The English Teacher's Corner

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I thought we could discuss something else other than the VIRUS!!

 

I have always thought that we are battling against the pop/rock culture when it comes to teaching our students the proper use of English.

 

"She doesn't love me any more" is never heard in modern music as it just isn't cool or sexy or whatever. My students are bombarded with "She don't love me no more' and it's quite difficult to wean them away from this as it's harder for people to UNlearn things later.

 

Also, thanks a lot Louis Armstromg for the lines " I see friends shaking hands, saying 'How do you do...' when I tell people all the time that 'How do you do' is said only once in your life to a person you have never met before.

 

Advertising also doesn't help. McDonald's jingle "We're loving it!!" sends shivers down my spine. Trying to teach people that some verbs are stative and some action is blown away after years of patience. "But I heard this on the radio!!!! they protest.

 

Any other examples from my teaching colleagues? Or anyone else?

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I am more worried about native speakers who can‘t distinguish between „ your/ you‘re, there/ their, who‘s/ whose, „ should OF done done/ should have done“ etc. 

Oh, and „ its/it‘s.“

😫

( And then teach the wrong form.)

It is ubiquitous.

However, Acton... „ love „ isn‘t always stative when the song is THAT good!🙏🏻
 

 

 

 

Innit?

 

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1 minute ago, RedMidge said:

I shudder when I hear:

"We should have went".:angry:

 

- my shudder "thing" is:

"I ain`t gonna say nuffin, right?"

 

- but I am sure there are far worse to come! :D

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Just now, robinson100 said:

 

- my shudder "thing" is:

"I ain`t gonna say nuffin, right?"

 

- but I am sure there are far worse to come! :D

OOh- a double negative thread coming up!

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2 minutes ago, RedMidge said:

OOh- a double negative thread coming up!

- might as well be a thread about the German language then, don`t you think? ;-)

 

Another way I have heard the language literally being murdered was when I worked at Heathrow, and the lovely little Philipino ladies working with me would end EVERY sentence with "innit?" Drove me crazy to start with, but one gets used to it!

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“ literally being murdered «, rob?🙏🏻😂

Love ya to bits💋!

 

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What drives me bananas is "Him and I did that." or "Me and him went there together."  :wacko:  My mom was a high school English teacher.  So obviously I never escaped the clutches of the grammar police.  

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13 hours ago, RedMidge said:

I shudder when I hear:

"We should have went".:angry:

 

I worked for a school principal who always said, "I had went..."  

It was like fingernails on a chalk board to me.  Why had no-one said anything to her?  She's somewhere in upper management in the school system now.  She was a good principal, but that's what I remember most.

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10 hours ago, BethAnnBitt said:

What drives me bananas is "Him and I did that." or "Me and him went there together."  :wacko:  My mom was a high school English teacher.  So obviously I never escaped the clutches of the grammar police.  


I hear this on television all the time.  Unbelievable.  I hear it in news reports, from people who are supposed to be trained in using the language, for Pete's sake!  What's worse is when they think they will be correct and throw the nominative behind a preposition: They gave it to him and I.  I am so thankful for my 11th grade English teacher who explained all this to us.  I knew which was right and which was wrong, but Mr. Starnes explained about nominative objective cases.

Another problem are the books that they choose for kids to read in school.  They choose books that are written from a kid's point of view, so it's written in slang and street talk.  I remember when they chose Bud, Not Buddy.  The grammar was atrocious.  It would have been all right if the dialogue was written that way with the narrative in good English, but the whole thing was a mess.  I know that the teachers didn't use it for grammar lessons or even address it.  

 

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"had went" and "had drank" are popular among my English teacher friends.  American vernacular, I guess.  Still wrong, though.

 

My English teaching days are long behind me, and I can't be bothered correcting people who are both a.) my actual friends and b.) actual English teachers.  I don't know why but I just can't pull that trigger.  Probably I should.  Maybe I don't because I'm jealous how much more money they make at it than I ever did!  If you hire this yokel my very good friend for that kind of money, you deserve what you get! :lol: yes, I'm petty sometimes :ph34r: (but mainly I don't do it because I'm not about correcting friends' grammar while socializing)

 

The one that's like nails on chalkboard for me is "literally".  Yes, we're all getting a bit more practiced at it than we used to be, but hearing it still makes me question the intelligence of the person saying it.  I get it, social media-saturated young people say it without really thinking about it, but when a Proper Grownup says the "line was literally a mile long," I want to strangle them with the nearest hipster scarf! (not literally)

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On 8/18/2020, 6:08:30, Acton said:

I thought we could discuss something else other than the VIRUS!!

 

I have always thought that we are battling against the pop/rock culture when it comes to teaching our students the proper use of English.

 

"She doesn't love me any more" is never heard in modern music as it just isn't cool or sexy or whatever. My students are bombarded with "She don't love me no more' and it's quite difficult to wean them away from this as it's harder for people to UNlearn things later.

 

Also, thanks a lot Louis Armstromg for the lines " I see friends shaking hands, saying 'How do you do...' when I tell people all the time that 'How do you do' is said only once in your life to a person you have never met before.

 

Advertising also doesn't help. McDonald's jingle "We're loving it!!" sends shivers down my spine. Trying to teach people that some verbs are stative and some action is blown away after years of patience. "But I heard this on the radio!!!! they protest.

 

Any other examples from my teaching colleagues? Or anyone else?

Just had a brilliant idea! Why not teach your students the term „ artistic freedom „ ? Poetic licence.  
Discuss?🙏🏻

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Ok I`m not an English teacher and I stumbled on this thread but there is a couple of things that really bug me....

1.How long has couldWould etc of instead of could/would have existed ?

2.Why are suddenly prospective and perspective interchangeable ?

 

Have these always  been correct or are they new or are they still incorrect but people use them anyway.These 2 things really grate on me when I hear them.Not sure if I`m old and out of touch.

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if that's referring to my comment, the "of" in "could/should/would of" was the joke.  It's a mistake people make and isn't correct now nor has it ever been.

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It’s because we abbreviate those words when talking - eg, could’ve. Hardly anyone says “ could have “ when speaking. So we have a schwa sound ( unstressed vowel.) Lazy (?) people just then write “ should of “. 

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Exactly @john g..  I just listened to Hillary Clinton in her speech from last night clearly use it with the perfect schwa ending.  "Well, this can't be another woulda coulda shoulda election".  🙏

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On 8/19/2020, 10:21:21, dessa_dangerous said:

I want to strangle them with the nearest hipster scarf! (not literally)

 

Oh, I bet you literally want to, but not that you actually would.  At least, I would actually want to.

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12 hours ago, Keleth said:

Ok I`m not an English teacher and I stumbled on this thread but there is a couple of things that really bug me...

1.How long has couldWould etc of instead of could/would have existed ?

2.Why are suddenly prospective and perspective interchangeable ?

 

Have these always  been correct or are they new or are they still incorrect but people use them anyway.These 2 things really grate on me when I hear them.Not sure if I`m old and out of touch.

2. Methinks that is interchangeable amongst German speakers practising their “ false friends” in English!🙏🏻

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13 hours ago, dessa_dangerous said:

if that's referring to my comment, the "of" in "could/should/would of" was the joke.  It's a mistake people make and isn't correct now nor has it ever been.

Nope didn`t even notice that but do notice many English speakers (those who`s mother tongue it is) consistently use it in speech and in writing and it really bugs me.

 

11 hours ago, john g. said:

Methinks that is interchangeable amongst German speakers practising their “ false friends” in English!🙏🏻

Don`t understand this.

I`m talking about English people and Americans mainly those who`s mother tongue it is.

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