Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

1,869 posts in this topic

Here the pen was a really big deal. She emphasised fountain pen, even.

 

Luckily ink erasers have come on a lot since my last efforts with a fountain pen ;)

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would never have gotten in, over the border in Hannover then.

There is no way they would have read my handwriting, and almost everything that wasn't just a cross in a box was on those separate typed sheets that I handed in. 

I've said it before, but my-goodness I was lucky with my Beamter.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This handwritten CV is the only sticking point for me. Not sure exactly what details they want.

 

However on my checklist there is no mention of a specific pen to use, nor if said CV should be legible

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, RomfordReject said:

This handwritten CV is the only sticking point for me. Not sure exactly what details they want.

 

However on my checklist there is no mention of a specific pen to use, nor if said CV should be legible

 

I hadn't really thought too much about what I'd put on the CV yet (I won't need it for 3 months probably). Has anyone been given any guidance from a beamter on what should/shouldn't be on it and if it's best as a one-page thing? It would be a disaster to get your Termin at the burgeramt, have all your documents and get rejected because the CV isn't the way they wanted it. I'd quite like to just write what's on my LinkedIn profile but that might be way off.

 

I think I'll go for a black Stabilo point 88 fine 0.4.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been gleaning information from Google but as always in these situations there are several versions. It has to be in the format “My name is...and I was born on...in .... “.

 

i am just going to copy relevant information from my typed CV

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just told that it had to be about 1 side of A4, hand-written. I mean I could have gotten somebody else to write it for me (wife), but then it would have looked odd if the handwriting was completely different to that on the forms I was filling in!

 

Still it was acceptable what I did so all good

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I'll go for a hand-written version of this. It's weird, I haven't had a CV since about 1992.

 

b4949dad99524d43c808cf30084fd305.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Derek said:

I think I'll go for a hand-written version of this. It's weird, I haven't had a CV since about 1992.

 

Funny, my Beamter did not ask for a Lebenslauf and it's not in my list of documents. Maybe I'll do one anyway incase they change their minds :huh:

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Dangeross said:

 

Funny, my Beamter did not ask for a Lebenslauf and it's not in my list of documents. Maybe I'll do one anyway incase they change their minds :huh:

 

Strange. It's actually printed on the list of documents from my Burgeramt. I just noticed though that it doesn't say hand written. I must have only heard about that on this forum and not seen it anywhere else. That's a relief, it would never have looked good. I'm doing a printed out one.

 

 

2019-03-08 20.19.01.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- I think you will find that the list of requirements varies somewhat between the Bundesrepubliks.

My list of requirements certainly wanted to see how bad my writing was!!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, RomfordReject said:

Here in Niedersachsen you only need to provide proof of actually sitting the exam

Not everywhere, some places insist on seeing the certificate, my person would not even look at the antrag without seeing it.. 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Concerning the handwritten CV, here's information (Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator)

https://www.bewerbungsanschreiben.info/stichwort-lebenslauf-fuer-einbuergerung/

 

Quote

 

The handwritten curriculum vitae for naturalisation
The fact that the handwritten curriculum vitae for naturalisation is not created with the computer is not a concession, because it is assumed that people without German citizenship do not have a computer, but rather that it is a form of test. The test checks whether you can write well and legibly in a foreign language (and therefore often also in a foreign font). Experts recommend to use a white paper without lines and to write with a fountain pen, because this embellishes the typeface. Tip: Place a lined or squared sheet underneath in order to write cleanly, legibly and in a neat typeface even on the unstructured sheet.

In terms of content, you need to answer these questions:


In the naturalisation test, not only language skills are decisive.

What is your name?

Where do you live?
How can you be reached (telephone, mobile phone, e-mail)?
What is your marital status?
Which religious community do you belong to?
When and where were you born?
Where do your parents live?
Where did you go to school and what qualifications did you obtain?
What education did you complete?
Which degree did you complete?
What language skills do you have?
How mature are your PC skills?
What other knowledge and qualifications do you have?
Which leisure activities do you pursue regularly?
What do you like in Germany and why do you strive for naturalization?


If you would like to answer all these questions, then you will always have enough material to fill out an extensive curriculum vitae. Experts recommend that you always write your CV for naturalisation in a continuous text (similar to a detailed CV). Tell a story without taking extreme positions. It is best to write down the answers to these questions once (by hand or computer) and have them proofread. This will ensure that you have written in correct German. Then copy the corrected version by hand and use the white, unruled paper. Write slowly and make every effort to ensure that your writing is properly regarded, as this shows your sincere interest and commitment.

 

 

I wrote mine on the computer first and copied it onto white unlined paper in handwriting. I used a ballpoint pen. I handed in the handwritten version as well as the computer print out for easier reading.

