Induction Cooktop - model recommendations

45 posts in this topic

We replaced our hob / oven in October last year & considered moving to an induction hob

but we then found that we would have to replace ALL of our pots & pans (except one)

and so decided to remain "conventional".

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30 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

Do the math :P  I changed house 5 years ago.

 

OK. You took over the Bosch 5 yrs. ago when it was 4 yrs. old.

 

What about the Ikea one that is 2 yrs. old?

 

I'm easily confused. You know that.:)

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I bought the Ikea in 2013, changed house in 2017. I left the Ikea there, no issues. Then I took over the Bosch, which was already 4 years old. No issues so far.

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2 hours ago, keith2011 said:

Anyone know if an altbau apartment with a 25 A cooker connection would be sufficient for a modern induction oven or do they require more?

 

I went and looked at the first one I could find on Saturn and it is rated at 7.4 kW.

7.4kW @230V ~= 32.2 A so probably not.

 
With something bit like a cooker I would always advise getting an electrician in anyway, so perhaps ask them?
 
 
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8 minutes ago, Krieg said:

Single phase or three phase?

Yeah I guess split across 3 phases it might be OK, but with 3 phase it's doubly important to get an electrician in.

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I thought that's the reason why in Germany you are not allowed to wire a stove or an oven yourself.

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2 hours ago, Krieg said:

I thought that's the reason why in Germany you are not allowed to wire a stove or an oven yourself.

Could easily be, although I thought it was an insurance liability thing.

In reality who cares why, if you don't know what you are doing fucking with 3-phase is going to kill you, and if you are giving advice on the internet the safest advice is "ask a professional"

 

When we got our last new cooker, it would never have occurred to me to wire it in myself despite having once been qualified to do so in the UK, I haven't kept up with domestic wiring regs there for 30 years let alone read up on the German rules, but I can do the basic maths regarding W=V*A and answer the simple version of the original question. 

 

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Working in kitchen electrical installations is not all about knowing where to connect the wires. It's also about liquid isolation from the installation.

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1 hour ago, MikeMelga said:

Working in kitchen electrical installations is not all about knowing where to connect the wires. It's also about liquid isolation from the installation.

 

It's about more than that these days, you also have to consider all the other aspects of your local building regulations like for example in the UK there are rules about distances between water and electrical stuff so your taps have to be a certain distance from your sockets, there are environmental rules governing what cables you can use, there are rules about what size cables must be used, are they braded or solid, how are they routed in the wall, etc etc etc.

It's a complex job with legal and safety implications for the both the person doing the work and anyone using the kitchen after the work is done.

 

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We had the wiring in the kitchen completely redone and installed a new induction hob in 2016 and 

are quite satisfied. Most of our pots were induction compatible anyway, and we took the opportunity 

to buy a few new ones.  The hob reacts spontaneously, very similar to gas. If it thinks the pot has 

boiled dry, it automatically shuts down. This has happened twice so far, due to our own negligence, 

but no melted pots or fire or smoke in the kitchen. The "boost" function is very quick to bring a pot 

of water to a boil. The only disadvantage is that the touch keys are under the glass at the front part  

of the unit and are sometimes insensitve to wet or cold fingers. We have a Miele, but I would hesitate 

to recommend any particular make or model. 

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To return to the original post:
Five years ago I moved into my apartment, and needed some kind of electric cooktop. I'd been cooking with gas for years, so did the research.
*What do you want to do? Meaning, how do you normally use your cooktop? Big family? Small? Cook every night? Throw parties often?

*How long do you want it to last (other than forever)? Not a silly question, really. I bought an stove for my mother last year (US), and the dilemma there was that she was 91 and didn't need anything to last for 20 years (for her, at least).

*What features are necessary/can't live without? Timer, steamer, etc. Separate the wishes from the must-haves.

*How much do you want to spend? Remember that most AEG/Bosch/Siemens have the same "guts", just different casings/knobs/etc.

 

At home, I bought a Miele induction, and never looked back. It is the simplest version, because I usually cook for only me. I do not need a kettle for tea, with the turbo boost I can boil water in under 2 minutes. The surface is scratch-resistent and extremely easy to clean. It does take some getting used to (yes, I've boiled pots dry if I don't pay attention), but after adjusting (as with anything new), you'll wonder why you've not switched before.

