Brexit / Applying for German citizenship

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Think you are all clear to stay until daughter 18.  Which opens a pretty huge window to get to B1.    Honestly it is OK.   

 

 

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4 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

Does anyone know if there is anyway out of taking the B1 exam. I tried to learn German for 3 months and i think there is no way I could pass the B1 exam. If you fail the B1 exam is that it and you can´t get residency ? 

You TRIED to learn German for three  months, Renegade? Past tense?

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Just ask your wife to only speak in German with you - you will be fluent in no time :)

Also try reading a tabloid newspaper like Bild - the German in it is quite simple.

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http://www.dw.com/de/deutsch-lernen/harry/s-13219

 

Takes you from the start through to b1, for free, repeat as often as you need. Warning, Harry starts as a total waster with really crapDeutsch but quickly gets better (clearly practicing extra in his cartoon world, sneaky cheat) and you might well need help from the wife to do the written stuff correctly. It is very good, and thorough, and includes some writing.

 

We should have a B1 thread, with tips and writing examples...

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2 hours ago, PandaMunich said:

Also try reading a tabloid newspaper like Bild - the German in it is quite simple.

Great headlines with superb German grammar like "Wir sind Papst!"

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9 hours ago, john g. said:

You TRIED to learn German for three  months, Renegade? Past tense?

 

I tried, did my best,

 

Can`t get my head round all this der, die das switching in mid sentence. Why would anyone do that ?

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I agree with @kiplette that it would be good, especially now, to have a dedicated B1 thread to cover a lot of these questions / concerns.  You probably have half the course already set if you talk a bunch to your German wife (the listening and speaking parts) and the reading isn't too bad since it's mostly mix and match stuff.  Since they don't take the exam book away until the end, you can also borrow a bunch of text from the other sections to help get the der, die, das declinations down for your writing.  If you have a bit of time, also head over to duolingo and it can help you get to B1.  I've also got most of a sample B1 test digitized if you have a place you'd like it uploaded to. 

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48 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

 

I tried, did my best,

 

Can`t get my head round all this der, die das switching in mid sentence. Why would anyone do that ?

I feel your pain.  I struggle with my own mother tongue, so learning German was torture.  I work in the Pharma industry so I could get away without learning German for a longtime.  I moved jobs internally a few years ago and I made the conscious effort to only speak German with my new colleagues, that was Step 1.  

Step 2:  Watch films in German with English subtitles.  

Step 3: Since I also want to become a German citizen I needed my B1, so I registered at the Volkshochschule for night course at the A2/B1 level (1 hour a week/ 10 weeks).

Step 4:  I used the App "Duolingo" https://de.duolingo.com/ to keep my learning going.  

Step 5:  I took a course to prepare myself for how the test is carried out "Vorbereitungskurs DTZ zur Einbürgerung".  This really helped.

 

One of the best decisions I made is too take the TELC B1 test as this exam is more forgiving that the B1 test from the "Goethe institut".

Finally practice mock TELC exams all the time:

https://www.telc.net/fileadmin/user_upload/telc_deutsch_b1_zd_uebungstest_1.pdf

https://www.telc.net/en/candidates/language-examinations/tests/detail/zertifikat-deutsch-telc-deutsch-b1.html#t=2

 

I was so worried about my grammar (speaking/writing) and the writing part itself (I still only write in English at work), but it all worked out in the end, I did my B1 test in December 2016.  The test I had was right up my street and the letter choice (you need to pick 1 from 2 options on the test) was something similar I had practiced. In the end i got:

 

44/45 for Listening/Reading (I found this the easiest part, but the "Vorbereitungskurs" course helped here)

17/20 for Writing (spelling and grammar is not the focus, writing about the bullet points is more important)

93/100 for Speaking (just talk a lot, grammar is only a small part of the mark)

 

So it can be done, but you might need to start slowly.  Perseverance is the key, I still do not understand the German grammar and probably never will and I make mistakes everyday while speaking.  It took me a long time to get my head around the fact that it is OK to make mistakes and to be not so hard on myself.  Most Germans are happy when a foreigner tries to speak German no matter how badly.

 

Sorry for the long winded reply, but hope this helps.  Some people have a natural gift for languages (not me), others need to put the effort in, not matter how frustrating it is.   I will be doing my "einbürgerungstest"  this Friday.  Once I have passed this, it will complete my citizenship application which I have already handed in.  

