Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

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Well, according to this website, one has to actively register the child within one year of birth if born abroad, and the parents are born abroad: http://www.germany.info/Vertretung/usa/en/05__Legal/02__Directory__Services/02__Citizenship/Birth__Citizenship.html. So, essentially it can be passed on, but only with the parent's willful action of registering the child. If one does not know about this, for example, I suppose the child will not become German (like by birth in the Americas), unless it would otherwise be stateless, like birth everywhere else in most cases.

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Interesting. I did not know this. It's the first time I hear about such a distinction about German nationals and place of birth. But you are correct, it is very important to know!

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It gets more complicated...

I was born in Germany in a British military hospital to a serving officer.

Mr RL Born inUK.  

child  one - born here in Germany registered through U.K. Military

child two - born in uk

child three - born inDE but no military connection.

 

does that mean then that child three (and possibly number one too) can't pass on their U.K. Nationality? Their child then would have to take the nationality of the other parent and have no choice? 

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Don't know, but the US also has physical presence rules for the parent(s) for citizenship by descent. I spent at least five years in the US, two of which were after the age of fourteen, so my child born anywhere is automatically a US citizen since I can document this physical presence. Otherwise, nope, unless the child would be rendered stateless. This is the rule for one US citizen parent, and the parents are married. For two married US citizens, it's a lot easier. Then, there are rules for unmarried moms, and dads. All different. Really annoying.

 

But, if not a citizen by birth, the child can become a citizen through expedited naturalization, but that involves travel to the US and other stuff.

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Just now, kaffeemitmilch said:

Woo! Got my telc B1 certificate today - 93% baby. Now for the other stupid test.

 

Congrats from a 100%er. ;)

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Congrats too. I've read really good german skills can reduce your residence requirements from 8 down to 6 years. Surely it can't be as simple as get a sehr gut at B1 and they waive your 8 years down to 6. Has anyone been successful in having years residency reduced this way? It sounds too good to be true.

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1 hour ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

Hah, really? You must be an elf or something else magical!

 

Now you've offended the mudbloods. :ph34r:

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2 hours ago, europaeuropa said:

Congrats too. I've read really good german skills can reduce your residence requirements from 8 down to 6 years. Surely it can't be as simple as get a sehr gut at B1 and they waive your 8 years down to 6. Has anyone been successful in having years residency reduced this way? It sounds too good to be true.

 

I found this: http://www.eschwege.de/city_info/webaccessibility/index.cfm?region_id=219&waid=28&item_id=850431&link_id=213549440&design_id=3461&contrast=0

 

According to what it says there, you can apply after 7 years if you completed the integrationskurs or after 6 years if you have good German skills like B2 or better.  There is a list of acceptable proof there.

 

If you have been married to a German for at least 2 years, you may apply after 3 years in Germany.

 

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@LeonG

yes, that's correct. I passed the B1 exam and Leben in Deutschland test privately and then asked BAMF to provide me an Integration course certificate. You can't apply for the certificate directly, this has to be done via VHS. So i went to the VHS through which i had taken Leben in Deutschland test and requested them to order this certificate from BAMF. Once i received the certificate i was eligible to apply for German nationality after 7 years instead of 8. Below is the link from BAMF as well.

 

http://www.bamf.de/DE/Willkommen/Einbuergerung/InDeutschland/indeutschland-node.html 

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Greetings

 

For anyone interested in NRW, this morning I gladly too part in a Citizenship ceremony in Cologne ,which was a very enjoyable and laughter full experience. It was 3 months to the day since I put my papers in, which is not too bad I guess.  I shall be enjoying a few beers tonight in celebration. :D

 

Gib

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On 30.3.2017 22:13:22, Erdmann said:

 

Congrats from a 100%er. ;)

 

So you can understand when the lady on the platform tells you that the train is on Gleis Drei?

 

How'd you do on the Einbürgerungstest, smartypants??

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13 minutes ago, Gib said:

Greetings

 

For anyone interested in NRW, this morning I gladly too part in a Citizenship ceremony in Cologne ,which was a very enjoyable and laughter full experience. It was 3 months to the day since I put my papers in, which is not too bad I guess.  I shall be enjoying a few beers tonight in celebration. :D

 

Gib

 

 

Well done (HATE YOU!)

 

I got my first response in MUC almost 12 months to the day since I handed my documents over.

 

"Unfortunately", my second son was born three days before I got my response, so the "change in circumstances" since 2016 for me was, obviously, the new baby.  

Now I have to wait for our Elterngeldbescheid and send that over.  That will take some time.

 

The worst of it though:  I need to prove that I am no longer a Saffer, even though I was naturalised in London in 1991 as a Brit.   

 

Its amazing what you can learn when under the cosh.  A quick google satisfied me that according to SA law, I automatically lost my SA citizenship the moment I was naturlised in the UK without a special dispensation from the the Dept of Home Affairs in SA to keep my SA citizenship.

 

So far so good. But with the German authorities, a print-out of the South African Law will obviously not wash.  I need a confirmation that I am no longer South African. It is obviously a popular issue, because the SA website in Germany explains all of the above, including providing a link to the form you need to send in to "Determine your Citzenship."

 

Now the best part:  once you have sent your forms to Pretoria (which I did by private courier costing over €60), you need to wait SIX TO NINE FRIGGING MONTHS for the piece of paper that confirms you lost your citizenship when you were naturalised elsewhere.  Then get it offcially translated for another €100 - which I could do myself because it will be one sentence long!!!

 

I had a gut feeling this old SA-issue would come up, and it did.  Now my early joke about being in race against Brexit isn't so funny.

 

 

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On 30.3.2017, 23:52:47, europaeuropa said:

Congrats too. I've read really good german skills can reduce your residence requirements from 8 down to 6 years. Surely it can't be as simple as get a sehr gut at B1 and they waive your 8 years down to 6. Has anyone been successful in having years residency reduced this way? It sounds too good to be true.

 

Every region has a different requirement regarding this.

In Munich if you want the residence requirement reduced from 8 years to 6 years, you need to provide proof of language skills of B2 and above (a high score on a B1 exam does not count) AND provide evidence that you are active in social/community work. You need to fulfill BOTH these requirements.

 

I passed the Goethe B2 test in 2012 (probably C1 now) and I have been actively involved in social work since 2014. I qualified to apply for citizenship after 6 years. I never did an integration course. I submitted the application in January 2017 and it is currently being processed. They told me it will take 6-12 months.

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44 minutes ago, More tea, Vicar? said:

So you can understand when the lady on the platform tells you that the train is on Gleis Drei?

 

How'd you do on the Einbürgerungstest, smartypants??

 

Not too bad, I'd say. :unsure:

 

test 123.jpg

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I heard from a Brit who naturalized last summer that it took 3 months to process in Frankfurt (which is done in Darmstadt).

 

Mt,V?: I think it'll cost you a lot less for a translation from English.

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I've done this in Cologne too.  I submitted all the required documents on 26 January and received a letter on 17 March to confirm that everything had been accepted.  The presentation was then on 31 March.  I celebrated all day with a couple of friends, it was fab :)  The date on the certificate is 8 February so it didn't take them long to process everything.

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