The English Teacher's Corner

246 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, tor said:

An interesting article from NPR about sentence diagrams.

 

sentence1.jpg.9b2eefef38da214297762bed6c

The diagrammed sentence is itself a form of monstrous vermin, legs and all. 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awfully long, but it does explain through example the grammar of what is happening.

 

A dangling participle walks into a bar. Enjoying a cocktail and chatting with the bartender, the evening passes pleasantly.

A bar was walked into by the passive voice.

An oxymoron walked into a bar, and the silence was deafening.

Two quotation marks walk into a “bar.”

A malapropism walks into a bar, looking for all intensive purposes like a wolf in cheap clothing, muttering epitaphs and casting dispersions on his magnificent other, who takes him for granite.

Hyperbole totally rips into this insane bar and absolutely destroys everything.

A question mark walks into a bar?

A non sequitur walks into a bar. In a strong wind, even turkeys can fly.

Papyrus and Comic Sans walk into a bar. The bartender says, "Get out -- we don't serve your type."

A mixed metaphor walks into a bar, seeing the handwriting on the wall but hoping to nip it in the bud.

A comma splice walks into a bar, it has a drink and then leaves.

Three intransitive verbs walk into a bar. They sit. They converse. They depart.

A synonym strolls into a tavern.

At the end of the day, a cliché walks into a bar -- fresh as a daisy, cute as a button, and sharp as a tack.

A run-on sentence walks into a bar it starts flirting. With a cute little sentence fragment.

Falling slowly, softly falling, the chiasmus collapses to the bar floor.

A figure of speech literally walks into a bar and ends up getting figuratively hammered.

An allusion walks into a bar, despite the fact that alcohol is its Achilles heel.

The subjunctive would have walked into a bar, had it only known.

A misplaced modifier walks into a bar owned a man with a glass eye named Ralph.

The past, present, and future walked into a bar. It was tense.

A dyslexic walks into a bra.

A verb walks into a bar, sees a beautiful noun, and suggests they conjugate. The noun declines.

An Oxford comma walks into a bar, where it spends the evening watching the television getting drunk and smoking cigars.

A simile walks into a bar, as parched as a desert.

A gerund and an infinitive walk into a bar, drinking to forget.

A hyphenated word and a non-hyphenated word walk into a bar and the bartender nearly chokes on the irony.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my students read an article about Warren Buffet for homework. She is about 35, a C1, in the finance dept. of a major aviation company. She said 'I came across this abbreviation and I had to google it. I feel so stupid' She wrote ww II on the white board.   

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This reminds me of a tale I heard a couple of years ago:  An American teacher was introducing an American astronaut to her pupils.  She read highlights from his cv and mentioned that he was a World War Eleven hero.  I have no reason to believe the authenticity of this tale, but it made me laugh.

 

On Friday a lady in my English conversation class (I think she's 78) asked me what "All fur coat and no knickers" meant!  I suspect she was trying to embarrass me!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a serious question for all you English teachers out there.

 

In my job we are required to do some translating from German to English. Not much, and not technical, just a few sentences per day - but it comes up all the time.  I am the only one on the team who is a native English speaker. Among my native German colleagues, the results range from kind of OK intelligible thanks to the miracle of Google Translate, to text that approaches native fluency.  So there is a wide range of competence.

 

Our supervisor would like everyone on our team to improve their translating. He has the idea that since I'm a native English speaker and can translate the best, I can teach the others how to translate.  I've said I'd give it a stab, but it's been more like a flail.  I don't know how to teach, period.  So I'm wondering:  do you know of any courses that are effective in teaching German - English translation, without being part of some serious programme leading to translator qualifications and involving a long-term commitment?  Something that perhaps might fit into the German Bildungsurlaub thing?  I'm about to contact a few language schools to see what they have to say, but thought one of you might have a suggestion.   

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an impossible request by your supervisor. Only native English speakers can translate perfectly from German to English. I have been an English teacher in Germany for 20 years, and when I have to send an important email or letter to somebody in German, I always ask my German wife to look at my  text. She ALWAYS finds a few errors, (although I try my very best).

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@silty1 Get your colleagues using Deepl.com translator. At least then you'll improve them by about 50% without effort.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do some work for one of the major translation houses, I can ask if they have ever considered offering a seminar.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/04/2018, 09:52:34, tor said:

One of my students read an article about Warren Buffet for homework. She is about 35, a C1, in the finance dept. of a major aviation company. She said 'I came across this abbreviation and I had to google it. I feel so stupid' She wrote ww II on the white board.   

 

I can actually sympathise with her: Firstly, the Roman numerals make this example tricky. Secondly, abbreviations and the like only make sense when you actually know what the letters stand for and are much harder to work out from the context than a word. This is doubly the case if English is not your native language and it's an English abbreviation.

 

PS I hope you corrected the abbreviation ;-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Acton said:

This is an impossible request by your supervisor. Only native English speakers can translate perfectly from German to English. I have been an English teacher in Germany for 20 years, and when I have to send an important email or letter to somebody in German, I always ask my German wife to look at my  text. She ALWAYS finds a few errors, (although I try my very best).

 

Hi Acton,

Yes, I know that it's always best to have a native speaker translating into the target language, but perfection isn't what we're after.  A way to measurably improve things from the level we are at now is what we're looking for.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, tor said:

I do some work for one of the major translation houses, I can ask if they have ever considered offering a seminar.

Hi Tor,

Thanks! Looking forward to see what they have to say. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, AlexTr said:

@silty1 Get your colleagues using Deepl.com translator. At least then you'll improve them by about 50% without effort.

 

I google deeple.com and get a website showing this great little gizmo you attach to things you might lose so you can find them easily again.  Not sure what you mean by their translator.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now