Heart attack at the age of 41

279 posts in this topic

3 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

So it now looks like the statins are somehow damaging my liver (ALT/AST levels are becoming elavated).

 

Does anyone know how to lower the ALT/AST levels and take statins?

 

I have one beer a night just in case there are any wise jokes about the amount of alcohol I drink.

 

Cardio says exercise but that for me is tough.

Why is exercise tough? Time, motivation or physical ability?

 

After my husband’s heart attacks, he had none of the above though his cardio stressed the importance of exercise, weight loss to within a normal BMI range, quality sleep, healthy balanced diet, low-no alcohol, no smoking, drugs etc.

 

We bought an exercise bike that is ideal for any weather, time and intensity. Usually plenty available on eBay Kleinanzeigen...often hardly used.  If boring, place in front of TV!


How’s your diet? My husband isn’t all too consistent with healthy eating though has improved a lot.  He liked the books and BBC series (on youtube, Doctor in the House) by Dr Rangan Chatterjee, British GP.

 

Since adopting more healthy habits, his last test results showed a vast improvement including liver function.

 

 

 

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22 minutes ago, Krieg said:

I am not sure what's the exercise situation because you didn't elaborate and just closed that door, but exercising does not mean running a marathon every second day.  Even if your condition was not the best you could start by taking short walks or whatever that move you SLIGHTLY more than normal and when you get used to that then increase it a tiny little bit until you reach something you consider enough and can make it a routine.

 

Walking is a great exercise. I'm not a gym person, nor do I run, but I like to walk.  It's really a matter of moving more than you do now and finding something you enjoy doing. Everybody is different, you just need to find what you feel you could get into a habit of doing.

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4 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

So it now looks like the statins are somehow damaging my liver (ALT/AST levels are becoming elavated).

 

Does anyone know how to lower the ALT/AST levels and take statins?

 

I have one beer a night just in case there are any wise jokes about the amount of alcohol I drink.

 

Cardio says exercise but that for me is tough.

 

On the assumption you are taking the statins for high cholesterol It would be very good if you could get it down with what you eat so as to eliminate the need for the statins or at least lower the dosage. Speak to your GP so you can monitor your cholesterol levels on a regular basis while you try changing your diet and see how it goes. It is possible to get off the statins, they gave me muscle pain which added to the problem since it made exercise even less attractive.

 

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6 hours ago, keith2011 said:

 

On the assumption you are taking the statins for high cholesterol It would be very good if you could get it down with what you eat so as to eliminate the need for the statins or at least lower the dosage.

There are many cases where it has nothing to do with diet.

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4 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

There are many cases where it has nothing to do with diet.

 

Maybe but I'm not talking about weight, a typical northern European diet contains many things that do cause high cholesterol. Cutting those out can and usually will lower cholesterol levels, reducing the need for a medication which has nasty side effects.

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But not always. Some people are unlucky in the genetic lottery, such as my former husband, his father, his brother and his nephews. All had high cholesterol despite diet, father had triple bypass age 42 (is now 83!), the rest are on statins to lower their cholesterol as diet alone could not make enough difference. My former husband has had six stents and is slim and fit - he had angina aged 38. It’s not always your ‘fault’ because of your diet.

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5 hours ago, keith2011 said:

a typical northern European diet contains many things that do cause high cholesterol. 

 

Bread, pasta, rice, and potatoes for example.    Beer should be replaced with dry red wine.  

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6 hours ago, keith2011 said:

a typical northern European diet contains many things that do cause high cholesterol

 

16 minutes ago, balticus said:

Bread, pasta, rice

 

And these things are just as prevalent in a southern European diet. ;)

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1 hour ago, balticus said:

 

Bread, pasta, rice, and potatoes for example.    Beer should be replaced with dry red wine.  

