Brussels Terror Attacks: Islamist Jihadist Terrorists Strike Again

502 posts in this topic

9 minutes ago, yourkeau said:

But no social media, no internet, no forums to discuss, only pubs. 

Yep, my point exactly. Nowadays it's very easy to exchange opinions across the globe, back then one was limited at the immediate friends/neighbours/same pub goers.

 

I spoke with a few (older) Germans about the RAF times. They were telling me it was not uncommon to be pulled over by police with guns drawn, being subjected to detailed searches and questioning etc. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yourkeau said:

A European perspective:

1919329_1150435111635540_156142070937592

 

The most dangerous years were 70-80s, but people were far less hysterical back then. This is one of the few cases when I regret that I live in this century.

 

That wave of terror ended with the collapse of the Soviet Union. When will the current wave of terror end? The answer is simple: after collapse of OPEC. This is expected to happen in circa 10 years.

Shows how times have changed.

Can guarantee if this was the 70s and 80s many people (especially Americans) would be posting on here about how the IRA are not terrorists but an oppressed people fighting for their freedom and being forced to adopt the methods they did.

One mans terrorist is another mans freedom fighter as the famous saying goes.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Concerning the comparisions being made here between the despicable attacks commited by the RAF then and ISIS now, there is an important difference. I'm an older person, who lived in Germany during the RAF times and as far as I can recollect the RAF didn't target crowds of random people like what ISIS supporters in Europe are currently doing.  Also the RAF attacks were restricted to Germany alone (except the seige of the West German Embassy in Stockholm) and there were no open borders during those times either. 

 

Here's a list of the RAF victims who were killed: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Todesopfer_der_Rote_Armee_Fraktion

 

Quote

In den Jahren 1971 bis 1993 wurden durch die linksextremistische Terrororganisation Rote Armee Fraktion 34 Personen ermordet oder getötet. Ziel der Terroranschläge waren Führungskräfte in Politik, Wirtschaft und Verwaltung sowie amerikanische Soldaten. Bei Banküberfällen, Kontrollen, Verhaftungsversuchen und Entführungen wurden auch Polizisten, Zollbeamte und Fahrer ermordet.[1] Gezählt werden hier Todesopfer, schwer oder lebensgefährlich verletzte Personen sind nicht erfasst.

 

In the years 1971 to 1993 34 people were murdered or killed by the extreme left-wing terrorist organisation RAF. The targets of the terrorist attacks were leaders in politics, business and administration , as well as American soldiers. During bank robberies, checks, attempted arrests and kidnappings policemen, customs officers and drivers were murdered. The list doesn't include persons who were severely injured or who were inflicted with life-endangering injuries. 

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This article gives several reasons on why terrorists are drawn to Belgium.

Quote

 

The reasons why Belgium is attractive to terrorists are diverse. First there is its strategic location between France, Germany and the UK. In two hours one can cross Belgium by car, and because Belgium is part of the Schengen area its outside borders are open, making it extremely easy for terrorists to enter and leave the country quickly.

 

Second, the anonymity of Belgium’s capital appears to offer an ideal hiding place, with some sympathisers for the terrorist struggle – individuals, not communities – willing to give a helping hand to plotters. The fact that the name of Molenbeek turns up so often is obviously worrying.

Molenbeek – one of Brussels’ 19 districts– has a population of about 100,000, with around 30% of foreign nationality and more than 40% with foreign roots. Unemployment is higher than 25%, with youth unemployment even higher. Young inhabitants, often with Muslim backgrounds, do not get the same chances in the labour or housing market, and testify how in their everyday lives they are confronted with racism. They have the perfect profile to be prone to radicalisation. If the Belgian state had put more effort into integrating migrant communities, the potential for radicalisation would be significantly smaller today.

 

Third, the Islamic experience in Belgium has characteristics that differ from other European countries. There is a lack of local imams; most of the imams have been imported from abroad or educated there. Belgian security services point to an important religious influence from Wahhabi Islam, “sponsored” by Saudi Arabia through the Grand Mosque in Brussels.

 

Fourth, Brussels has the reputation for being a place where you can easily buy illegal firearms. The fact that the city has no fewer than six different police zones makes the fight against illegal arms trafficking and other forms of organised crime cumbersome and inefficient.

 

Last, Belgium has a relatively small security apparatus. Although Brussels is the diplomatic capital of the world, Belgian state security only has some 600 employees (the exact figure is classified information). Its military counterpart, Adiv, has a similar number. That makes just over a thousand intelligence officers to secure a country that hosts not only Nato and the EU institutions but also the World Customs Organisation, the European Economic Area, the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (Swift), the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol), another 2,500 international agencies, 2,000 international companies and 150 international law firms.

One does not need to be 007 to understand that the security challenge is huge – not only taking into account terrorism but also espionage and cybercrime. The disregard of the Belgian political world for intelligence and the lack of an intelligence culture have allowed terrorist groups to proliferate.

