The English Teacher's Corner

405 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, kiplette said:

We learn beautiful received English.

My people learn that there is a singular form of dice, 'die', they learn that after 'once' and 'twice' comes 'thrice' and that they will be the only people they ever meet who use these correct and rather lovely forms (apart from my younger son, who likes them too).

I can get away with this because they are oldies conversation groups, we have no pressure of exams or needing to make progress, we just tiddle around at A1/2, saying stuff to each other, and very nice it is too.

In my days in France as a  "jeune fille au pair," people enjoyed my use of the Past Historic tense very much and said I spoke very poetically.

 

You can tell your pupils that they are in good company with Mark Twain:

"I went often to look at the collection of curiosities in Heidelberg Castle, and one day I surprised the keeper of it with my German. I spoke entirely in that language. He was greatly interested; and after I had talked a while he said my German was very rare, possibly a "unique"; and wanted to add it to his museum."

(From 'The Awful German Language.')

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1 hour ago, El Jeffo said:

 

Certainly an English teacher from NYC, USA would write emphasize, no? Another riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.

 

Drawing from personal experience and employing Occam's Razor, I know we can leave room for the idea that this person's English is just naturally this deficient. In evidence,  I know an 8th grade teacher in FL who cannot spell or write a grammatically correct sentence, and I argued with two non-native EFL teachers at Berlitz way back in the day that "more better" is not correct English. Language schools can't keep well-educated teachers around, so this is what they get.

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Grammar nazi (and former English teacher) reporting for duty:

7 hours ago, Rushrush said:

In light of the conversation here, an interesting poll question for everyone: Do you emphasize colloquial English or proper grammar to your students? As mentioned, kids vs. children or what vs. which - as in “what room are we in“ vs. "which room are we in". There are more, but I can't think of them offhand.

 

As any decent English teacher knows, that depends on the needs of the student or students. If it's a business course for people who are going to be writing business correspondence, proper grammar is key. If the students want to improve their conversational English, you can point out the nuances expressed by different wording, abbreviations, slang expressions, and so on.

 

Given that you claim to be a genuine 'Murican from New Yawk City, yet write almost exclusively in (poor) British English, I find it exceedingly hard to believe that you're who you claim to be. And that's even before considering all the links to right-wing crank blogs and fake news sites you post here.

 

Teacher, educate thyself.

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3 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

I argued with two non-native EFL teachers at Berlitz way back in the day that "more better" is not correct English. Language schools can't keep well-educated teachers around, so this is what they get.

 

The McSchools are destroying our language!

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20 minutes ago, Feierabend said:

The Awful German Language

That's a very amusing short story and well worth a read. I particularly enjoyed one part where he suggests German sentences end with words such as "haben, sind, gewesen, geworden" as the author's meaningless artistic flourish...and of course for native English speakers, his explanation of grammatical gender brings back memories of German lessons past.

If you have time, here's a link: http://kliebhan.de/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Mark-Twain-Awful-Germn-Language.pdf

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52 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

 

I argued with two non-native EFL teachers at Berlitz way back in the day that "more better" is not correct English.

 

True, dat! The correct way is "Mo', betta!!"

 

I'll get my coat... ;)

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1 hour ago, AlexTr said:

 

Drawing from personal experience and employing Occam's Razor, I know we can leave room for the idea that this person's English is just naturally this deficient. In evidence,  I know an 8th grade teacher in FL who cannot spell or write a grammatically correct sentence, and I argued with two non-native EFL teachers at Berlitz way back in the day that "more better" is not correct English. Language schools can't keep well-educated teachers around, so this is what they get.

I once heard such a „ teacher „ explaining to a student that a millennium is a million years and that it is easy to remember because it begins with „ mill.“😂

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5 hours ago, El Jeffo said:

 

Certainly an English teacher from NYC, USA would write emphasize, no? Another riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.

This is a grey area with -ise and -ize. In British English ( traditionally ), both are common because .. just because!😂 ( One reason being no one learns spelling at school anymore! The other reason- what‘s the rule? A word of Latin or of Greek origin? 😂)

My old seminar sparring partner from da Bronx, Tom, of my generation and with Irish parents , would use both- depending.

 

I think you‘re being a bit uptight there, Jeffo!

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there is no gray area. Tom should have written whatever was standard where he grew up. 

