Six month "Looking for Work" visa.

13 posts in this topic

 

 

On 2016-03-08, 8:01:44, tor said:

I am wondering if it would work for an artist doing an audition tour.

 

Es kommt darauf an. ;)

 

Does the artist have a degree? Does the artist only want to audition in the Schengen Area? Does the artist have sufficient funds?

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I assume the artist would be able to fulfill the requirements listed on the page.

 

What I am wondering is if auditioning for agents, opera companies, orchestras, etc., counts as 'looking for work" in the eyes of the German visa system.

 

 

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On 2016-03-10, 10:45:38, tor said:

I assume the artist would be able to fulfill the requirements listed on the page.

 

The requirements are not very well written on the website.

 

On 2016-03-10, 10:45:38, tor said:

What I am wondering is if auditioning for agents, opera companies, orchestras, etc., counts as 'looking for work" in the eyes of the German visa system.

 

I can't see that it would be a problem as long as it is clear that the applicant would not be receiving any compensation for auditioning. Keep in mind that it is only possible to spend a maximum of 90 days within a six month period in other Schengen countries.

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You might want to consider the "self-employment" visa. It's designed fro free-lancing artists and usually takes about a week to process. They would need this information:

  • A completed application form
  • Two passport photos
  • Bank statements — like the other visas, they want to know you have money just in case you don’t find work. As before, the more money, the better.
  • A copy of your résumé.
  • Proof of residency — You’ll either need to be on a rental contract or be on someone’s rental agreement. You need to bring an official copy of the rental agreement to the immigration office. Adam of Travels of Adam, says, “All I’ve ever had are short sublets. You still have to register at a local city office, but all I’ve done is show up with a printed-out lease from the Internet and submitted that. Once you do that, you get the official form from the local office and that’s all the visa people want to see.”
  • Health insurance — you need to have German insurance that’s valid for at least one year. It’s easy to get once you’re in Germany, and you don’t need to be a German citizen to get it.
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1 hour ago, PhDMo said:
  • Health insurance — you need to have German insurance that’s valid for at least one year. It’s easy to get once you’re in Germany, and you don’t need to be a German citizen to get it.

One advantage of the six month job search permit under 18c is that only travel insurance is required,  whereas a freelance permit under 21 Abs 5 requires real health insurance. 

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On 6/21/2016, 12:54:39, engelchen said:

One advantage of the six month job search permit under 18c is that only travel insurance is required,  whereas a freelance permit under 21 Abs 5 requires real health insurance. 

 

@engelchen, do you know of a webpage, from the German Government or otherwise, which specifies the insurance requirements for a job seeker visa?

 

I have searched Toytown and Google for specifics over the past few days but have only found hints and comments that the insurance requirements are less for the job-seeker visa. I expect the requirements would be less since it's shorter than the others, and with said visa, uncertain if one will stay longer than 3-6 months (in my case, I am applying for an extension to my Schengen visa as a US Citizen).

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In case someone comes across this thread in the future and this proves to be helpful, below is what I did in my case. I am a US Citizen already in Germany, nearing the end of my 90-day Schengen Tourist Visa.

 

According to one of the independent insurance brokers recommended on TT and employees at TK and Mawista: I must use a "temporary" private health insurance from a firm that specializes in such situations such as ExpactCare from Mawista (60 EUR/mo, "excluding USA/Canada" and it is all that is available to me to apply for while I only have a tourist visa). Such an insurance will suffice for the app for a Job-Seeker Visa (extension in my case since I am already here; aka Visum fuer Arbeitsplatsuche). From what I read and would expect, it doesn't serve very well as health insurance should I need/want to go to the doctor. The insurance doesn't suffice for residents - it seems to be specially tailored for this situation, similar to the situation a student would be in.

 

From what I understand, with a Job-Seeker Visa I can apply for a valid insurance in Germany or stay with Mawista until I find a job. Once I start a job, I will have to go with a valid insurance and can cancel my Mawista coverage through email.

 

If any of this proves to be incorrect in the long run, I will post an update; if all goes as expected, no update. I'm happy to answer questions if you, the reader, is in a similar situation.

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I realize this is an old thread, but will soon be pursuing this job seeking visa myself and had a couple questions in case anyone could help - thanks in advanced! If you could answer either of these that'd be super helpful thanks!

 

QUESTION 1:

 

I need to make an appointment to get it, and though my USA tourist visa expires in

February, there were not any appointment slots open until March 2019, BUT as long as I attend my appointment, and do not leave Germany after it expires in February, I will be OK.
 
Still, I am a little nervous since it still means my US tourist visa will be expired for roughly 1 month before my appointment! I'm understanding this correctly, right?
 
 
* If, when booking your appointment, your residence permit or national visa (type of visa: D) has not yet expired, the residence permit or national visa will be considered as continuing in Germany at least until the appointment scheduled today. This also applies to all conditions stipulated on your residence permit or national visa, including the regulations pertaining to gainful employment. Please be aware that this will only apply, if you attend the booked appointment!
Travelling abroad is only possible within the validity of your last residence permit.
 
