I want to hire my father (from non-EU country) to build me a house. Is this possible?

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So my father, from Eastern-European non-EU country is willing to build a house for my family here in Germany. He would spend at least three seasons a year for a few years until it's finished, while I would manage the process (legal, architecture, materials, etc). Also, I would hire and pay him a normal Germany salary for this job, which I think could ease things on the legal side. This process would occasionally require more hands, so I would hire people here, but want my dad to rule the process as I trust him more than anyone when it comes to construction stuff. 

 

At the moment it's all just a nice idea we have, but I want to elaborate it more and find out how possible it is.

 

I would be happy to receive any ideas on this.

Even pointing me to where I can get more information is valuable.

 

Thank you.

 

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Out of curiosity, can your father speak German, communicate with German construction workers, and understand German building codes and materials and standards and so on and so forth?

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Probably not, but you can trust the folks here in Germany to do a wonderful job. ^_^

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Out of curiosity, can your father speak German, communicate with German construction workers, and understand German building codes and materials and standards and so on and so forth?

German construction workers???

 

Where be they?

 

I only know Turkish, Ukrainian, sometimes Polish.  Germans are hard to find (and expensive)

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He would spend at least three seasons a year for a few years until it's finished

Does that make sense? Shouldn't the house be finished within a year?

 

Taking several years to make it is usually due to problems in coordinating the different professionals, not because of building time.

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Does he have qualifications that would be recognised in Germany?Paying him a wage you would have to register and pay tax. etc.

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Hi,

 

This process would occasionally require more hands, so I would hire people here, but want my dad to rule the process as I trust him more than anyone when it comes to construction stuff. 

 

It won't work that way. E.G. if you need an electrician you cannot just hire some electrician, you have to give that job to a company that is registered to do works in that field. The same applies for plumping, the heating and the roof. The local gas supplier, electricity provider, water supplier and wastewater company will not give you the permission to attach that house to their facilities if you cannot prove that these jobs have been done by companies with permission to work in that specific field.

 

Another question is the time span you're planning: If your father would be the only bricky doing the job, that would sound rather cheap, but think about the costs of renting the scaffolding for such a time span...   

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You can do plumbing and electricity by yourself. As any other job around (private) house building. No permission etc needed.

 

However, electricity and plumbing/water/waste water are interacting with suppliers outside your ground and these suppliers will demand a proof that you did the job in accordance with their requirements and rules. Which only a professional who registered can give.

 

So what people often do is e.g. doing the most /simple) parts of the job themselves and the professional does the rest and checks if all you did is OK. Needless to say that one would contact these professionals before starting to work.

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You can do plumbing and electricity by yourself. As any other job around (private) house building. No permission etc needed.

 

 

This is true as long as the OP does those jobs by himself on his house. However, this is not the situation here. He wants to *hire* a relative to do so, And that is not considered "doing it yourself".

 

Example: A learned butcher may change the brakepads on his own car by himself, that's legal. But a roofer may not hire said butcher to do the brakes on the roofer's car.  

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If your father helps you to build your house you don't hire him.

 

So what's all the fuss? If the OP's father would get a tourist visa he could come and work on the house of his son. For free. Who in his right mind would make the father become an employee ?

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Thanks for all the replies.

 

Does that make sense? Shouldn't the house be finished within a year?

 

Taking several years to make it is usually due to problems in coordinating the different professionals, not because of building time.

It's pretty common to build the frame first and leave it over the winter to finish the rest the next year, especially when you build it yourself and don't have much support.

 

If your father helps you to build your house you don't hire him.

 

So what's all the fuss? If the OP's father would get a tourist visa he could come and work on the house of his son. For free. Who in his right mind would make the father become an employee ?

Of course my father would help me for free. I thought it may ease the work permit situation if he is paid and I don't see nothing wrong paying my dad.

 

 

FYI, this whole thing is not about the price or that I don't trust German construction workers. It's about the fact the house would be built by my dad and me together. As a software engineer I can easily transition to freelance consulting and reduce working day to 6 hours to spend another 4-6 on construction.

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I'd be interested to see if non-regulated self-builds would get insurance cover in Germany or if they did if it would be at an increased premium or if the insurers would cite that as a reason not to pay out in case of a claim being made 10 years down the line. Just thinking long term here.

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Surely people have built their own houses, and continue to do so, in countries all over the world. Isn't this what surveyors are for - to verify that buildings are safe? From reading through this thread, if I were the OP, I would take the following steps:

 - Contact local council. Tell them the plan and ask what steps need to be taken to make the build legal.

 - Contact a German surveyor. Tell them the plan and ask what steps need to be taken through the build to pass local regulations.

 - Contact local electricity supplier. Tell them the plan and ask what steps need to be taken to get wired to the mains at the end of this.

 - repeat for water, gas, waste... whatever else is required (probably information the council or surveyor is going to give).

 - Invite my Dad to stay and "help" with the work, and make sure that I am the person who deals with, and makes contracts with, any local workers and professionals who're required to finish the job. My Dad would, of course, instruct me all the way through.

 

I think that trying to employ your Dad overcomplicates things dramatically. You really want to deal with health-care, insurance etc.?

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Health insurance is also a thing to consider: Let's assume the relative is here on visitor's visa, and has a health insurance that covers travels abroad, Falling off of a scaffolding and ending in hospital with a fractured pelvis is certainly not covered by that insurance.  

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I'd be interested to see if non-regulated self-builds would get insurance cover in Germany or if they did if it would be at an increased premium or if the insurers would cite that as a reason not to pay out in case of a claim being made 10 years down the line. Just thinking long term here.

Optimista, we bought our house from a gentleman that self-built - a 350sqm concrete block.  You just need to get everything approved by a qualified electrician / plumber / etc after it is put in, and fix any issues they find.  The bank seems to have no issues providing me insurance.

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also if you are building you will also need a Bauherren versicherung covering anybody getting injured while building on your property

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Building a house with friends and relatives over 3 years isn't paying out if you currently are renter. The sum you save in wages for builders might look huge in the moment, but once you subtract 2 years of extra rent from this sum it all boils down pretty low.

 

Different story would be if you have a house and want to add some rooms or renovate.

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Thanks again to everyone answering here.

 

I've got a really interesting advise from my co-worker to look at auctions for old/neglected houses in a countryside (it would require going to each and check walls for fungus and stuff, of course, which could take months or even years), then buy and renovate one. 

 

In this case I would only need to check, fix and get re-approved electricity, water and other supplies. Also, loan for renovating may be easier to get than for building.

 

Sounds to me like the most real scenario. Also, it's cheaper.

 

 

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