Forced to take German lessons for Arbeitlosengeld

82 posts in this topic

I am an EU citizen and have been on Arbeitlosengeld for only 7 weeks. Today I had a meeting at the Arbeit for Agentur and was told I must decide in that moment with no advice or unable to speak with my German partner that if I want to continue Arbeitlosengeld I must take a German course that starts tomorrow or leave the country if I leave the country they will pay for 3 more months in another EU country. If I want to remain in the country to look for work but not take the German course then I cannot collect arbeitlosengeld any further. Is this legal??? I dont mind learning German but with not being told anything before my meeting and told I must decide that second and that those are my choices I feel what they did can not legally be right. I tried to argue with them as I speak basic German but the the gentleman said he is the Chef, he decides. I am a Chef/Cook and worked for the last 2 years in Germany. Again, learning German is not the problem, the guy said the course starts tomorrow and if I dont take it they cancel my assistance. Anyone know what I can do? If I spoke German then I can sit on my **** and collect. It is so frustrating. Thanks for any help!

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Learning german would be an added qualification. Together with your cooking experience, you would stand a better chance in finding a job 'in germany' so why the resistance.

 

I understand, maybe you had some other plans, but maybe your german partner was not able to convey the same to the bureaucrats. Many courses start on a fixed date and probably the next cousrse is 3-6 months away and so the bureaucrat felt that you would be sitting idle for this period and so you better be productive.

 

As Gwaptiva said - enjoy your course.

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...not being told anything before my meeting and told I must decide that second... if I dont take it they cancel my assistance.

 

Sounds like you are already well on the way to being germanicised if you need to know in advance of the meeting what they are going to tell you in the meeting... ;)

 

It probably is legal - I do not pretend to know for sure however. Clearly they do not want a bunch of unemployable foreigners surfing on the system.

I can understand you not appreciating the charmless, patronising strong-arm tactics so typical of his breed but look on the bright side and improve your German. Win-win situation for all concerned. Hope the lessons are nice and free. Whether or not it is legal is kinda irrelevant, surely. You are not in a position to bargain if you are on state hand-outs.

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"I am an EU citizen ..." Canadians are really EU citizens? How about Americans - can I get in on this? I'd like to get a free German class!!!

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Christy - you have been collecting unemployment benefit for the past seven weeks, and not managed to find work on your own.

 

I find it perfectly acceptable that the AfA has told you what options are available - learn the language, continue to collect benefits and look for work, or look for work on your own, without benefits and a (free) German course. Or,of course, pack your bags!

 

To me it seems like you have had enough time to find work independently, and you have not succeeded, so take the course, learn/improve your German and you should stand a better chance of finding work.

 

Simple really!

 

Not sure if this will help, but there certainly seems to be work for cooks available out there:

 

http://www.kalaydo.de/jobboerse/1/2/3/k/koch/o/frankfurt-am-main/

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For what it's worth I can sympathise with the OP. 7 weeks is not that long in the job finding world. A lot of places take 4-6 weeks just to get back to you. If the OP is spending all day researching and writing applications and then is suddenly being told that as of tomorrow you'll be spending all your time at a German course instead it could be a bit of a shock. It took me 3-4 months of solid work and then I got 3-4 job offers at once. It takes a bit of time, 7 weeks is not that long, 6 months sure.

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if I want to continue Arbeitlosengeld I must take a German course that starts tomorrow or leave the country if I leave the country they will pay for 3 more months in another EU country. If I want to remain in the country to look for work but not take the German course then I cannot collect arbeitlosengeld any further. Is this legal??? I dont mind learning German but with not being told anything before my meeting and told I must decide that second and that those are my choices I feel what they did can not legally be right.

 

Yes, it's legal. German authorities are not obliged to inform you about German law, this is your duty to know that everyone receiving social benefits can be sent to any course Arbeitsagentur wishes them to send.

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Germans in this position are sent on English courses, foreigners are sent on German courses.

 

Germans can be sent to German courses, too. For example, those who have functional illiteracy.

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If learning German " is not a problem", as you said, what has been happening in the 2 years you said you have been working in Germany?

I guess you have dual citizenship? Please, take advantage of the course- it will really benefit you.

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You're unemployed, what's stopping you going to the course, what else were you planning to do?

She said it already:

 

 

If I spoke German then I can sit on my **** and collect.

So OK, you're frustrated, because you can't sit on your whatsit and collect. Tough. Well, allow me to courteously present you a new course of action then, since it appears they DO actually want you to do something instead of sitting on your fanny. To wit:

 

1) STFU

2) Get off your fucking arse & on the fucking course

3) STFU

4a) Stop whining

4b) See #1

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Hi Maurizio,

 

it is quite obvious that you've already been there (that German course), because

 

1) you

2) created

3) a

4) list

5) of

5b) things

6) to

6a) f@cking

7) consider

8) !

 

Cheers

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being born in Europe and being a naturalized Canadian myself, however we came here 2+ years ago with two small kids, hubby is the one that came thru work and I decided if I was going to live in another foreign country for an extended period of time, I might as well learn the language. Used to be my pet peeve when I was in Canada to meet someone whos been in Canada for 20+ years and they didn't speak English. (few of myportuguese friends' parents barely spoke English). Being able to learn german here has allowed me to be independent and rely on myself rather than waiting on others to take me places and be my translator. If the government is offering you german classes... take it!!! Germany has such a great system. Try and practice german with your partner too.

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I think the OP quite possibly has the wrong end of the stick, rather than having a problem attitude to learning the language.

 

 

If I spoke German then I can sit on my **** and collect.

It's the feeling that she is being singled out that rankles, but what is actually happening is that everyone is sent on (free?) training courses while applying for work.

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If you don't want to take the Arbeitlosgeld, then you don't have to take the course. If you want the Arbeitslosgeld, you take the course.

 

Besides, they don't say you have to learn german, you have to attend a course. If you want to remain unemployable, knock yourself out.

 

The conditions of receiving your Arbeitslosgeld change the longer you remain unemployed. The minimum salary you have to accept drops, for example. Courses, trainings etc are used to make you employable. That is why they call it the Bundesagentur für Arbeit and not Arbeitslosagentur. That is simply their mission.

 

Buy the ticket, take the ride.

 

(I actually asked for a Deutsch course when I was unemployed and they did not have one for me...)

 

Also they did tell you at the last minute that you have to take the course, if you spoke german and read the regulations, you would have learned this. See, German is useful! Then you might have also learned if there were exceptions (which would make you very germanized) and figured out for yourself if you could tell the AA to get stuffed.

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