I think I'll stick with a private option; cheaper and easier.

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My understanding is that as a foreign national with pre-existing conditions, over 30, and not from the European Union, I would only be eligible for private insurance which would charge me a huge fee, approximately 700 Euros a month, for my entire stay as a student.  You would think that a country so embarrassed over its mistreatment of "nutzlose Mitesser," as the disabled were called, during the Nazi Era, Germany would be reluctant effectively to exclude foreigners with a pre-existing condition from studying there. 

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15 minutes ago, Loewen said:

My understanding is that as a foreign national with pre-existing conditions, over 30, and not from the European Union, I would only be eligible for private insurance which would charge me a huge fee, approximately 700 Euros a month, for my entire stay as a student.  You would think that a country so embarrassed over its mistreatment of "nutzlose Mitesser," as the disabled were called, during the Nazi Era, Germany would be reluctant effectively to exclude foreigners with a pre-existing condition from studying there. 

Hello Loewen! Where do you get this magical figure of 700 euros a month from???

Your second point: great mentality at work there...jeez...what has the modern German health system got to do with your Nazi story? I don´t normally like to write like this but, in your home country, how are foreigners with pre-existing medical conditions treated? Fire away!

By the way, I´m not German so no unnecessary " guilt shit " on my part. ( Not that I think a modern German should have ANY guilt complexes about that terrible time--ridiculous collective guilt nonsense ).

 

PS: the system is NOT excluding FOREIGN students with disabilities/pre-existing conditions from studying in Germany. The system is massively complex for everyone..THAT is an issue the Germans should be looking at. 

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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2 hours ago, john g. said:

in your home country, how are foreigners with pre-existing medical conditions treated? 

 

In Canada we make foreigners undergo medical exams at their own expense before we issue immigration permits in an attempt to prevent freeloading by foreigners with pre-existing conditions. ;)

 

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Ah, so the OP is Canadian..didn´t look! By the way, I didn´t know your information! Silly me! OP: over to you?:D

 

Edit: Oh, American,,,

 

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/profile/306200-loewen/

 

So, Loewen..we can carry on. How about if an over-30 year old Sri Lankan student wants to study in the USA and has cancer? What are the rules re insurance? I have no idea..do you?

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1 hour ago, Loewen said:

You would think that a country so embarrassed over its mistreatment of "nutzlose Mitesser," as the disabled were called, during the Nazi Era, Germany would be reluctant effectively to exclude foreigners with a pre-existing condition from studying there. 

Are you really contemplating to study in Germany? What's wrong with studying in Canada? 

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1 hour ago, franklan said:

Are you really contemplating to study in Germany? What's wrong with studying in Canada? 

 

He would have to pay.

 

Quote

If you're a Canadian citizen studying in Canada, you can expect to pay an average of CA$6,000 (~US$4,534) per year for both undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Average tuition fees in Canada for international undergraduate students start at about CA$14,000 (~US$10,730) per year.

 

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I know that Canada has discriminatory health regulations for foreigners seeking to immigrate, since I was delayed myself by this rule, and was only able to be admitted after the rule was partially liberalized in 2003 to allow immediate family members to enter even with pre-existing conditions.  So you don't need to remind me of this, especially in such a profoundly rude way. 

 

I don't care that other countries, or Germany in another era, also discriminate or have discriminated against people because of non-communicable diseases, since the generality of any evil does nothing to excuse its existence in any one place. For those who don't know, Germany used to provide essentially free healthcare to all foreign students, costing about 150 DM per semester, before Germany came to embrace the viciously cruel reforms of neo-liberalism.  So if it was once possible not to discriminate against the sick, such discrimination now should not be necessary, especially since Germany is now more prosperous than it was when healthcare was nearly free and always non-discriminatory.

 

The cost of 700 Euros per month was cited on another website as the maximum private insurers are allowed to charge for those with pre-existing conditions, but it may not be up to date.

 

So my question still stands, can anyone give me clear information on the insurance rules relevant to this issue?  I've written to several universities, but they don't give any useful information.

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not sure why my prior contribution was apparently removed...did not know we have a PC-police here on Toytown nowadays.

 

Anyway, the main message remains the same, @Loewen - the way you started here with your opinionated attacks and nonsense, nobody is going to help you with your inquiry (anymore). Start looking up the following German proverb as a language lesson: "Wie man in den Wald reinruft, so schallt es heraus!"

 

Cheerio

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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@Starshollow

 

Your comments in various posts regarding public insurance seem to resonate with what I believe should happen despite all the advice I get to the contrary from people I have been trying to reach for clarity.

 

I am 38 and so is my spouse and we are both students in Germany. We are from a non EU country and are here on a long stay Study visa. I recently applied to AOK for a public insurance along with my family. We cleared the obvious requirements like having a previous insurance for more than a year in our home country.

 

The process to get a residence permit here is a bit step by step i.e you get a D-visa valid for 6 months first and then you apply for a residence permit along with proof of local insurance.

AOK sprang a surprise on us by demanding a residence permit for 12 months and cited the lack thereof as a reason for rejection. Have you encountered such a situation before, because what they are asking is impossible to provide for anyone, primarily because the Auslanderbehorde process does not work that way.

 

Suggestions/advice welcome!

 

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