English-speaking driving schools in Munich

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I must agree with LFF, The theory test should not be taken lightly. There are about 60 mock test papers each with 30 questions, but some questions are just repeated. The good thing is that the actual questions you'll get are going to be one of the above 1800 so it wont be a total surprise.

 

What I did was I did all the 60 papers and marked out the ones that I got wrong and repeated the cycle but this time only doing the ones I got wrong the last time and repeated that till I got all the questions right, and on the day of the exam I got up early and did another dash through the papers.

 

My advice to anyone who wants to do it is get the appoinment for the practical test *after* you pass the theory one, and do take the theory exam seriously.

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So I don't get it... the test is way hard (sounds 100x harder than any state DMV in the US)... YET if you have an Arizona (or a few other states as well) DL then you can exchange it with no written or driving test. Here's the strange part... Arizona has the worst drivers in the US (which defacto means the world)... because of all the old folks there the test is basically are you blind, can you tell me what those four round things on the car are call... good here's your license.

 

Sounds like it would be cheaper to fly to Arizona, rent a apartment for a month, get a AZ license and trade it in. :blink:

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I just got my drivers license finally yesterday after a long process. The theory test is really hard. You dont have to think or anything, just memorize a huge amount of tedious detail. I had to put a lot more time into it than any uni exam I have ever passed. And even then I only just passed.

 

Driving test I thought would be easy, as I had been driving already for over 10 years. But nope, it was even harder than the theory, BECAUSE of all the bad habits I had picked up. If my only driving experience had been a few hours with an instructor I would have found it a lot easier. I failed the first time driving normally, severley underestimated how picky they are. And the brakes, clutch, size of the driving school car was vastly different to mine, which caused a few embarassing difficulties too. Had to do about 5 hours worth of lessons with the instructor to unlearn my bad habits, and learn all the driving test style of driving, with the head turning and looking at the right mirrors at the right times, and both hands on the wheel etc..

 

Just passed it the second time though, yesterday :) All up it cost me around 700 Euros :( Still pissed off that certain countries can simply swap it over, and others have to do the stupid tests...

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I went to the same school as LFF. They were great I have to say.

 

The theory test is nasty...don't underestimate it. Astonishingly, I managed to pass it with no mistakes and the first time too but need ed to take a day off work beforehand to memorize, memorize and memorize some more, as many of the questions involved zero logic and referred to bizzare nonsensical situations.

 

Like LFF, I'd also recommend taking the practice part slowly whilst concentrating on getting the stupid theory part out of the way. (At Schlappner the theory evenings were 2x a week and we needed to do 14 in all.)

 

Good luck with it all. :)

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I also thought of doing an intensive course at home (Northern Ireland) but I've heard that you still have to do tests in Germany (after a year or something) in order to transfer the license. Also, in NI you get a restricted ® license for 9 months or so (at least they did 10 years ago). Could I drive with this in Germany or get an international license with this R license? Thanks

Tara

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If you already have an EU license, a new German license is not required. If you have any possibility to do your license somewhere else (ie-Poland, Czech, Slovenia, etc) you can save thousands of €. I know right across the boarder in Poland there are companies that specialize in courses for residents of Germany. These courses are only in German though. I would check around to some other countries and see about courses. It may be cheaper if you go outside the city as well into a smaller town

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Taking the theory bit seriously is one thing, but is it REALLY obligatory to actually sit though hour of bloody lessons?!?

I learnt at an early age to pay no attention whatsoever in any classes, as reading the book was a darn sight quicker, and for me, gets better results to be frank. Surely this is just stuff to memorise and regurgitate at the exam, there is no concet to grasp or anything atall difficult. I am dreading the idea that I will have to go to effing school between 8 and 10PM every week, and cannot for the life of me imagine that I will learn anything that a book could not tell me.

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You may not learn anything in the classes... but you at least need to show up,

so "The Man" knows you've attended these classes.

 

Some of the shadier driving schools will say you've attended the classes

if you throw some cash their way.

If there's one thing worse than sitting through driving license theory,

it's teaching it for the umpteenth time ... so they are happy enough to

make some shortcuts.

 

Of course... finding a school that does this won't be easy in Toytown.