 

 

If ISIS is aiming at destroying Western civilisation then I can't understand the logic in targeting crowds of innocent people on their way to work. Despite the fact that terrorism won't achieve anything at all, wouldn't there be a bigger political impact if they targeted (or tried to) any one of those institutions and organisations named in the latter part of the quote above (such as what happened with the attack on the World Trade Centre), even if they are better guarded than other buildings (with reference to the last paragraph in the quote above, which refers to security and the inefficiency of it (which I have bolded)?

 

It seems to me that these Islamist psycopaths are simply aiming at mass murdering and maiming as many innocent civilians as they can, while they are on their way to work, visiting rock concerts, eating out in a restaurant, visiting football matches etc. Lives don't matter, we are all infidels anyway. 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, bramble said:

Last, Belgium has a relatively small security apparatus. Although Brussels is the diplomatic capital of the world, Belgian state security only has some 600 employees (the exact figure is classified information). Its military counterpart, Adiv, has a similar number. That makes just over a thousand intelligence officers to secure a country that hosts not only Nato and the EU institutions but also the World Customs Organisation, the European Economic Area, the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (Swift), the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol), another 2,500 international agencies, 2,000 international companies and 150 international law firms.

 

What was the old comment about the perfect European state:  The police would be British, the cooks would be French, the train drivers Swiss, and so on.  Brussels should be a Euro City State with a significant Police and Security Apparatus provided by all members of the EU.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Porky Pine said:

My personal message to all these fu******g Islam/Muslim terrorists who in reality are just sex-starved thugs hoping to reap the rewards of 99 virgins in some Muslin form of heaven and who believe that blowing up innocent people is righteous:

Fact.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bramble said:

Belgian security services point to an important religious influence from Wahhabi Islam, “sponsored” by Saudi Arabia through the Grand Mosque in Brussels.

 

And there we have it again. The country that for some reason is regarded as one of our strong allies, seems to be at the root of many islamic fundamentalist problems. From the discrimination of women to barbaric medieval practices. This country has a lot to answer to.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On March 22, 2016 at 10:30:38 AM, Chocky said:

 

What impact have events like this had on your life?
Apart from not being allowed to carry liquids with you on airplanes, I can't think of another example where my quality of life has been affected by these idiots.

The psychological impact is huge.   You may not notice it much but events like the one in Brussels do have a psychological impact on the general population.

 

I come from a country that suffered from terrorism because of Pablo Escobar in the 80's and it left the Colombians who lived through that traumatized.  It is only now, 30 years later that people are opening up and talking about it and healing!

 

Back in the 80's we didn't have sophisticated computer systems so likely as an individual nothing much would happen to you, but in 2016 we do have the technology to be intrusive in people's private lives... so expect a lot of your freedoms to go away in the name of safety!

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allies does not mean friends...

 

It takes years, common interest and shared values to bring countries close.

Even then, they will still follow their own agendas.

 

 

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Andrea-87 said:

The psychological impact is huge.  

 

I actually reflected on that comment a bit later and realised it was insensitive. Of course these events affect people who weren't directly caught up in an attack, I think I was just putting on a show of bravado, I didn't mean to offend anyone with it.

Of course, the more frequent these attacks become in Europe, the more it will begin to affect the people of Europe at large, but we need to be strong, and do our best to not let the savages prevent us from living our lives as normal.

 

I hope you have a pleasant day, or as pleasant as is possible in the circumstances.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Chocky said:

 

Saudi Arabia is a terrorist state. Its citizens are the most prolific private funders of Daesh, supposedly to ameliorate some of the guilt they feel for living 'decadent' western lifestyles, and the UK is one of the biggest suppliers of military hardware to them. They are currently committing atrocities against civilians in Yemen, and in the mean time, this bunch of savages is exporting their death cult doctrine across the western world, where more people are being murdered in the name of Allah.

And the reason the west tolerates these barbarians? One single thing, the black stuff that comes out of the ground.

Piss on these fascists.

 

Oil...the root of much of the world problems, on many fronts

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Alcala said:

and Germanys answer #aufdieLiebe

 

Yes, because that loveydovey bs is going to help defeat religious fundamentalists hell bent on causing death and chaos whereever they go.

6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The dopey Germans need to get with the program, it's time for them and their Dear Leader to accept the fact that Europe, and European culture is under threat.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality.” -Ayn Rand.

 

German males more concerned about what scarf to wear today and if the beard is neatly trimmed...

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a letter recently from my daughter's elementary school. We're apparently going to get some migrant students in ordinary classes in or around May because there won't be any transitional courses for them, although the school has requested funding and specialized teachers, and, furthermore, they have a right to the courses. Instead, the migrant students will get volunteers teaching them German once a week.

 

Underinvestment in education, infrastructure, and security (perhaps also in other areas) seems to be a common theme as far as the German government is concerned. We can only hope that our run of relative good luck here in Germany continues and we don't experience what has occurred in Paris and Brussels, No doubt Angie and her staff have maximum security, so, yeah, "wir schaffen das".

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now