The English Teacher's Corner

244 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, john g. said:

And prorogation on the other side of the pond, Tor!

?

 

that was a new one for me. :}

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It depends where the hair is.  Just a joke!

I would say 'short brown curly hair'. There's really no rule about this, it's just a question of common usage.

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22 minutes ago, Acton said:

 

I would say 'short brown curly hair'. There's really no rule about this, it's just a question of common usage.

3 hours ago, john g. said:

 

 

yes, there is. I would mark that answer wrong on a test :}

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Short and curlies is the vernacular.

 

To have complete control or dominance over someone; to have someone at one's mercy. "The short and curlies" refers to the hairs on one's neck, despite popular misconceptions. With all that evidence against you, I'd say the police have you by the short and curlies.

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Is it wrong or does it just present a troubling visual? :lol:

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And here was me thinking all these years that the "short and curlies" were in another, more sensitive area of the body... :lol:

 

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8 hours ago, tor said:

'I'm loving it' is also now in the vernacular and also wrong.  

 

Agreed, and it prompts a question:  How long before a misuse of language becomes correct usage?  This is more pertinent to English than some languages because English does not have a body which prescribes the correct form.  My favourite example is the word "methodology" which used to mean the science or study of method.  Through forty years or more of misuse it came to have two additional meanings 1) A way of doing things ("a method") ;  2) A collection of methods. 

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1 hour ago, AlexTr said:

Is it wrong or does it just present a troubling visual? :lol:

 

wrongest :}

 

another example is the Indian word 'prepone'. it has slowly begun to filter into everyday speech.

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24 minutes ago, tor said:

'prepone'

:(

 

Tor, you need to grab yourself a copy of Dreyer's English and have a good four hour read. You will actually love it.

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35 minutes ago, tor said:

What does he say about 'prepone'?

 

Well, considering I have never heard it or seen it used, I am kind of curious about context. Google will declare you wrong for being peevish about it.

 

However, the illustrious Mr. Dreyer does not address it. Regardless, he and I are both enemies of arcane words in modern usage. (Yes, I self-edited after I noticed my repetition.)

 

prepone.GIF

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1 hour ago, tor said:

another example is the Indian word 'prepone'. it has slowly begun to filter into everyday speech.

 

 

I have also not heard this, and I ain't not no master of English language and stuff like, but evens I say:

 

What a horrible word!

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"Should of" instead of "should have"

It's often written by native speakers, but it's just wrong, know your language people! 

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On 9/25/2019, 4:01:02, hooperski said:

Short and curlies is the vernacular.

 

To have complete control or dominance over someone; to have someone at one's mercy. "The short and curlies" refers to the hairs on one's neck, despite popular misconceptions. With all that evidence against you, I'd say the police have you by the short and curlies.

When I as at school, the teacher would grab you by the short and curlies which was about around your temple, and twist it as they lifted you from your chair.

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@brabourn must have gone to the same school as me. Nearly all the teachers were sadistic children hating bastards! The head English teacher was one of the worst.

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Ah, the changing language that is English.

 

I was reading a description of a lasagne dish: 

 

" ... I made it for a Sunday dinner, with friends coming over. And then I had leftovers. Then I chopped it up and soupified it."

 

 

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