In the VHS kitchen, I work with 4 Siemens cooktops and 4 Siemens ovens. They all perform differently (and are all 2016 models). They're nothing fancy, but I wouldn't personally buy any of them for at home, but then, I'm picky. They heat unevenly (tops and ovens both), one cooktop in particular takes an extremely long time to heat up. Though they all do have child-protection modes, if that's an issue.

My dream "classroom" kitchen (Berufsschule) was fully Miele. Yes, Miele is pricey. Yes, it lasts for 20+ years (I moved our Miele 1990 kitchen 3 times, from Baden-Württenburg to Bayern, here twice) and when I left it in 2017 we had only replaced the fridge). Miele is made in Germany, which is a tremendous plus. BUT, due to current supply chain problems, their range of models from which to choose has shrunk drastically, and gotten costlier.

 

I'd suggest going to all the manufacturers' websites, and make a chart as to models/features/costs. In 2017 my basic Miele induction cooktop wasn't much more expensive than a Siemens or Bosch. Then watch the sales (yes, there actually are some out there). You can occasionally still get some nice deals.

 

Hope this helps. -b

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On 8/12/2022, 5:32:23, food mom said:

They all perform differently (and are all 2016 models). They're nothing fancy, but I wouldn't personally buy any of them for at home, but then, I'm picky. They heat unevenly (tops and ovens both), one cooktop in particular takes an extremely long time to heat up. Though they all do have child-protection modes, if that's an issue.

 

 

This is a feature, or at least they tried to offer this as a feature, not sure if it is really good or not.

 

One of them is very slow compared to the other ones to provide more "granular" control.   The controls are digital so you have to choose from one to ten.  But when you need to cook something at low heat you do not have much control.  For that you use the "slow" one, imagine it only goes from 1 to 5 compared to the other ones, but here you have as well one to ten controls.    Every step in this one will be like half step on the other ones.

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@Krieg: I think you've misunderstood. I did not mean a particular cooking field on the cooktop, but the entire cooktop itself (out of four separate cooktops, one does not function as quickly as the others). This is the station that we use mainly for baking; as the oven is fine, I think it's just a fluke with this particlar machine.

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Reviving this thread because it is nearest to my issue.

 

We have to buy a new cooktop. The electrics that go to the power buttons have begun not to work. This is a done deal.

 

What I have installed is an power-integrated cooktop and oven (Constructa ca. 20 yrs old). There are 3 breakers (newly installed breaker box and breakers in 2017). The first of the three breakers shuts off just the cooktop, but leaves the oven running. 

 

Why do I think there might be a problem?

 

The electrical wire from the power source runs about 14m around the kitchen so that our cooktop and oven could be placed where I wanted them. I do not have a great deal of confidence in the installer. I am considering buying only a new cooktop (induction, natch), and the electrician said it would be between 120€ and 170€ for the install. This would bring the total price of the new cooktop to 570€ to 740€ depending on which cooktop I choose. The oven works fine and maintains temperature. HOWEVER, the new cooktop would be power-independent of my oven. An entirely new oven/cooktop combo would cost 1200€ installed.

 

The electrician's price is based on using the current power source. Is there any reason to think I will have to have new electrics run around the kitchen to power the power-independent cooktop? 

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Didn't get you. Do you now have 2 independent 3 phase cables going to the kitchen? Or is it one single cable, which is then split between both appliances through a circuit breaker in the kitchen?

If it's the second, then yes, there could be a problem, as the cable might not be thick enough for both appliances. He might refuse to do it unless the cable is replaced.

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3 hours ago, AlexTr said:

We have to buy a new cooktop

Me too.  But in the mean time, I have realised that my oven (have a gas herd) has a normal plug, that is then attatched to an exension cable, and then plugged into another extension cable (shared with dishwasher) before finally connecting with a wall plug.  We have modern wiring, and lots of things (well actually only lighting) have tripped the system.   Is this dangerous?   

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1 hour ago, snowingagain said:

Me too.  But in the mean time, I have realised that my oven (have a gas herd) has a normal plug, that is then attatched to an exension cable, and then plugged into another extension cable (shared with dishwasher) before finally connecting with a wall plug.  We have modern wiring, and lots of things (well actually only lighting) have tripped the system.   Is this dangerous?   

 

Okay, yikes. Somebody answer Snowing's question first.

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