The English Teacher's Corner

262 posts in this topic

W. S. Gilbert (of Gilbert & Sullivan) didn't think so!

 

"There was an old man of St. Bees

Who was stung on his arm by a wasp.

When asked, "Does it hurt?",

He replied, "No, it doesn't;

But I'm so glad it wasn't a hornet."

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25 words that are their own opposites

 

1. Sanction (via French, from Latin sanctio(n-), from sancire ‘ratify,’) can mean ‘give official permission or approval for (an action)’ or conversely, ‘impose a penalty on.’

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A student brought in this article and we had a great time discussing the descriptive language, and then we listened to a few musical selections.

 

"Even as a young girl, Oliveros was tuning in to her entire environment, what she once called, in a public-radio interview, the “beautiful canopies of sound” that issued from the insects, birds and animals around her; “the whistles and pops” between stations on her grandfather’s crystal radio also had her pricking up her ears. It was this erratic panoply of incidental and liminal sounds that captured her imagination, yet they couldn’t be expressed by conventional musical notation."

 

 

 

 

 

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This is great! 15 obsolete words we should still be using (PS: have never heard of any of them!!:lol:) but they´re great ANYWAY, OK???:P

What´s your opinion? Any words to add which you would love to see back in fashion?

 

 

I think we should all still be wandering around and saying " I dig you, baby "..but that´s only me...

 

http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/arts-culture/stories/15-obsolete-words-we-should-still-be-using

 

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I was once crapulous after eating a whole bag of Lakritzschnecken! Or should that have been crapyoumore?

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Here is an interesting blog about the pronunciation of the word 'sure'.

 

The vowel occurring in French sure was alien to most Middle English dialects, including the dialect of London, and, as the name of the modern English letter U shows, yu replaced French u in borrowed words.  We can observe this substitution even in such a recent loanword as menu (and compare nubile and other nu- words).  Once sure appeared in English, it turned into syure, and a similar change happened in sugar (syugar)

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fun word pairs

 

Die Spelunke : a dive bar

Spelunker: a cave explorer

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A few more insults:

 

Gobermouch

This is an old Irish term for someone who likes to meddle in other people’s business. Everyone knows a busybody, right?

 

Gnashnab

Gnashnab is an 18th century northern English word, meaning someone who just complains all the time. Contemporary synonyms include nitpicker, moaner and grumbler. It's just as true now as it was back then—no one likes a

 

Snoutband

A snoutband is someone who always interrupts a conversation to correct or contradict the person speaking. Every social group has a snoutband, who thinks they know everything. They probably don't know the meaning of this word, though. At least, not yet.

 

Stampcrab

Someone that's clumsy and heavy of foot would be considered a stampcrab. It sounds like a good band name, doesn't it? More of those coming up, so scroll on.

 

Scobblelotcher

Mental Floss notes this word is "probably derived from 'scopperloit,' an old English dialect word for a vacation or a break from work." A scobberlotcher is someone who avoids hard work like it's their job. The next time you catch someone dozing off at their desk, hit 'em with this one.

 

Whiffle-Whaffle

This is someone who wastes a lot of time. You could easily make the case that a scobblelotcher is also a whiffle-whaffle, correct? Or would that be a ... whiffle-whaffler?

 

Zooterkins

The website Matador Network says this is "a 17th century variant of ‘zounds’ which was an expression of surprise or indignation." It's less of an insult and more of something to yell after someone has insulted you...but of course you can follow up with some other great words of your own.

 

Zounderkite

This is a Victorian word meaning idiot. This is an appropriate example with a contemporary angle, spoken with some irritation while driving on the highway: "That zounderkite just cut me off!"

 

Bedswerver

Shakespeare coined this one to describe an adulterer. BBC America thinks this would make a great band name, and they are totally on the mark. You're at the show, the lights go down, and suddenly through the swirling fog and darkness you hear “Good evening Cincinnati, how ya doing? We…are…Bedswerver!”

 

Fopdoodle

A fopdoodle is someone of little significance. So if you're letting someone get on your nerves that really shouldn't have the power, remember that they're just a fopdoodle. Then carry on.

 

Klazomaniac

This would be a person WHO CAN ONLY SPEAK BY SHOUTING. That's all we're going to say ABOUT THAT!

 

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On ‎12‎/‎15‎/‎2015‎ ‎5‎:‎40‎:‎22‎, katheliz said:

The word "decimated" gets no respect.  I recently heard a TV broadcaster say, "The town was almost completely decimated."
My oldest son, Erstling, informed me that decimated means the loss of 1/10.  I just smiled, because two years ago he insisted it means the loss of 9/10.  

And what is Ms?  Sorry quoted wrong post and cant change it. I know what Mr, Miss and Mrs mean but what is Ms? I hear a lot of tomfoolery when it comes to this salutation.

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Ms.  has been in use for some time. Useful if you do not wish your title to be recognisable as married or single.  A neutral title. When men use Mr., it does not denote their marital status. That's all.

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On ‎2016‎-‎11‎-‎06‎ ‎4‎:‎36‎:‎00‎, tor said:

The struggles of a teacher.

581ef97139bf7_mydick1.jpg.9be86e61836f12

Teacher- no comment on spelling of friend??  I guess he was laughing too much!

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