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, bramble said:

Concerning the handwritten CV, here's information

 

Thanks for that :D

 

I find it strange though that they want to still test you further than they already have courtesy of the B1 test which involved written parts, plus they can see all the handwriting they want on the forms that were filled in. Maybe the reason some of the Burgeramts don't ask for this is that they realise the redundancy involved. I'm gonna write one anyway (different to the printed Lebenslauf) using that info you posted because the risk of not having it and the delay it would result in is too great.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Derek said:

 

Thanks for that :D

 

I find it strange though that they want to still test you further than they already have courtesy of the B1 test which involved written parts, plus they can see all the handwriting they want on the forms that were filled in. Maybe the reason some of the Burgeramts don't ask for this is that they realise the redundancy involved. I'm gonna write one anyway (different to the printed Lebenslauf) using that info you posted because the risk of not having it and the delay it would result in is too great.

 

It's a pain in the neck and I was cursing while I was handwriting mine. Took me ages. I'm not used to handwriting anything anymore, except maybe my shopping list, which is a scribble normally. But the Beamtes are only following rules no matter how much they might think how stupid it is. Best to be accommodating with bureaucrats, they have the upper hand after all. 

 

Edit: My Philippine daughter-in-law will be applying this year and I've typed out a Lebenslauf for her using short simple sentences in correct German, which she will copy in handwriting on white unlined paper. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I haven't considered is my driver's license. How do I go about getting that converted to a German one and how long does it take?

Cheers

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, johnieutah said:

One thing I haven't considered is my driver's license. How do I go about getting that converted to a German one and how long does it take?

Cheers

 

There are multiple threads on that already. Just type U.K. driver's license in the search box.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading the posts submitted over the last couple of days, I decided
to post my thoughts, although I've already mentioned most of it previously,
so here goes - at the risk of repeating some things.

 

My application for dual citizenship was not Brexit driven.

 

My decision to apply for German citizenship precedes the entire Brexit debate
by about ten years. For me it was more an emotional and personal thing than
practically motivated, I felt a desire to belong to and actively participate
(politically) in the country in which I had been living for over 20 years.
Back in 2005 there was no need for me to apply for dual citizenship, but I
had been thinking about it for a couple of years. I only acted on it when
dual citizenship became available. There is no rational reason for keeping
my British citizenship, but I did not want to give it up. I cannot imagine
returning to the UK, my friends are here, and of course my wife. We own
our house and I have no relatives left in the UK. I would probably have
difficulties re-adjusting to a life in the UK after all these years.


In retrospect, having both passports has given me a tremendous sense of
security and peace of mind.

 

A quick timeline:
1983 - Arrival in Germany, 23 years old, university student
1988 - Finished degree, full-time employment in Germany
1995 - Goethe certificate C2 "Großes Deutsches Sprachdiplom"
2005 - End of March: Application for citizenship
2005 - April: Citizenship granted
2007 - Renewed my UK passport during a visit in the UK
2015 - Renewed my German passport / Ausweis
2018 - Renewed my UK passport again, but from Germany
2019 - Still here after 36 years, that wasn't in the Master Plan

 

I was asked to hand-write a CV at the time of my application. I was
prepared and already knew what I needed to write - one hand-written
page.  My case worker hardly glanced at it and certainly did not read
it, I could have written anything, he didn't care. He simply put it
into my file and ticked off the item on his list.

 

My German is fluent - but not perfect, never will be - but some German
friends say they can hardly hear an accent. I spoke German with my case
worker. He asked me for some kind of proof of my German, "it would be
grand indeed if you have something on paper" and no, a degree from
university does not count. I gave him a copy of the C2 Goethe certificate
"oh yeah, that will be fine" and he put it into the file.


My impression: within bounds they can make discretionary decisions.

I was not required to provide any translations (i.e. birth certificate,
etc.). My case worker said "no, that's OK, I can read English".  Any
non-English would have had to provide official translations. My luck,
my Beamter understands English. How about Türkish or Chinese?

 

There was no citizenship test back in 2005. I have tried one found
on the internet recently and would have passed it with little
preparation.

 

My driver's license was converted back in the 80's, haven't given
it a thouhgt since then.

 

The entire process took only four weeks back in 2005 and was much
less hassle than I had imagined it to be.  My case worker
even mentioned that it was quite unusual for someone from the UK to
apply for citizenship, but he also said that the number of applications
for citizenship from other EU countries had risen since Germany
had accepted dual citizenship. Anyway, I am glad it's over and
done with. I think the recent developments in the UK are regrettable,
but I don't have to worry about any personal consequences.  

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bramble's list of what to put on your hand written CV includes more stuff than I thought to put on my own but I think you can leave some bits out if you want. The CV was a few pages long because of all the moves and schools attended. I left out hobbies and never mentioned how I feel about Germany or living here at all. I had about two pages in the end and thought, don't add too much more or it will put them to sleep! 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/01/2019, 14:45:14, anne k said:

Mr Reif said he'd get it through quickly his end but couldn't promise it would be that fast.

Mr Reif invited me along next week to become German :) Only handed in the documents on 17 January!

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/8/2019, 2:50:37, RomfordReject said:

Here in Niedersachsen you only need to provide proof of actually sitting the exam

Guess that is only for Brits. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now