 

Believe in yourself, you can do it. Best of luck!

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1 hour ago, Macca-bb said:

Watch films in German with English subtitles.  

 

It would also be useful if you could watch English language films with German subtitles. Unfortunately German TV doesn't seem to do this which is why I never watch it .- although I still need to pay for it !! (Rant over)

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Yes, this was a big part of why I learned Dutch a lot faster, as I watched English TV but was constantly reading the Dutch subtitles. It was great! here, I have to watch Tatort while reading the really badly done German subtitles, so I'm concentrating on listening and reading a foreign language at the same time.

 

I'm talking my B1 test on the 25th, and the Leben in Deutschland one two months later. Studying is going slowly... am a bit scared, but I bought the TELC book, and am sort of using this interesting blog: https://yourdailygerman.com/. I also got Teach Yourself German. Good series - it's how I learned Dutch.

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I used a practice book that you can buy on Amazon. It is really helpful to get the pattern down.

https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/3060203741/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

There are also available free online practice tests.

https://www.telc.net/pruefungsteilnehmende/sprachpruefungen/pruefungen/detail/deutsch-test-fuer-zuwanderer-a2-b1.html#t=2

And here everything that says Version 1 is free to download.

https://www.telc.net/en/shop/german.html
 

I did the license with TELC for examiner and rater. I can tell you that the primary issues at this level are functionality in speaking and listening and communicative design. I do NOT recommend going into the test without having a partner with whom you have done some planning for the oral test. On the written test, I will give you a little hint/tip/cheat (if you see it that way): as you are finishing your multiple guess section, one of the last parts will be reading an email or some such. Make mental note (if not physical notes) on your free-writing page about any structures with which you are not 100% comfortable. My testing center botched my test proctoring and we were left with the book on our desks to look at through the free writing section and I could refer back and forth for any grammar. 
 

DO NOT write fewer than 80 words on your written section. My personal opinion as a teacher of tech writing and business correspondence is that this is an awful habit to build, but you will be failed on this section if you write too few words.

DO NOT omit any section that they indicate you have to write.

On the spoken section, have a prepared introductory speech that has been vetted by a person with good German language skills. Learn the names of things that could be in the photos - mostly items of furniture, types of locations (e.g., house, apartment, office, living room, etc.). When you are describing the photos, don't waste time trying to get fancy with spatial adjectives. You won't lose points, but you might get yourself more nervous than this test merits. Meet with your partner in advance and discuss how you will conduct a general conversation, who will start, what will be the phrases you will use to indicate the end of your dialogue, and what you will do if you disagree on the topic.

 

This test is a walk in the park and the examiners are under pressure to pass you.

 

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@RenegadeFurther They give you an envelope for your smartphone. You must turn the phone off, put it in the envelope, seal the envelope, and sign your name on it. They keep these until the test is finished. You MUST have your passport or some national ID card that is accepted as identification in Germany. Aufenthaltstitel and driver's licenses are not accepted. One of my classmates was refused entry into the test because he failed to read the instructions and showed up only with his Aufenthaltstitel card. Man, was he pissed off. 

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3 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

@AlexTr

 

How close are the desks ? Is it possible to see other peoples answers ?

https://www.telc.net/fileadmin/user_upload/Informationsmaterial/general_terms_and_conditions_examination_regulations_july_2015.pdf

 

All candidates have to be assigned their seats in such a way that they cannot view the papers of other candidates. There has to be a distance of at least 1.50 meters between the candidates (to the front, to the back, to the left and to the right) as measured from the centre of the candidates’ seats. This also applies if screens are placed between the candidates.

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@RenegadeFurther The set up is dictated by the DVV telc. The desks cannot be closer to each other than about 1.5 meter. In the set up for the room I took my test in had four desks across all the way to the back of the room. I am estimating. It was not possible for me to see other people's tests, but, then again, I wasn't looking, either.

You are assigned a seat. It will never be near your testing partner. My seat wasn't near anyone i had been to class with.

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From today I am not only British but also German.

 

Been working at it since September - so in total it took around 5 months to get documents, pass exams and the get the Amt to process.

Letter arrived - and I can now take another day off work and drive to the Kreisamt (35Km)

and collect my new certificate of nationality.

 

Then off to local Rathaus to start the ID Card process.

 

Doesn't feel very different this morning :unsure:

 

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