QUESTION 2:
 
I checked this page https://service.berlin.de/dienstleistung/324661/en/ but I am confused regarding this section:
 
"Possession of a residence permit that allows pursuit of an economic activity (only in the case of previous residency) 
In the case of foreigners already resident in the Federal territory with another residence permit, this permit must have been issued for an occupation or self-employed activity (sections 18 - 21 of Residence Act).
Generally a residence permit for another purpose of residence cannot be issued during a stay for study purposes or family reasons, for example."
 
Here is my question: since I had a Freelance English Teaching permit in Hamburg (expired several years ago), does this mean I am now not eligible to apply for the job seeking permit? I currently do not hold any other visa or permit except for the tourist visa (US citizen).
 
Thanks so much for any advice you can give!!
 
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I'm happy to help!

 

tldr:

(repeated at end)

If you haven't already, check all of the Berlin neighborhood immigration offices for open appointments - I believe they can serve you if your registered address is anywhere in Berlin. Otherwise, I recommend you email/call the Berlin immigration office, assuming your registered address is in Berlin, or will be by then, and focus on question 1. If you get a patient immigration officer, then bring up your long-expired working visa and detail your situation to check that you didn't overlook anything. From what I have heard and expect, Berlin officers are the most overworked and thus least patient. Also, here is a link to the relevant article from one of the most helpful sites I found, and which is especially relevant to you in Berlin: https://www.settle-in-berlin.com/germany-visa/germany-job-seeker-visa-requirements/

 

(To confirm, the ending of my previous post (pasted below) is correct - at least regarding being able to stay on Mawista until I started my job. I was also able to use proof of my Mawista coverage to apply for my work visa, but with the expectation that I would apply for valid insurance.

From what I understand, with a Job-Seeker Visa I can apply for a valid insurance in Germany or stay with Mawista until I find a job. Once I start a job, I will have to go with a valid insurance and can cancel my Mawista coverage through email.)

 

--

 

FYI

I will be going through the process for a Visa for searching for work (Visum für Arbeitsplatzsuche, VFA), after having worked from March to December, assuming I am eligible to apply for it again. I already wondered if there might be an inconvenient reason that I am no longer eligible for a VFA, whether having already had it, or because I have already worked, or ... If not, I will come back to update. If there is not an update from me regarding my situation, assume I was eligible and the process went similarly as before.

 

1. 

 

I don't know that you are okay to stay with an expired tourist visa. I would predict not. The "residence permit or national visa (...D)" in the exceprt you posted stands out to me. The tourist visa definitely isn't the former; I would bet it's not the latter, too. I did some quick searching for examples of type D visas:

 

"

Non-EU and non-EEA nationals that want to stay longer than three months in Germany for whatever reason: studying, research, family reunion, have to apply for a German National Visa, or else known as a D Visa, at the competent mission before arriving in the country, i.e. consulate or embassy at one’s country of residency.

Excluded from this category are the citizens of Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, the Republic of Korea and the United States of America who may obtain any residence permit that may be required after entering the Federal Republic of Germany.

"

https://visaguide.world/europe/germany-visa/long-stay/

 

I read the excerpt as USA citizens are exempt from having to apply for a D Visa before arriving in Germany, which citizens of many other countries have to apply for, and which allows one to stay longer than 3 months. Since the tourist visa does not allow for stays longer than 3 months, I would expect that it is not a type D visa.

 

 

2.

 

I think this is a non-issue in your current situation. You state that your self-employed visa is long expired, and you state that you are now on a tourist visa. Below is how I read the excerpt you included.

 

In the case of foreigners already (NOW) resident in the Federal territory with (OR ON) another (VALID) residence permit 

 

 

IN-SUM:

(repeat of tldr)

 

If you haven't already, check all of the Berlin neighborhood immigration offices for open appointments - I believe they can serve you if your registered address is anywhere in Berlin. Otherwise, I recommend you email/call the Berlin immigration office, assuming your registered address is in Berlin, or will be by then, and focus on question 1. If you get a patient immigration officer, then bring up your long-expired working visa and detail your situation to check that you didn't overlook anything. From what I have heard and expect, Berlin officers are the most overworked and thus least patient. Also, here is a link to the relevant article from one of the most helpful sites I found, and which is especially relevant to you in Berlin: https://www.settle-in-berlin.com/germany-visa/germany-job-seeker-visa-requirements/

 

 

Please let me know if you would like clarification on what I wrote or have further questions.

 

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On 21.12.2018, 10:35:11, lehrer41 said:

 

I need to make an appointment to get it, and though my USA tourist visa expires in

February, there were not any appointment slots open until March 2019

 

I second Himmelszelts advise to check for free slots every single day, because:

 

Quote

BUT as long as I attend my appointment, and do not leave Germany after it expires in February, I will be OK.

 

No, sorry – you will not be ok. Once your 90 days as a tourist are over you become an illegal alien. Your quote from the Berlin website refers to residence permits and/or D type visas. But you neither have a resident permit nor a D-type visa, you have a simple tourist visa valid for only 90 days. 

 

I don't want to frighten you and doesn't have to be that bad, but the illegal stay in Germany is a criminal offense and can be punished harshly. In addition, a temporary but multi-year EU-wide ban on entry and residence is usually imposed. 

 

So make every effort to get an appointment before your visa expires!

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Thanks so much for the advice everyone -the links were especially helpful too. Will keep you all updated how it goes! (Won't be for a few months though til I apply for it, probably late March)

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