Curious, this info from the UK NHS specifically recommends eating more bread, pasta and brown rice to reduce high cholesterol. Just goes to show that it is not just here in TT that opinions differ.:rolleyes:

What I was referring to in a northern european diet was things like fatty red meats and processed foods with high fat content.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/high-cholesterol/how-to-lower-your-cholesterol/

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High cholesterol is often as much a matter of genetics as eating, as described here by Johns Hopkins.

 

Quote

This condition is called familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). FH occurs because of a genetic defect on chromosome 19. It’s an inherited disorder that makes it harder for your body to remove LDL or “bad” cholesterol from your blood. The result? From childhood, cholesterol builds up along the walls of your arteries and veins, narrowing the passageways and drastically increasing your risk of heart attack or stroke at a very early age.

 

Ethnicity can also play a role, according to the Heart Association.

 

Quote

The guidelines, issued in November by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association and 10 other health organizations, include a separate section that outlines how race and specific ethnic characteristics may influence a person's risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. For example, South Asians living in the U.S. generally have lower levels of "good" HDL cholesterol than their white counterparts.

The guidelines also make clear distinctions among different Asian ethnicities. They note people of South Asian descent – those from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka – have a higher risk of developing heart disease than the general American population. People with Japanese backgrounds, meanwhile, are more likely to be sensitive to statin drugs used to treat cholesterol and may require lower dosing.

The guidelines also recognize that individuals who identify as Hispanic or Latino fall into a diverse population group that includes people from white, black and Native American races.

 

Now, if RF is part of either of these at-risk groups, this may very well be a damned if you do and if you don't situation.

 

In these cases, giving up alcohol, dairy, and meat 100% may be the only thing he can do to help himself.

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Last year I had very high (bad) cholesterol in 2 consecutive blood tests. But I am slim (BMI 21), I do a mediterranean, low carb diet and enough exercise.

My parents both take pills to control the cholesterol, despite not being obese and despite having a very healthy diet.

I was about to go on this pills thing when a 3rd and 4th blood test came back almost normal, so for the moment I am keeping it under watch but I have no question that in my case it is due to genetics.

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Seems to me the preceding posts are classic and typical excuses to not stop eating things we like even though we know they may not be good for us. Personally I am sure there are great health benefits from eating my favourite meal of Steak and Kidney pie, chips and baked beans washed down with a couple of pints of bitter despite some people saying the opposite.:D

Sadly such delightful dishes are not generally available here in Germany, which may explain why I'm still living.

Give a change of diet a chance, at worst the only thing you may loose is a bit of weight.

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I´m three weeks into a lot of exercise, low carb, low calorie, one meal a day and then only half.

I call it my Auschwitz Diät and it´t working quite well. At least I hope, because of furlough I can´t get into the company to get to the loading scale for the trucks to weigh myself.

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On 30/06/2020, 08:10:12, keith2011 said:

Curious, this info from the UK NHS specifically recommends eating more bread, pasta and brown rice to reduce high cholesterol.

 

Horrifying.  

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23 hours ago, balticus said:

 

Horrifying.  

I am not so sure, as I understand it the really big contributors to high cholesterol in the diet are things like red meat, diary, processed food with heavy amounts of unsaturated fats and everything from McDonalds! For sure bread, pasta, rice and potatoes are high on carbohydrates but not I think to the same extent for cholesterol.

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11 hours ago, keith2011 said:

For sure bread, pasta, rice and potatoes are high on carbohydrates but not I think to the same extent for cholesterol.

 

Check the links posted above.

 

What happens when you eat carbs, e.g. a bowl.of rice or a plate of pasta?

 

 

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15 hours ago, balticus said:

 

Check the links posted above.

 

What happens when you eat carbs, e.g. a bowl.of rice or a plate of pasta?

I did

Quote:-

"Acute increases in carbohydrate consumption will increase blood insulin concentrations, thereby perhaps increasing total cholesterol and LDL-C production"

 

"Acute", "perhaps", not exactly very convincing.

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