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Some of the shadier driving schools will say you've attended the classes

if you throw some cash their way

Well, I offered the driving school a bung last night, and it was a no go. Fucking unreal. The instructor was informed I was English, and said that was fine, she and her husband spoke English, the exam was available in English etc. What actually transpired was rather different, and I was lectured on the fact that if I live in GErmany, I should expect everything to be German.

Fair point, but when one has made a choice on a school based upon their statements of how they could easily cater for a student who would not speak German, it seems a little odd.

 

As the offer of a bung was not readily accepted, I tried the next step, intimidation. I am not at liberty to name the school here, but if you see a news story about a firebombing, its that one...

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You might also consider a two week learn to drive holiday in

England or Ireland then convert this licence into a German one.

Sorry I do not have any links but I have heard it is a good idea,

and cheaper.

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I learnt to drive here, the theory lessons are mandatory unfortunately as is the first aid course, I just used to try to stay awake through the lessons. I don't think anyone takes them too seriously that is probably why they weren't so interested in doing them in English, I would look at it as an oportunity to improve your german in a driving related way.

 

You can learn everything you actually need from the practice papers in a couple of evenings, they are simply rote learning don't think about it just keep going through them.

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I also thought of doing an intensive course at home (Northern Ireland) but I've heard that you still have to do tests in Germany (after a year or something) in order to transfer the license. Also, in NI you get a restricted ® license for 9 months or so (at least they did 10 years ago). Could I drive with this in Germany or get an international license with this R license? Thanks

Tara

As already stated a licence validly obtained in any EU country must be recognised here, and does not have to be converted. The important word is validly. If you're registered as a resident here, and pop over to your home country to do the licence, it is officially not valid as you are not a resident of your home country at the time of the test. I think you have to deregister for over 6 months to lose your resident status here. In practice no one will really know this if you're over 28, as you can say it's your second licence (in Ireland they have to be renewed every 10 years and I guess it's the same in most other countries).

 

What exactly is a "restricted" licence? Do you get it before or after you do the test. In the south you can get a "provisional licence" before you do the test. This is not valid outside the jurisdiction. If a restricted licence in the north is the same, then it won't be recognised here either. If it is only a sort of probationary period after passing your test, then it should be recognised. They have a two year probationary period here as well.

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Here's a tip for study materials and those who are somewhat german-able:

 

BUY THE CD. This replaces buying paper test questions, and is, as far as I know, quite a bit cheaper, unless you can get them from a TTer.

 

You will be able to study W-A-Y faster on a computer, and you will be able to cover every possible question, many times. With paper, you'll probably just get tired. The programs track which questions you've answered, and where you have weak spots. They also scramble the positions of the answers, so you don't rehearse answers-by-position.

 

You can get a CD for about 15 EUR at Huegenduebel.

 

Drawback:

 

I've only found the CDs in german, but there *may* be english versions. While my german is OK, this is all in "govmint german", so you'll [have to] learn some nice phrases for your next trip to the KVR. However, questions rarely have more than three lines of text, and you'll avoid the "bad translation" factor on the test that some folks experience when taking it in english. In the end, you learn the right answers, almost rhytmically, so language drops out of the picture to some extent.

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Hi does anyon eknow if its possible for a non-driver to learn how to drive here/get his driving license in Munich and preferably through English??? Is it possible? Info? Suggestions appreciated, thank you very much

 

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I want to learn how to drive, any idea and suggestion on

 

where to get quiet an affordable price and any general tit bits and recommendations preferably everything in english.

 

thanks

 

miriam

 

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Anybody know of a reputable Fahrschule that instructs in Portuguese (ie: Brasilian)? We've got a friend who would rather do the driving practice in her native language. Written test etc. is no problem in german though.

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Could anyone kindly tell me Fahrschule that can give instruction in English in Munich (preferably in the north part)?

 

thanks!

 

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Check the first page of this thread. Many of us did at Christinne timmer. Try to get the driving practicals with the new guy there (forgot name), he is quite good.

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Anyone wants the book for the theory exam as well as the question & answer set in English? It's the latest edition "Auflage 5/2005 from Verlag Vogel Heinrich". I have just finished the exam and want to sell it at a cheap price. (Paid EUR110 for the whole set!) Just send me a message.

 

Carol

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