Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

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German citizenship was generally inherited only through the father for those born before 1975. Might be a loophole if your parents weren't married at the time, but I second Metall's Suggestion to consult an attorney if that were the case. If your parents were married, I don't see how you'd be eligible now based on descent, but naturalization is still an option.

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6 minutes ago, Conquistador said:

German citizenship was generally inherited only through the father for those born before 1975. Might be a loophole if your parents weren't married at the time, but I second Metall's Suggestion to consult an attorney if that were the case. If your parents were married, I don't see how you'd be eligible now based on descent, but naturalization is still an option.

 

Unfortunately, they were married at the time, I just didn't want to spend money on lawyer..I hope i can find some other solution, My Grandmother was Irish but i only have a wedding certificate...again unfortunately, my Dad was the only brother not born in Ireland...Thank you both for your reply
 

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On 5. Oktober 2016 10:02:07, europaeuropa said:

Apart from the language test cert, citizenship test cert, passport, photos, completed form, what other docs are needed? Do they need a birth cert or is that just useful to have with you in case they ask? Is it long or short version of birth cert? 

I went along last week after gathering all the docs they wanted. Need to copy most of them myself. Then the happy Beamter saw my originals as well as the copies and was satisfied to keep the copies.

 

They wanted my British passport, birth certificate, proof that I live here (Anmeldung), same for my German wife, same for all the kids. 

 

Then proof of income, proof from employer that I have a job ( not just the contract).

 

Tax return for the pair of us.

Marriage certificate. 

Proof of Kindergeld

 

Then alliegence declarations: Germany is good, I am not planning a disturbance etc

 

And lastly, sign away my data protection. They can check with a list of other offices if I appear to be telling the truth.

 

Still need B1 test and the Einbürger test even though I have been here 25 years.

 

Thanks to brexit I decided to go for dual citizenship.

 

Expected duration in Schleswig-Holstein is 3 months...

 

 

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In that case I'd advise you to naturalize as a German- you can, of course keep your UK citizenship since the UK has yet to leave the EU.

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38 minutes ago, Conquistador said:

German citizenship was generally inherited only through the father for those born before 1975. Might be a loophole if your parents weren't married at the time, but I second Metall's Suggestion to consult an attorney if that were the case. If your parents were married, I don't see how you'd be eligible now based on descent, but naturalization is still an option.

 
 

Unfortunately, they were married at the time, I just didn't want to spend money on lawyer..I hope i can find some other solution, My Grandmother was Irish but i only have a wedding certificate...again unfortunately, my Dad was the only brother not born in Ireland...Thank you both for your reply

 

28 minutes ago, HH_Sailor said:

I went along last week after gathering all the docs they wanted. Need to copy most of them myself. Then the happy Beamter saw my originals as well as the copies and was satisfied to keep the copies.

 

They wanted my British passport, birth certificate, proof that I live here (Anmeldung), same for my German wife, same for all the kids. 

 

Then proof of income, proof from employer that I have a job ( not just the contract).

 

Tax return for the pair of us.

Marriage certificate. 

Proof of Kindergeld

 

Then alliegence declarations: Germany is good, I am not planning a disturbance etc

 

And lastly, sign away my data protection. They can check with a list of other offices if I appear to be telling the truth.

 

Still need B1 test and the Einbürger test even though I have been here 25 years.

 

Thanks to brexit I decided to go for dual citizenship.

 

Expected duration in Schleswig-Holstein is 3 months...

 

 

 


I have both short and long Birth cert..anyway I will make some further enquiries at the rathaus, my speaking German is not bad I just never learnt to read or right and i am to lazy now at my age...lol
But I might have to get my backside into gear

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29 minutes ago, Conquistador said:

In that case I'd advise you to naturalize as a German- you can, of course keep your UK citizenship since the UK has yet to leave the EU.,

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Yes, I will look into this definitely..thank you one and all 

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1 hour ago, eileenro said:

Anyone know this Question
I was born here back in 1947 German mother British father, iI have a German birth cert, now that things have changed back in the 70ties could I use my German Birth Cert to get a German passport without having to take any tests? I;m living here now.
Thanks

 

 

We're the same age. Father British, mother German. I also have a German birth certificate. My parents married after I was born and my father, although bioiogical, had to adopt me so that I could get a British birth certificate (so I actually have two), after we had moved to Wales after he was demobbed from the army in 1948. After that I was all my life legally considered British. 

 

Are you British? If so, I would consider applying for German citizenship, with the option for dual British/German citizenship (like I did last year) while there is still time to do so. Due to my age I didn't have to do any language or naturalisation tests (which wouldn't have been a problem for me anyway).  So enquire at your local Einbürgerungsbüro if these tests are at all necessary for you due to your age. All I had to do was supply documentation of my birth, marriage, divorce, pensions with bank statements (as evidence that I'm able to support myself). All foreign language documents have to be translated into German by a certified translator. 

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21 hours ago, bramble said:

 

We're the same age. Father British, mother German. I also have a German birth certificate. My parents married after I was born and my father, although bioiogical, had to adopt me so that I could get a British birth certificate (so I actually have two), after we had moved to Wales after he was demobbed from the army in 1948. After that I was all my life legally considered British. 

 

Are you British? If so, I would consider applying for German citizenship, with the option for dual British/German citizenship (like I did last year) while there is still time to do so. Due to my age I didn't have to do any language or naturalisation tests (which wouldn't have been a problem for me anyway).  So enquire at your local Einbürgerungsbüro if these tests are at all necessary for you due to your age. All I had to do was supply documentation of my birth, marriage, divorce, pensions with bank statements (as evidence that I'm able to support myself). All foreign language documents have to be translated into German by a certified translator. 

