Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

1,803 posts in this topic

10 minutes ago, Derek said:

would ze Germans question the motivation to renew the ausweis and maybe reject it and question why they're wanting to keep dual citizenship even.

Erm, no. Does that happen to you when you renew your Bwitish pathport from here?

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10 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

So this draft law that was passed giving Brits 3 months to register, the German Government did not have to do?

 

I'm guessing they didn't. I assume they could kick you out on the 30th March if they wish. But I dunno, I'm not a lawyer.

 

10 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

I was supposed to pass this law?

 

Obviously not. So what's the problem. Are you pissed off that they did pass the law or that they haven't. I'm lost now, so I'll say it in caps. WHAT DO YOU WANT?

 

10 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

Why are you playing the TT clown?

 

Haha really. Is that the best you've got?

 

5 minutes ago, Derek said:

 

A thought just popped into my head ... I wonder what'll happen if a Brit who has dual citizenship moves back to the UK and then some years later wants to extend their ausweis (they need refreshing every 10 years I think). As that Brit in that scenario is no longer living in Germany would ze Germans question the motivation to renew the ausweis and maybe reject it and question why they're wanting to keep dual citizenship even.

 

Same as us Brits here in Germany getting new passports. I had to send my passport to the consulate in Düsseldorf for renewal if I remember correctly.

 

It depends where you live but there is a process. Some info here.

 

29 minutes ago, Sir Percy B said:

I'd strongly advise you to give up while you're ahead.

 

You think I'm ahead? You think I might lose that lead? Meh, I'm finding it amusing so far at least.

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Just now, theGman said:

 

Obviously not. So what's the problem. Are you pissed off that they did pass the law or that they haven't. I'm lost now, so I'll say it in caps. WHAT DO YOU WANT?

 

 

STOP TROLLING THIS THREAD.

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11 minutes ago, Derek said:

As that Brit in that scenario is no longer living in Germany would ze Germans question the motivation to renew the ausweis and maybe reject it and question why they're wanting to keep dual citizenship even.

 

No, once you are German you are German, there are constitutional level laws about taking away your German nationality and living outside Germany isn't one of the valid reasons to strip your citizenship.

Under the current laws in both Germany and the UK you won't lose your dual nationality by living elsewhere.

The UK can't take your German citizenship and won't take your UK citizenship (Unless you join ISIS or similar). Germany can't take your UK citizenship and won't take your German citizenship except for similar reasons.

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55 minutes ago, kapil354 said:

Hey pappnase, 

 

Thanks for detailing out the application process. 

 

For the German B1 test - was wondering whether you need a certificate from Goethe or just appearing at the amt for a brief test works fine?

 

Appreciate your response! :)

 

4 minutes ago, pappnase said:

 

I didn't need to do a formal language test at all. I was very lucky, the admin at my interview decided my German was clearly good enough. They gave me a brief test in the office where I had to read a simple text out loud, then answer spoken questions about the text. Lastly he asked me to write a few paragraphs in the form a postcard from a trip away. Took about 10 minutes all in all.

However this is all at the discretion of the person processing your request. The law says that they MUST accept a B1 certificate, but they can accept less if they are satisfied, so if they ask for a certificate you need a certificate.

 

Yea, you can't know for sure I'm afraid. People on here have detailed both experiences. I personally needed the certificate here in Munich. The Beamte even somewhat apologised to me for it. But never hinted at any time that the certificate was anything other than mandatory.

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4 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

STOP TROLLING THIS THREAD.

 

Okey dokey.

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Yeah, my wife had a chat with the guy after my interview and apparently if his boss wasn't happy with the decisions he was making regarding language competence then he could get in trouble, so some members of the team just always ask for the certificate. I definitely got the feeling that he felt sorry for me and wanted to make it as easy as possible, but there is no possible way to know in advance what you will get and I'm sure it will to some extent depend on the attitudes in the office where you attend and the the individual who conducts your appointment.

Certainly I don't think for a minute you can place much value on my experience in Bremen if you are applying from Bonn.

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8 minutes ago, deadsoul said:

Erm, no. Does that happen to you when you renew your Bwitish pathport from here?

 

6 minutes ago, theGman said:

Same as us Brits here in Germany getting new passports. I had to send my passport to the consulate in Düsseldorf for renewal if I remember correctly.

It depends where you live but there is a process. Some info here.

 

3 minutes ago, pappnase said:

No, once you are German you are German, there are constitutional level laws about taking away your German nationality and living outside Germany isn't one of the valid reasons to strip your citizenship.

Under the current laws in both Germany and the UK you won't lose your dual nationality by living elsewhere.

The UK can't take your German citizenship and won't take your UK citizenship (Unless you join ISIS or similar). Germany can't take your UK citizenship and won't take your German citizenship except for similar reasons.

