Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

1,809 posts in this topic

On 24/05/2019, 16:57:55, Chris Marston said:

 

Below is an official statement that your Beamter should have known:

 

So, you are safe. I, on the other hand, am still waiting for my initial appointment.

 

ps. I like the term "disorderly Brexit". If there is one thing that "the Germans" dislike than it is disorderliness.

 

1 hour ago, Berlinexpatnine said:

I’m submitting my naturalization application in Berlin, and as a freelancer, they want a statement from my tax advisor showing my monthly net income after social insurance contributions and taxes are subtracted out.

Are there any other freelancers on this board who have also had their tax advisor submit this statement? Both my tax advisor and my immigration lawyer are confused about it. My lawyer has been researching it but still doesn’t have clear answers for me yet. Anyway:

1.      For social insurance, it seems logical that they would want the health insurance costs of my entire family taken into account (because the entire family is applying for citizenship at once), not just my personal health insurance costs, which happen to be private.

2.      I only have private pension insurance contributions, so I have subtracted them out as well, but it’s also not really clear whether they need to be included. Certainly that would be subtracted out if it was the Deutsche Rentenversicherung. I’m not sure if my wife’s numbers (as a housewife) for private pension insurance should be included at all.

3.      I would assume that since they want taxes taken into account, they also want me to subtract out my income tax, but that wasn’t clear either.

Has anyone gotten clear answers to these questions?

I’m self employed & needed the same from Steuerberater. I actually got given a form to pass on , for past years & 2019 predicted.  (copy below with header edited out)

it was a table broken down into:

gewinn:

yearly deductions health insurance:

yearly pension deductions:

tax:

netto:

signed & dated from Steuerberater.

also had to provide steuer Bescheinigung for last years, Health insurance documents, pension.

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Just got back from dropping off my documents for naturalization at Bezirksamt Pankow. They said that one two people were processing applications and they it would be 18 months before they would contact us again for our final appointment.

 

We are also cancelling our backup appointment time for dropping off documents on June 26th, so an appointment on that date should become available in a bit, if they re-release the appointments immediately.

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Actually, I looked and they didn't immediately release the appointment for June 26 that we cancelled. It looks like it will be released at the normally scheduled times on Monday and Wednesday morning (or perhaps Tuesday -- whatever schedule it follows).

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Can any self-employed people share what they needed to provide as proof of confirmation of Health Insurance

 

Quote

- Bestätigung der Krankenkasse über bestehende Kranken- und Pflegeversicherung

 

I have:

1.  Confirmation for Tax Returns letter from Feb 2019 (Bestätigung für Ihre Steuererklärung)

2.  Certificate of insurance at TK (Bescheinigung über die Versicherung bei der TK)

 

is it enough?

 

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Not sure what number 1 is referring to (an annual income tax assessment?), but you would want number 2 to certify when insurance began at TKK. If you had previous coverage in Germany, you would want to show proof of that as well.

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14 minutes ago, Dangeross said:

is it enough?

It was for me. That's exactly what I took to the first appointment at the Rathaus...and I got my German citizenship this morning. As it happens they didn't even  take a copy of my tax return, but I think taking as much supporting evidence as you can shows willing and can only help.

 

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Could we get a survey going of the amount of time it has taken to get dual citizenship processed? I would appreciate it if partipants could name the jurisdiction they applied in and the amount of time it took from complete submission of documents until acceptance. You can also state extenuating circumstances if the amount of time was particularly short or particularly long.

 

My lawyer was surprised at the estimates that have been given to me by the people doing the processing work (2 years as stated by one agent, 18 months stated by another -- both in Berlin Pankow). He wants to check in with them three months after initial submission of documents.

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OK, this was ages ago, I had to look in my files. I submitted all the documents and my application 

on the 14th of March 2005 and my dual citizenship was granted on the 8th of April 2005, so it took

just over three weeks. Back then there was no citizenship test, but everything else was much the 

same as today. That was in Tübingen (Baden-Württemberg), where I lived at the time. 

By the way: I have been self-employed since the early 90s. They accepted a letter of 

confirmation for my private health insurance, no further questions asked. 

 

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I had my appointment at Bad Muenstereifel Rathaus on 22 March 2019 at which I handed over all of my documents. I received my letter telling me that my application was accepted last Friday, and called for an appointment yesterday. This morning I received citizenship. So, all in all I think that makes 11 weeks start to finish. I doubt anyone will beat that. I love the Eifel.