 

Dear Bramble
thank you so much your post was really helpful and i will get onto it asap
Yes, I have a British pp &  pension..I also own my own apt here..Thanks again have a great weekend 

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Hello Bramble;

Can you possibly post a reference to the language age limit regulation? It might help my OH who's considering German dual nationality application; he is 67. (I've apllied for my Irish passport!) 

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@eileenro @Feierabend

 

The best thing is to go to your local Einbürgerungsbüro and talk to the Sachbearbeiter there. Mine was very friendly and supportive, though my advantage is that I actually speak German like a native (went to school here), so obviously she was impressed. But she did call a colleague in my presence to affirm that the language test wasn't necessary due to my age, as well as the Einbürgerungstest on the same grounds. There was no mention to the colleage that I was talking German fluently. There was no mention of a medical certificate either. 

 

When I handed in my application, I couldn't oblige with my German school reports (which would have additionally helped to prove my German language abilities) as they had over the years somehow gone missing, but to be on the safe side I included copies of my accumulated German job references over the years as a kind of substitute proof. This was purely my idea and wasn't a condition from their side and the case worker included them in the file anyway. It's a good idea to include anything which might be benificial for approval. The Sachbearbeiter at your local Einbürgerungsbüro, though, isn't the person who decides whether your application is approved or not. Your application is forwarded to the Kreisverwaltung, which might be in a different locality, for processing and approval/rejection. This takes a few months, in my case it was 7 months.

 

What you will also have to include though is a Lebenslauf in German (report, not tabular). In my locality it had to be handwritten. 

 

Don't worry about the Einbürgerungstest should that be demanded of you. It's so easy. You only need 17 right answers out of 33, which you can practice online as often as you need to. After a few tries you are bound to get at least the 17 you need, even if you're guessing some of them. 

 

Good luck!

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Thank you for your experience and advice. It's really for my OH who, while he gets by with basic vocab, practically has a physical aversion to grammar learning even at the fairly elementary level required for B1. It kind of enrages him!! He's extremely bright but not linguistically. He 'd have no problem with the cultural knowledge test.

We've been here a long time, own our house etc etc but there's no harm in trying to cover all bases ...

 

There's a similar thread on Deutsche in London and it's sad to hear the anxieties that German folks over there are going through. Worse than here, I think.

http://www.deutsche-in-london.net/forum/topic/68097-brexit-wie-geht´s-weiter/page-18#entry601596

 

 

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Has anybody applied for a German citizenship who changed their name by deed poll?

 

I stupidly did not order certified backcopies of the deed many moons ago, so all I have is my current and previous uk passport both in my changed name, and obviously a birth cert long version that doesnt match. I guess I could use a photocopy of the deed and hope they don't ask for a certified copy (which lets face it, is probably only going to get translated anyway)

 

Im afraid if I go through with german citizenship, they will force me to reactivate my old birth name just because its on my birth cert and/or maybe because in becoming naturalized, I will be subject to the german naming conventions, and can't ordinarily change birth name because "one feels like doing so". 

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(I would hope that a uk passport document in my changed name that should have immediate acceptance internationally, takes priority over a birth cert in my birth name that probably won't be accepted internationally anyway until translated. But you never know, they could be a stickler about it)

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In response to Eileen. If your grandmother was Irish, born in Ireland, then according to paragraph 1 of section on 'Born outside Ireland', on the link below, your father, even though not born in Ireland, would be considered an Irish citizen.

The first sentence in Paragraph 2 would indicate, that as your father is considered an Irish citizen, you too are entitled to become an Irish citizen.

Citizens Information Ireland - Citizenship

First you must register your birth (using a form available online) with Foreign Birth Register. Once you receive your certificate, you can then apply for a passport as normal.  The website provides details.

The more the merrier!

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Can be fun trying to get hold of grandparent's long form birth certificate though.  No trace of one for my grandfather.  He always said birth registration was destroyed in the 1922 Dublin Record Office fire.  So all I have is a British Passport he had, saying he was born there, and his marriage certficate in Dublin. but that does not help much.  

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On 5.11.2016, 17:39:49, europaeuropa said:

Has anybody applied for a German citizenship who changed their name by deed poll?

 

I stupidly did not order certified backcopies of the deed many moons ago, so all I have is my current and previous uk passport both in my changed name, and obviously a birth cert long version that doesnt match. I guess I could use a photocopy of the deed and hope they don't ask for a certified copy (which lets face it, is probably only going to get translated anyway)

 

Im afraid if I go through with german citizenship, they will force me to reactivate my old birth name just because its on my birth cert and/or maybe because in becoming naturalized, I will be subject to the german naming conventions, and can't ordinarily change birth name because "one feels like doing so". 

Yep, didn´t bat an eyelid. I had to provide my birth certificate + documentation regarding my name change. Thankfully Freiburg doesn´t require translations of british documents which saved me a whole heap of cash and hassle. Might be worth asking if this is the case in your locality.

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What are people's opinions about citizenship vs EC permanent residence? 

Post Brexit, I have been planning to apply for citizenship (I have all the tests and papers done and ready). I am doing it because I want to be able to stay here and move freely throughout Europe and live somewhere else in Europe if I choose. But I don't especially want to become a German citizen for any other reason. Now I see that I could also achieve my goals with EC permanent residence. Any thoughts on the relative pros and cons?

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I can't imagine whatever an "EC" permanent residence is, offers exactly the same benefits as citizenship of an EU member state. Or am I wrong?

 

Reside freely and WORK freely and access pension/healthcare freely aren't always mutually inclusive.

 

I think there is something like a non-EU citizen EU perma resident permit, which you would be allowed to apply for after 5 years from the moment the uk is no longer in the EU (lets assume 2024 would be when you could apply for that)

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