 

North America writes it with a Zee, which y'all call a Zed.  No gray area.  No North American learns to -ise their verbs.  Never.  Nowhere.

 

A Yank who uses both is usually trying to be fancy (and lacks consistency).  You think I don't want to call the apartment a flat?  I do!  I really, really do!  But I won't.  

 

Likewise, Yanks that write -our instead of -or can get stuffed.  So fake and pretentious.  You know who you are.  Fite me IRL or die mad :lol: :ph34r:

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Ok, Dessa! How does Trump write it? ( Assuming he can sometimes spell! SOMETIMES😂.)

 

By the way, „y‘all „ is truly one of my favoUrite US expressions! So inclusive and sweet and tons better than „ vous and Sie and ustedes and all that crap.“🙏🏻

 

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you do realize he's not the Queen, right? There's no such standard as "The President's English," most of the patriotic Americans I know just go ahead and do the exact opposite of whatever he's doing if they want to show love and pride for their country and fellow man ;) 

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He IS a Queen, Dessa! A drama queen!

Anyway, to be honest , he can‘t go before a mike and say „ my husband and I „ as Lizzie does! Not really kosher!😂

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Interesing article explaining how the difference in spelling emphasize and emphasise and other words with the  -ise and -ize suffix evolved:  http://www.differencebetween.net/language/difference-between-emphasize-and-emphasise/

 

Quote

In the nineteenth century, during a period of spelling reform, the distinction in spellings stayed the same in American and Canadian English, but changed in the rest of the English-speaking world. In England, it became more common to use the –ise suffix for words that were originally given the –ize suffix, like in ‘emphasize’, because of the strong French influence. Most other British English dialects – Irish, Australian, New Zealand, etcetera – did the same. However, Oxford University Press, which is influential in England though not enough to make people use their commas, continues to use the –ize suffix in words of Greek origin. The United States and Canada also continue to use both suffixes.

 

To summarize, ‘emphasize’ is the way the word is spelled in the United States and Canada and ‘emphasise’ is the way it is spelled in British English. The word was originally spelled ‘emphasize’, but was later changed due to spelling reform in England and ‘emphasise’ spread throughout the world.


 

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Post of the day, bramble!🙈🙏🏻😂👍🏼.

I love people coming to my rescue! Karma rules!😂

 

( By the way - the next issue is SPELLED or SPELT!)

😂

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I do some work editing and proofreading and our guidelines are, -ise is British spelling and -ize is American. Some people use both, but that's usually because they're unsure themselves as to which they should use.

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1 minute ago, Tap said:

I do some work editing and proofreading and our guidelines are, -ise is British spelling and -ize is American. Some people use both, but that's usually because they're unsure themselves as to which they should use.

 

- that`s what I do too, generally, but the customer is the boss...

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I've never seen -ise in American English. I have seen -ize in British English (those posh Oxford chaps sure go for that American cultural appropriation, having adopted both our comma and the Oxford Z).

 

You're barking up the wrong tree, John. Or do the British say you're woofing up the wrong arboretum?

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_words_of_Greek_origin

 

Back to the Greeks, innit? Who‘d have thought I‘d be arguing for linguistic democracy/ tolerance from a sofa in a medieval Cretan village with a psychopathic French neighbour and suffering from having to clean up the mess after a local cat has just vomited in the patio?😂

Anyway, rettet dem Dativ!👍🏼😂

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22 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

I've never seen -ise in American English. I have seen -ize in British English (those posh Oxford chaps sure go for that American cultural appropriation, having adopted both our comma and the Oxford Z).

 

You're barking up the wrong tree, John. Or do the British say you're woofing up the wrong arboretum?

Just laughing here! Just wondering how both of us would survive discussing this Oxford/ Harvard stuff in a Glaswegian bar!😂 Ten minutes😜maximum!

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36 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

I've never seen -ise in American English. I have seen -ize in British English (those posh Oxford chaps sure go for that American cultural appropriation, having adopted both our comma and the Oxford Z).

 

You're barking up the wrong tree, John. Or do the British say you're woofing up the wrong arboretum?

Puppy Mandy just sussed that out! Didn‘t woof up the wrong arboretum! Just did a dumpez-vous! Mandy is possibly of Norman extraction!

😂

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