 

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On 4/13/2019, 12:48:19, dj_jay_smith said:

Some have posted on this thread that they have been successful in applying early, the beamter just puts the details on file and then submits them when the time comes, while others have said that they have been rejected.  So there is no simple answer to that and you might have to just try.  It might also depend on how early you are.

 

Of course you need to have also been in Germany for 3 years as well as married to a German for 2, and meet all the other conditions as well (B1 German, passed citizenship exam etc. etc.)

Unfortunately, I have been advised not to apply if I do not want to give up my British citizenship. The case worker told me that the material conditions are not yet given because the two years of marriage are only going to be "completed" in November. So, I will have to wait and hope for another extension of article 50.

 

@dstanners Congrats!

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1 minute ago, Chris Marston said:

So, I will have to wait and hope for another extension of article 50.

 

Unfortunately with BoJo as PM the chances of that are going to be rather slim.

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4 minutes ago, HEM said:

 

Unfortunately with BoJo as PM the chances of that are going to be rather slim.

I know. But then, who knows?

 

I am fairly relaxed because I also have an Irish citizenship application on the go. Better safe than sorry. I just wish all this bureaucratic paperwork would not take up so much time.

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I started the process in Berlin Schöneberg in February this year.  I handed in everything at that point except for the Einbürgerungstest, which was scheduled at the end of April.  I got the results of that in the middle of May and handed the certificate in straight away.  I was only technically eligible for German citizenship at the end of May after 2 years of marriage anyway.  Last week I got a letter telling me I can go in to pick up my Einbügerungsurkunde.  So total time was ~15 weeks, but I suspect it would've been quicker if I'd done my Einbürgerungstest earlier, however I couldn't get an earlier appointment.  So now BoJo can do what he wants, I don't care!  Good luck to the rest of you!

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12 hours ago, mystrg said:

I started the process in Berlin Schöneberg in February this year.  I handed in everything at that point except for the Einbürgerungstest, which was scheduled at the end of April.  I got the results of that in the middle of May and handed the certificate in straight away.  I was only technically eligible for German citizenship at the end of May after 2 years of marriage anyway.  Last week I got a letter telling me I can go in to pick up my Einbügerungsurkunde.  So total time was ~15 weeks, but I suspect it would've been quicker if I'd done my Einbürgerungstest earlier, however I couldn't get an earlier appointment.  So now BoJo can do what he wants, I don't care!  Good luck to the rest of you!

 

Congrats fellow Berliner. I am also glad I don't have to care about what Baby blimp's long lost younger brother wants. Good luck to everyone too. 

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Was anyone here successful with less than 8 years residency in Germany? According to this website, even 6 years could be sufficient if, for example, one's German language skills are good enough. I don't know why my case worker was so adamant that I do not qualify despite C2 and intermittent residence of more than 7 years?

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59 minutes ago, Chris Marston said:

Was anyone here successful with less than 8 years residency in Germany? According to this website, even 6 years could be sufficient if, for example, one's German language skills are good enough. I don't know why my case worker was so adamant that I do not qualify despite C2 and intermittent residence of more than 7 years?

 

 

Intermittent residency is not enough.  You must have 6-8 years of continuous residency (3 years residency if married to a German for min 2 years).   Nothing else will be accepted, ever!  And you must be able to prove this, a simple anmeldung is not enough proof.

 

C2 language skills are also not enough by themselves for 6 years.  You must also show that you are well integrated into society.  Exactly how is open to discussion, but normally means some kind of club membership, voluntary work etc.

 

Even then you still of course have to meet the other requirements regarding citizenship test, financially able to support yourself & your dependents now and in retirement etc.

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1 hour ago, Chris Marston said:

Was anyone here successful with less than 8 years residency in Germany? According to this website, even 6 years could be sufficient if, for example, one's German language skills are good enough. I don't know why my case worker was so adamant that I do not qualify despite C2 and intermittent residence of more than 7 years?

 

As well as a min of B2 a lot of times you will also have to show additional integration into the community i.e. volunteering, etc. in order to be able to apply for residency after  years, which will be what the following paragraph on the website you have linked to is talking about:

 

" Zusätzlich zu den nachgewiesenen besonderen Integrationsleistungen sind Nachweise dafür erforderlich, dass die Eingliederung in die deutschen Lebensverhältnisse weit fortgeschritten ist (z.B. im Betriebsrat, in der Jugendarbeit, der Schülervertretung usw.). "

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