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I'm looking for traditional German recipes

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My German husband generally doesn't like my style of cooking although he's very polite about it and he cooks for us often. Having said that, his German cooking is all very much limited in variety. I know that German cuisine often gets a bashing though I do remember that my German Oma used to cook some amazing meals. Sadly, due to my mothers disinterest in cooking, none of Oma's recipes have passed down the generations.  

 

I'd love to surprise my husband with something German that I've cooked without the recipe coming from his mother :blink:.  Does anyone have any great recipes to share? Or, give me a clue of meal names that I can google.  

 

Many thanks

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Hi Emkay,

 

 

Quote

[...] though I do remember that my German Oma used to cook some amazing meals. Sadly, due to my mothers disinterest in cooking, none of Oma's recipes have passed down the generations.

  

 

You might want to take a look at this, this is the standard book used (in Germany) to teach young ladies how to cook (in the last century):

 

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Oetker_Schulkochbuch

 

Getting an edition from the late 1950ies, 1960ies or early /1970ies should be easy:

 

https://www.booklooker.de/B%C3%BCcher/Angebote/titel=dr.+oetker+schulkochbuch?lid=1

 

Another recommendation is "Das praktische neue Kochbuch" by "Gertrud Oheim". Was a standard book to be found in 1950ies kitchens in Germany. Just watch out that you don't get one that has the Sütterlin-font!

 

As I have both of these I can send you an example scan/picture, if you have a specific recipe in mind.

 

The largest German recipe site that I know of is http://www.chefkoch.de. The link Uncle Nick has posted is certainly nice, but the recipes seem to be very "americanized" and all measurements are american, too (e.g. 1/2 pound of X and 8 fl. oz. of  Y, which isn't that much fun when your kitchen has metric equipment).

 

The cool thing about chefkoch (example of a recipe here) is the fact that all users can upvote/downvote recipes, so you as a reader get a hint how good/bad one recipe is...

 

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I love chefkoch.

 

If you're ok with regional specialties, I really like the recipes from Servus magazine (bavarian edition)

 

but of course not being bavarian, I can't claim they are really authentic - no idea.

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Thanks all so much for the advice.  @franklan, great idea to get an old cookbook.  I rummaged around our book collection and found a 2001 version of the Dr Oetker Schulkochbuch though it's very modernized.  I did find this 1950s classic although there aren't any recipes  other than jam making. All the photos depict only women doing household jobs and how to please husbands ?

 

image.jpeg.72d2496784ba97778e3973d2757b1

 

I know what you mean about the old font. I absolutely can't read old German.  

 

Any actual names of German classics would also be very much appreciated.  We manage to make good Rouladen, Hackbraden and Knödel though that's about it. Whilst my husband and daughter are keen meat eaters, any suggestions of non meat recipes? 

 

Many thanks again.

 

 

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I like Krautsalat, the German/Bavarian version (and ancestor) of coleslaw.

Real Germans however don't add the hot peppers. ;)

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Both of those recipes look great...thank you. 

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Bratkartoffeln!!! :)

(Fried potatoes German style, heavy on the calories but tasty.)

 

Bratkartoffeln are a sort of German aphrodisiac - men swarm towards you instantly. :D

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I find I  have  up-dated and up-spiced  the German recipes I make.  Thus, Koenigberger Klopses have become  more lively with some curry mix added!

Chicken Fricasse is more  A La King! And   they are more appreciated by   partner.

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see I make bratkartoffeln without a lot of oil.  Some, yes, but I use a non-stick pan and everything seems to crisp really nicely using a tablespoon max.  i hate it when they're so greasy!

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or chop apples, mix with a wee bit of sugar and cinammon, roll in blätterteig, slice into 5 cm pieces and bake at 200 til done.  So easy.  So good.

 

why did I make japanese lunch?!?!

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I make spätzle using a board and knife - you flour the board, put a blob of dough on it, then sort of flick pieces off with the knife into the water...the shape is different but still tastes great.

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oh yes I am a fan of sahne-herring, from any store, served on anything.  homemade "hausfrauenart" or premade...it's a staple.

 

though I've never had it with raisins...interesting

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