Germanwings Flight 9525 crashes in French Alps

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Routings due to airspace restrictions, usage of airways, weather conditions (including using favourable winds)...

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If you mean is GPS used - I guess so - doubt if its INS any more.

However its not a free-for all - each IFR flight means a flight plan is filed with the route which comprises a sequence of navigation points. These are flown in sequence unless ATC approves a short-cut.

 

Last time I sat on the flight deck was October last year (an A320).

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It is being announced now that a distress call from the flightdeck was not put out.

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Just stop listening to the media who tumble over themselves to grab a headline without proof of facts.

 

Finding what happened (by the BFU, not at Bild-niveau) will take time (like months) & the results will be published.

 

A former member of our flying club is an accident investigator at the BFU in Braunschweig. Since his focus is aircraft over 2 tons I expects hes one of those on his way there now. I do not envy him.

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Hi,

 

 

It is way off a straight direct track - is that normal?

Look up "Pyrenees", please. What you consider a straight direct track from Barcelona to Düsseldorf heads right into these mountains. That's not how it is done. Additionally, if you have an airport where planes can start/land over the sea, you'll do that, even if it's just for the sake of the villagers living nearby.

 

Cheers

Franklan

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Just a few days ago ice on some sensors caused a Lufthansa A321 from Bilabo to Munich to rapidly descend, which seems to mimic what happened to this flight.

 

http://www.spiegel.de/panorama/lufthansa-airbus-computerpanne-schickte-maschine-in-den-sturzflug-a-1024652.html

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Just a few days ago ice on some sensors caused a Lufthansa A321 from Bilabo to Munich to rapidly descend, which seems to mimic what happened to this flight.

 

http://www.spiegel.de/panorama/lufthansa-airbus-computerpanne-schickte-maschine-in-den-sturzflug-a-1024652.html

 

That incident actually happened back in early November, the article is in this week's Spiegel. Scary stuff for sure.

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Absolutely tragic. I dearly pray that there might just be survivors against all odds. My daughter came home from school telling me that her choir teacher had asked the kids to sing a particular song as he'd heard some sad news. He didn't tell the kids what the news was but here's the song...

 

Tears in heaven

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I hope this tragedy didn't happen due to malfunction of the pitot tubes.

 

An A321 of Lufthansa nearly crashed last fall due to these , a problem with ice. The plane virtually fell out of the sky and the crew only could avoid the crash , 1000 m above ground, by shutting off the flight computer and fly "manual".

 

After that incident, the type pitot tubes (not the first time) had to be replaced on most LH planes.

 

My first thought too.

 

If it is, I hope Airbus gets some real shit. It's been an obvious problem for a while now. And also change the fresh air intake from inside the engines to another exhaust free source.

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If that is true, it is very stupid engineering to have a single point of failure on such an important sensor. Why not combine it with GPS info and ground radar feedback?

If the airspeed sensor and the GPS disagree (and radar, if available), alert the pilot instead of making stupid decisions!

 

Even a modern car does something better than that, using a GPS combined with a odometer and a compass sensor to improve position accuracy!

If one is not available (example: GPS on a tunnel), the odometer + compass compensate until a new absolute position is verified.

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As far as I heard now the pito sensors and their impact on the system computer have been checked on all planes with this system combination. But , as Mapleleafdude already mentioned, there could also have been a problem with air exchange and fumes in the cockpit.

 

But---- that's all pure speculation, there are certainly a dozen other things which could have caused the crash. According to the French air traffic control there has been no mayday-message from the plane. Which means the pilots were either terribly busy or they were simply , technically or physically, unable to send one.

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And also change the fresh air intake from inside the engines to another exhaust free source.

 

Actually it's the gas turbine manufacturers who design the offtake for cabin pressurisation, not Airbus. The bleed is located after the compressor, but before the combustion chamber. This allows warm air to be fed into the cabin instead of the extremely cold atmospheric air outside the aircraft, but also means that there can be no exhaust feeding into the cabin. There can be other "contaminants" such as oil, which may be responsible for some of the smells occasionally reported, but it certainly can't be exhaust.

 

 

If that is true, it is very stupid engineering to have a single point of failure on such an important sensor.

 

I agree - although I think they usually have 3 pitot tube sensors these days. I'm not sure of the details though, since obviously things still go wrong. GPS tracking also came up after the Malaysia Airlines flight was lost in the Indian Ocean, you'd think these days all planes would be tracked via GPS.

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I presume the BEA will investigate, assisted by the airline, Airbus and the German and Spanish authorities.

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They have N24 running here at the Munich airport but no mention of the crash. Can they filter the news to specific clients?

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What is coming out of all this for me is how can a plane drop 25k feet in 5 minutes and the aircrew don't notice. Logistically they have 2 pilots for safety but in reality imho only one person at any given time is flying the plane. In a previous era the now defunct second officer would most likely notice a situation like this and raise the alarm. Also I see that dedicated budget airlines like Easyjet or Ryanair operate a fleet of young aircraft but this one here is a bugdet wing of a main airline. So main airline is using their planes for over 20 years and then passing them on to their budget division.

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