Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

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On 2/14/2017, 7:36:08, RenegadeFurther said:
1 hour ago, More tea, Vicar? said:

 

 

"Unfortunately", my second son was born three days before I got my response, so the "change in circumstances" since 2016 for me was, obviously, the new baby.  

Now I have to wait for our Elterngeldbescheid and send that over.  That will take some time.

 

The worst of it though:  I need to prove that I am no longer a Saffer, even though I was naturalised in London in 1991 as a Brit.   

 


 

I get it.

 

My German friend had to get proof of being German or whatever for his civil wedding to a non-German.

 

Turned out he was Czech all along.

 

Or something like this. I didn't follow the long story of paper-pushing.

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On 2/14/2017, 7:36:08, RenegadeFurther said:
1 hour ago, More tea, Vicar? said:
Just now, sos-the-rope said:

 

I get it.

 

My German friend had to get proof of being German or whatever for his civil wedding to a non-German.

 

Turned out he was Czech all along.

 

Or something like this. I didn't follow the long story of paper-pushing.

 

"Unfortunately", my second son was born three days before I got my response, so the "change in circumstances" since 2016 for me was, obviously, the new baby.  

Now I have to wait for our Elterngeldbescheid and send that over.  That will take some time.

 

The worst of it though:  I need to prove that I am no longer a Saffer, even though I was naturalised in London in 1991 as a Brit.   

 


 

Oh, but actually wanted to say CONGRATULATIONS @ More Tea, Vicar?

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55 minutes ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

I heard from a Brit who naturalized last summer that it took 3 months to process in Frankfurt (which is done in Darmstadt).

 

Mt,V?: I think it'll cost you a lot less for a translation from English.

 

I will get the document from SA in English and I will need to translate it into German.

 

Did you think I would get it in Afrikaans?

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1 hour ago, Erdmann said:

 

Not too bad, I'd say. :unsure:

 

test 123.jpg

 

I got 33 too, which can't be correct because I have never got full marks for anything in my life.

 

So I smell a rat.  I think they glaze over when you are looking like getting "most right" and just give you full marks in order to be able to go onto the next one.

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I got 33/33 as well.

 

It´s pretty hard NOT to get a perfect score. The questions and the answers are already provided to you beforehand.

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31 minutes ago, More tea, Vicar? said:

I got 33 too, which can't be correct because I have never got full marks for anything in my life

 

It just shows that the test is kinderleicht. They need to step up the challenge for one to earn the citizenship.

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5 hours ago, More tea, Vicar? said:

 

I will get the document from SA in English and I will need to translate it into German.

 

Did you think I would get it in Afrikaans?

 

Well, since you didn't understand what I wrote, maybe your stuff is in African: 'I think it'll cost you a lot less for a translation from English' ... to German, as you mentioned 100 euro for a translation.

 

 

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8 hours ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

 

Well, since you didn't understand what I wrote, maybe your stuff is in African: 'I think it'll cost you a lot less for a translation from English' ... to German, as you mentioned 100 euro for a translation.

 

 

 

No need to be brittle.  I appreciate that you were trying to be helpful.

 

This is the second time this week that I have noticed that written American can confuse an English-English native speaker because our eye looks for emphasis on a different word in the sentence to yours.

 

 

 

 

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Wow. Congrats. Its also surprising that the city went through it so quickly. For some reason I would have thought Cologne would have been not very efficient. Nice to be proved wrong on this one.

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17 hours ago, More tea, Vicar? said:

 

 

 

No need to be brittle.  I appreciate that you were trying to be helpful.

 

This is the second time this week that I have noticed that written American can confuse an English-English native speaker because our eye looks for emphasis on a different word in the sentence to yours.

 

 

 

 

 

I was trying to be funny and affable, actually :P

 

I'm not sure how what I wrote was particularly American, though.

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58 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

@More tea, Vicar?, have you applied for your child's British passport yet ?

 

Yes I have Pam.  The 3.5 year old has DEU and UK, and the brand new one will go the similar route, as soon as he gets his DEU.   I was on the UK.Gov website last week, and I had forgotten that you need "a" first passport (ie. DEU) to apply for the UK one.

 

I think your situation will be easier than mine because (I presume) you are British by birth.  I am British by naturalisation, so there was a bit of to-ing and fro-ing with Dusseldorf in 2014 trying to work out if Terrorist No. 1 is entitled.  Which he was, but he needs to live in the UK for two years later in life in order to be able to pass UK citizenship to his kids one day.

 

I think your kids will have it easier because of your citizenship by birth.

 

PS. I registered Terrorist No. 1's birth with the Embassy here in the hope back then that it would help him get the UK passport.  Total waste of money because the Cert. of Registration is an expensive piece of paper which does not entitle your child to citizenship.  Don't bother if you were entertaining the thought.  It isn't a British "Birth Certificate".  The only "Birth Certificate" is the one your child got in DEU.

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I would assume that UK consular registration is the same as US consular registration, no? My daughter has a consular report of birth abroad, which is also not a birth certificate, but is evidence of her US citizenship. Why would the UK allow her to register if she doesn't have the nationality? It makes no sense. Then again, UK laws are quite a mish-mash of heraldry and wizardry, as well as relics of their pirate past.

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36 minutes ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

I would assume that UK consular registration is the same as US consular registration, no? My daughter has a consular report of birth abroad, which is also not a birth certificate, but is evidence of her US citizenship. Why would the UK allow her to register if she doesn't have the nationality? It makes no sense. Then again, UK laws are quite a mish-mash of heraldry and wizardry, as well as relics of their pirate past.

 

No idea why they will register a child's birth, but this has nothing to do with its nationality.  I presume its for the (UK) parent's benefit, somehow.

 

From the UK Consular Birth Registration Form:

 

PLEASE NOTE: You are applying for a consular birth registration: this is not a UK birth certificate and should not be used as one. It does not replace the original birth certificate issued by the authorities in the country in which the birth took place.  It is not a certificate of identity.  A person does not acquire British nationality by virtue of having a consular birth registration. 

 

 

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Yeah it was pretty quick really, considering how busy they were.Getting an appointment could take a few months in Cologne, and I had to cancel my first in November due to hospital appointment clash and the next appointment they could give me was then towards end of Jan.  The date of the naturalisation certificate was 2nd Feb, so for everything to be accepted took only 13 days. Could be that they had to wait a bit to get enough people in the area (quite a few lived just a few streets from me) for the presentation in the local town hall.

 

I have to say the whole procedure from start to finish was pain free with efficient and pleasant staff. When you consider it only costs around €500 for everything (application fee, Language test, Citizenship test, translation of birth certificate (I offered to do that myself :) ), passport and ID Card -  it puts the £1282 fee just for the application in the UK to shame :o  .

 

HMS Brexshit can sink away all it likes now without taking me down with it.

 

Hope all that are in the system get sorted soon.  

 

Gib

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23 hours ago, Gib said:

 

 

HMS Brexshit can sink away all it likes now without taking me down with it.

 

 

 

I am SO looking forward to being in the position to say this, exactly what I think.

 

Let 'em stew in their own juices (so longer as I am hedged with my DEU passport!)

 

 

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It's also the passport with the most travel freedom at the moment, so that's a bonus. Of course, after Brexit, your freedom to live and work will be immensely greater than with just a UK passport.

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4 minutes ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

 Of course, after Brexit, your freedom to live and work will be immensely greater than with just a UK passport.

 

How do you know this ?

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