 

I was thinking about having attained German citizenship as it being a second-class citizenship, one that was applied for and achieved but not a natural right by birth. I suppose despite it being slightly below a by-birth citizenship but very nearly almost equal it's therefore not lost or taken away just because you're not here (unless you get yourself knocked up by a terrorist). So those who were planning to go back to the UK soon should still be motivated to get dual citizenship because you retain that individual EU membership status :-)

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It's not in any way a 'second class' citizenship under German law, only in the minds of some bigoted idiots does such a thing exist.

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14 minutes ago, Derek said:

I was thinking about having attained German citizenship as it being a second-class citizenship, one that was applied for and achieved but not a natural right by birth.

 

No, there is no such thing. Once your're in, you're in.

 

14 minutes ago, Derek said:

I suppose despite it being slightly below a by-birth citizenship but very nearly almost equal it's therefore not lost or taken away just because you're not here (unless you get yourself knocked up by a terrorist). So those who were planning to go back to the UK soon should still be motivated to get dual citizenship because you retain that individual EU membership status :-)

 

People have citizenship's of countries they have never visited. I would absolutely advise anyone to get the German citizenship as a second citizenship if they can, regardless of what the future holds for them.

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3 hours ago, longch said:

In my view, this is not logical.

 

That I do not understand. It is a document which is not harder to apply for than permanent residency, carries with it the continuing EU status that we have had for most/all of our lives, and is not especially expensive.

 

Entirely logical to want such a thing.

 

Having a 'personal affiliation' is not a logical thing at all, it is a feeling - neither right nor wrong, logical nor illogical. Most of us probably have such an affiliation to some extent but that is going to vary. I did it to remain an EU citizen, which is important to me. Being German rather than Dutch is basically irrelevant except I live in Germany and am likely to do so for the foreseeable future. It is pragmatism, and why not? Most of us didn't choose this particular outcome. Many of us have children who may end up living in either place, and we want to be free to move ourselves accordingly, and return if we so wish.

 

Only someone else who has had a citizenship stripped from them will have an idea of what it is like - except ours is more nebulous because being EU is not an actual citizenship. I am deeply pissed off that it has happened, and totally get why there are people who have not yet got their minds around the situation and done something sensible about it. I wish them all the best.

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1 minute ago, kiplette said:

except ours is more nebulous because being EU is not an actual citizenship

 

Nope it is very concrete and specific.

 

You are an EU citizen if you are a citizen of an EU state. They are listed here:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Member_state_of_the_European_Union

 

If your state leaves the EU you lose your EU citizenship. You keep your national citizenship, ceteris paribus.

 

100% clear.

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55 minutes ago, Derek said:

 

 

 

I was thinking about having attained German citizenship as it being a second-class citizenship, one that was applied for and achieved but not a natural right by birth. ..

 

 

I see it more as the other way round.  You made a conscious decision to become German.  Decided to jump through all the hoops, 715 levels of bureaucracy required, paid lots of different fees just in order to become a citizen of that country.

The other one was just obtained by being born there to the right parents.  It didn't cost you any money, time, or effort, you had no choice in the matter.  

 

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2 hours ago, Billybulldog said:

@kapil354,it depends where you are. In Hessen we had to provide the Certificate, but I think “up North” in Schleswig Holstein etc. they are a bit more relaxed. NRW is probably more like Hessen I think...

Here in Niedersachsen you only need to provide proof of actually sitting the exam

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I had my meeting at the Landratsamt last week and had to provide B1 certificate, Einburgerungstest Certificate, Payslips etc but also a hand written CV :-)

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19 minutes ago, Nerdbloke said:

I had my meeting at the Landratsamt last week and had to provide B1 certificate, Einburgerungstest Certificate, Payslips etc but also a hand written CV :-)

 

I find it incredibly weird that they want the CV to be hand-written. Handwriting ranges from very good to barely legible. It's like they're wanting to make life difficult for themselves. Or is a hand-written CV a standard German thing? Do people apply for jobs with a hand-written one? I've never applied for a job here so it's never come up.

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8 minutes ago, Derek said:

Do people apply for jobs with a hand-written one?

 

No. Never seen or even heard of it.

 

I guess its one of those weird german things about physical bits of paper with ink signatures etc.  Even things like electronic bank statements are quite new here and i know people who dont trust them.

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Again, with the CV it depends Here in NRW they accepted it typed - nobody would have been able to read it otherwise!

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I always (and truly) thought they wanted to check your penmanship via the CV (among other things). 

 

how funny/awful would it be to be rejected solely on the basis of one's poor handwriting?!

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Bremen didn't want a CV at all, there were questions on the application form that covered school, education and job history, so they had all the info, but they didn't especially want it hand-written. I typed out all the info on a separate sheet and just said 'see attached' in the relevant sections.

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