The English Teacher's Corner

253 posts in this topic

Do you think the people in Ernst & Young are kinaesthetic and visual learners? Ah, wait, sorry. In order for you to be able to give that answer, you would have to understand the VAK test, the learning patterns of each of those types, and the types of jobs that each of those types do. You clearly haven't investigated teaching beyond your topic. They should be mystified why you would focus on spatial prepositions. They don't MAKE things nor do they describe how they are made.

Look, whatever issue you are having is just not at all interesting. 

 

By the way, most large multinationals do not enjoy their suppliers bandying their names about. You might want to put that in check.

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tor, although I like using podcasts too, research has shown that people learn in different ways and we, as trainers, need to provide different activities to help each person learn as best they can, which I believe AlexTr is trying to explain.

 

I’ve been doing this job for over 25 years and I’ve learned a lot about people and how they absorb information, in fact, I wish I’d known more about this when my kids were younger, I might have been able to help them more in school. 

 

I teach in large companies too and often have my box of figures and die to use if I need to, I’m also well known for having various cards with me to use in classes, at every level.  When presented in the right way, these props work really well and by using them, teachers are giving each person what they need to take in whatever is being taught.

 

We’re all good trainers, I’ve no doubt of that, but we all have our different ways of approaching this job, so please don’t disrespect someone else’s methods.  We have to be open to new ideas, even if we don’t understand them at first.

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Tap, I also use index cards with complete sentences written word-by-word (one word each card) for my visual learners as a method to teach sentence structure. If the method employed in German schools right now actually was 100% effective, we wouldn't have jobs. We also wouldn't have adult learners with the paralyzing fear of failure that we have now. It is entirely a failure of how people are taught the craft of teaching that they believe that telling is the same as teaching. Telling and retelling does not work for 60% of learners. Repetition does not build understanding. I always say that a language teacher must teach what, when, how, and why. It is incumbent upon us as service providers in the education industry to meet our learners where they are and not where we want them to be.

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Why don't we all just agree there are different kinds of English courses and teachers?

I'm much more interested in the various tips and methods than the defense of any specific flavo(u)r. :) 

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Why don't we all just agree there are different kinds of English courses and teachers?

I'm much more interested in the various tips and methods than the defense of any specific flavo(u)r. :) 

Hey, I am still completely unclear about why what I said would not work for my classes caused such a glitch. I am entirely unfazed by the fact that financial auditors would not benefit from the methods I use with engineers.

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tor, although I like using podcasts too, research has shown that people learn in differnt ways

 

Why don't we all just agree there are different kinds of English courses and teachers?

 :) 

That is the reason I started this thread. If you are in the English business, or only teach business English, helpful posts are welcome.

 

Here is another one that Alex can shoot down, for whatever reason.

 

I am currently working with a lawyer who loves to solve puzzles. I have tried several different word jumble generators and I like what this one can do. You can cut and paste whole sentences, and you can scramble the order of the words, just the letters, or both.

 

lcitntleluea / potrprye

ptrypreo / ighrst / which / fo / a / lruest / teffro / aer / atliltneulec / aetiigblnn

 

 

 

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(do stop snarking, everybody)

 

Yikes, the letter jumble is hard even for me as a native speaker.

I need to try this, and the VAK test on Mr Metall -imho he's an auditory learner, as in doing very well in spoken explainations and dialogs.

I successfully homeschooled him right up to college level  English and 90% in the TOEFL test after German school pretty much failed on him.

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lcitntleluea / potrprye

ptrypreo / ighrst / which / fo / a / lruest / teffro / aer / atliltneulec / aetiigblnn

 

Looks like my typing when I put my fingers in the wrong place on the keyboard. LOL

 

I only got these: of / a / are / rights / effrot (ha ha, jk on that last one).

And that was WITHOUT cheating.

 

Then I cheated with an online word jumbler and, surprise surprise, it didn't find a word for "lruest", which was the first one I tried to solve. Or "lcitntleluea". After that, I gave up.

Math looks easy to me now. Snark snark.

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I pull out the definitions and sentences while we are discussing the topic and try to throw him off his feet, or make him think on his feet. I often do it when he is about to make a good point or is in a groove, and see how long it takes him to get back in track. And yes, he likes it.

 

 

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I like to use nonverbal cues to correct students. When a student makes a simple past mistake, I swipe my index finger from right to left. When they make a present perfect mistake I hold up four (for) fingers. I also use it for countable and uncountable nouns.

 

Have a nice Monday.

 

 

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That is brilliant. I like the way she has organised that information very much. Really user friendly.

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Hello all,

 

I sometimes use the marshmallow challenge with groups. While strictly speaking not intended as a language exercise, I have found it offers excellent learning opportunities across a range of groups: engineer/tech types, managers, azubis, schoolkids, advanced learners.

 

For anyone who doesn't like clicking on links:

Quote

 

The Marshmallow Challenge is a remarkably fun and instructive design exercise that encourages teams to experience simple but profound lessons in collaboration, innovation and creativity.

The task is simple: in eighteen minutes, teams must build the tallest free-standing structure out of 20 sticks of spaghetti, one yard of tape, one yard of string, and one marshmallow. The marshmallow needs to be on top.

Surprising lessons emerge when you compare teams’ performance. Who tends to do the worst? Why? Who tends to do the best? Why? What improves performance? What kills it?

If you need to kickstart a meeting, get a team into a creative frame of mind, or simply want to encourage your organization to think about what it takes to dramatically increase innovation, invest 45 minutes to run a marshmallow challenge.

 

 

As is often the case, the feedback phase after completing the exercise is often the most valuable. Sometimes I throw students straight into the task and then we review the language and ideas after, whereas with weaker students we spend time much more time pre-teaching some of the required language and preparing them for the task. Depending on the students and the teacher, there's a lot different angles you can take: running a meeting, making suggestions, giving instructions, asking for help, etc., etc.

 

And yes, this exercise is fun!

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I know this isn't a new idea, but my love affair with Taboo will last for eternity.  Just today my love was renewed when I wasn't feeling well and still had a half an hour left to go.  It's a game that never gets old.

 

Oh Taboo, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways...

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8 hours ago, optimista said:

Is that apostrophe right?

It's kind of a Schroedinger's apostrophe.  It's correct for one teacher but incorrect for a plural.  So it's both right and wrong.

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