The English Teacher's Corner

405 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Smaug said:

 

 

1 hour ago, Smaug said:

I say "shall we go for a coffee" all the time, and I hear it all the time, at least in Britain.

 

Not where I come from Smaug. Maybe you've been in Germany too long? Cake also? 

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@Acton Maybe. My better half, though, lives in Britain and also says "shall I...", "shall we..."

 

I think you might be right; maybe my speech is old-fashioned? I, for example, cringe a bit when I hear "I wish you would say hello" or "I wish he wouldn't do that.", but everyone says that and I presume it's perfectly correct. I would say "I wish you said hello" or "I wish he didn't do that", which is how I learned to say it eons ago when I learned English, which isn't my first language.

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@Acton and what's wrong with cake? :lol:  Britons don't eat cake?  Cake can only be drunk with tea?  What's your point? 

 

 

 

 

Kaffee und Kuchen is one of their better customs and yes I have lived here a long time :ph34r: 

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1 hour ago, Acton said:

 

Not where I come from Smaug. Maybe you've been in Germany too long? Cake also? 

Where exactly are you from , then , Acton? There are regional differences within the UK re popular usage of certain words and even grammatical ideosyncracies.

 

Some people even do a bit of thou-ing and ye-ing to this day!

 

 

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I must congratulate you on your command of English Smaug. Are you from Spain? There's nothing 'old-fashioned' in using the words you did.

I don't want to start an English class here, but your examples would be correct in American English, but nor in Oxford, (snooty land).

There, you should say, 'I wish you'd said...' I wish he hadn't done that'. There is a difference between how we use present/past perfect and past simple in the language which divides us!

John. They say that sarcasm is the lowest form of wit by the way. My comment above was to correct the assumption that British people would normally suggest a beer, not a coffee!

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On 21.8.2020, 16:41:47, Acton said:

 

Not where I come from Smaug. Maybe you've been in Germany too long? Cake also? 

 "Aber bitte mit Sahne!" (with whipped cream on top, please!)

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On 8/21/2020, 11:17:04, Acton said:

HELP!!

We DON'T say could of. We say Could've which sounds like 'of' but is, in fact, HAVE.

Please stop this now.


 

I see the grammar Nazis are out in full force today, I'd hazard a guess that If asked 99 out of a 100 people would say, “it don't matter to me” to which I say “I can't get no satisfaction”. Listening to various regional accents (UK US) I'd Say the vast majority of native speakers don't speak proper English at least according to people here.

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A’

14 minutes ago, Janx Spirit said:

Today? What fucking time zone do you live in?

 

Past imperfect I guess...

My oh my someone's having a bad day, let us look up the definition of the word today 
 

Today 

 

adverb

 

to·day | \ tə-ˈdā  \

Definition of today

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1: on or for this day

2: at the present time

today

 noun

Definition of today (Entry 2 of 3)

: the present day, time, or age today's youth

today

 adjective

Definition of today (Entry 3 of 3)

: of or characteristic of today : NOW

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Well, in fairness to grammar nazis everywhere, rushrush can't spell, either.

 

 

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1 minute ago, AlexTr said:

Well, in fairness to grammar nazis everywhere, rushrush can't spell, either.

 

 

Opps edited

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No. 

 

14 hours ago, Rushrush said:

 

Of course not, but had you read my comment you'd notice actually what I said, people are not as strict with social distancing as when they were. Basicly nobody keeps the required 1.5 meter distance in stores now.  Much like when you first get your DL, you drive very carefully, stop at every stop sign etc, but quickly you start to slip, go a bit over the speed limit, roll through through a stop sign etc.

 

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In light of the conversation here an interesting poll question for everyone. Do you emphasis colloquial English or proper grammar to your students? As mentioned  kids vs children or what vs which - as in “what room are we in“ vs which room are we in. There are more but I can't think of them off hand.

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2 hours ago, Rushrush said:

In light of the conversation here an interesting poll question for everyone. Do you emphasis colloquial English or proper grammar to your students? As mentioned  kids vs children or what vs which - as in “what room are we in“ vs which room are we in. There are more but I can't think of them off hand.

On 21/08/2020, 10:10:29, Metall said:

This guy is an English teacher? With no knowledge of registers of language?

Fake news.

Sad.

 

On 19/08/2020, 23:17:23, Keleth said:

Ok I`m not an English teacher and I stumbled on this thread but there is a couple of things that really bug me...

1.How long has couldWould etc of instead of could/would have existed ?

2.Why are suddenly prospective and perspective interchangeable ?

 

Have these always  been correct or are they new or are they still incorrect but people use them anyway.These 2 things really grate on me when I hear them.Not sure if I`m old and out of touch.

On 19/08/2020, 23:17:23, Keleth said:

Ok I`m not an English teacher and I stumbled on this thread but there is a couple of things that really bug me...

1.How long has couldWould etc of instead of could/would have existed ?

2.Why are suddenly prospective and perspective interchangeable ?

 

Have these always  been correct or are they new or are they still incorrect but people use them anyway.These 2 things really grate on me when I hear them.Not sure if I`m old and out of touch.

On 14/08/2020, 13:25:16, Tap said:

 

I'm back to about 80%, and that's fine for me. As you say, there aren't as many expenses, so it works.

 

What I found interesting is the difference in treatment between the companies I work directly with and the language school I do some work for.  The companies supported me from the very beginning.  I could work online, or come into the company and teach face-to-face, if I felt comfortable about it.  At the moment, I do 5 classes a week online and the other 10 are in company, and I like that combination. I'm disappointed with the language school, I haven't heard from them since April and I've made the decision not to go back there if and/or when they ask. 

 

 

I emphasise (verb) correct English but also teach colloquialisms as, well, colloquial forms of correct English.

Having to correct the mistakes/ignorance/laziness of previous English teachers makes my job that much more difficult.

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We learn beautiful received English.

My people learn that there is a singular form of dice, 'die', they learn that after 'once' and 'twice' comes 'thrice' and that they will be the only people they ever meet who use these correct and rather lovely forms (apart from my younger son, who likes them too).

I can get away with this because they are oldies conversation groups, we have no pressure of exams or needing to make progress, we just tiddle around at A1/2, saying stuff to each other, and very nice it is too.

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3 hours ago, sobyrne said:

I emphasise (verb) correct English but also teach colloquialisms as, well, colloquial forms of correct English.

 

Certainly an English teacher from NYC, USA would write emphasize, no? Another riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.

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Hi All 

 

I‘ve moved out of teaching after 7 years freelancing in the U.K, Middle East & Berlin.

 

I have 2 large boxes containing a wide range of printed resources for levels A1 -C1 and some course, grammar, & listening books with CDs (teacher & student).

 

The above covers EAP (University courses), EFL, Business English,  Exam prep etc etc

 

Thought these may come in handy for anyone teaching full time. 

 

I’ll also post in the for sale section - please drop me a message - it would be such a shame to just store this stuff away !!

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