The English Teacher's Corner

246 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, food mom said:

Ah, the changing language that is English.

 

I was reading a description of a lasagne dish: 

 

" ... I made it for a Sunday dinner, with friends coming over. And then I had leftovers. Then I chopped it up and soupified it."

 

 

 

So often changed by misuse!.

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 Does the writer with the interesting taste in verbs go on to say what Monday's lasagne soup was like?

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16 minutes ago, kiplette said:

 Does the writer with the interesting taste in verbs go on to say what Monday's lasagne soup was like?

I'mma guess "Lasag-ney"

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A question was asked in class the other night, which boils down to:  with all the changes going on in the world, including gender change, how is the English language dealing with teaching pronouns? And how from an ESL viewpoint?

 

Example:  a person does not identify with a binary gender (male/female). The person does not care for "it" (being a person), up until now the only other choice). The person prefers "they".

But "they" is a plural. And this is only one singular person. "They do"? Hmmmmm....

 

Any thoughts? Because this is the future (no pun intended).

 

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This sort of reminds me of about 12-13 years ago when an English insurance rep came to visit us in Hamburg. Nice, pleasant young man. He wanted to mention his partner (can´t remember why ) but kept saying " my better half " instead of he/she etc. Even in one sentence he mentioned " my better half " about three times and seemed very cautious ( he was talking to me and Nicole..about 25 years older than him ).

 

At some stage, I asked him: " what´s your partner´s name? "

He took a deep, stressed breath:

" Tim."

Both of us: " so what´s the problem?. We are children of the revolution and we all laughed. " He visited a couple of more times later in the year on business and brought Tim along.

All was well and he definitely was more relaxed.

 

 

 

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I had a similar problem but some found it more flummoxing

 

my ex and I were never married and it was misleading to call him my "husband".  But effectively he was as close to a husband as one could get without the papers, so he was much more than a "boyfriend".  I started referring to him as my "partner" then everyone thought I was a lesbian (no worry for me, but they were always very surprised when they met him) so I finally started just calling him my man.  

 

that backfired too on occasion - one woman looked at me all googly and said "what does that MEAN? is he your butler or something?"

 

sigh.  sometimes you just can't win. 

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You´re right, dear lisa! You can´t win!

Here in our Cretan village, when we first arrived 5 or 6 years ago, our Greek neighbour (already in her late 70´s ) invited us for a coffee and something to eat. Her son turned up , saw us and said in Greek to his mother: " are they married? "

 

This was BEFORE he said good evening!!

:P

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I am american and I've never heard anyone say that unless they were specifically talking about a party/event situation, and never in a general sense.  Someone might ask "so who's your plus one for the christmas party?" or something like that, but never heard it used to refer to one's partner generally.

 

did you seriously hear people frequently say "my plus one and I..."?

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I am still trying to recover from that ridiculous term " significant other. "

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@john g.:  yes that's still used ("significant other"), though oddly enough it's slipping into vocabulary for the "older" people.

yes, Lisa, I did hear "+1" often when I was in the States Aug/Sept.

American "English" is changing at lightspeed, and the effects are being felt around the globe, especially in business.

And definitely in child-rearing.

 

 

 

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..which reminds me.. I wonder if doctors in the UK still ask a patient: " how are we today? "

Greeks ask that! I had that today from a Greek neighbour.. " ti kavoume ? " ( how are we? ). Meant kindly and was asking only me.

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1 minute ago, food mom said:

@john g.:  yes that's still used ("significant other"), though oddly enough it's slipping into vocabulary for the "older" people.

yes, Lisa, I did hear "+1" often when I was in the States Aug/Sept.

American "English" is changing at lightspeed, and the effects are being felt around the globe, especially in business.

And definitely in child-rearing.

 

 

 

Ha, food mom! I ended up getting up off the beach in Rio in the 70s, no qualifications and a bum ( but a friendly one! ) and teaching English  1-1 a Brazilian Big Boss (Petrobras, oil company ) at his privileged apartment at Copacabana. He was about 50. There was only one book available back then and it was American.

He wanted me to teach him American with an American accent!! I had been in the States as a hitchhiker a couple of years before..so I gave it my best shot.

Important to know: native speakers were rare back then..so I took advantage of it. I learnt a lot from that. And all pre-Internet etc.

:D:D

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10 minutes ago, food mom said:

@john g.:  yes that's still used ("significant other"), though oddly enough it's slipping into vocabulary for the "older" people.

yes, Lisa, I did hear "+1" often when I was in the States Aug/Sept.

American "English" is changing at lightspeed, and the effects are being felt around the globe, especially in business.

And definitely in child-rearing.

 

 

 

Child -rearing? Perchance " they-rearing? " or something equally daft?

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