Questions about English grammar

74 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, Malt-Teaser said:

I'd have said laying, just because it sounds right to me so I gooooogled and found this which states 'lie' is an intrinsic verb and not used with an object.

 

That would be my choice too Malty, but shorty's teacher has told her that english people do not have a clue about grammar, and that it should be "the book lying on the bed".

From your link, I get that something reclining is lying, and that something deliberately placed on something is laying, so I take it that I can say "a book is laying on the bed" - or can I?

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1 hour ago, robinson100 said:

From your link, I get that something reclining is lying, and that something deliberately placed on something is laying, so I take it that I can say "a book is laying on the bed" - or can I?

 

Where do you see that, robinson100? Laying describes the act itself, not what the thing is then doing, i.e. lay --> 'I laid the book', but lie --> 'the book was lying'. 

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1 hour ago, robinson100 said:

 

That would be my choice too Malty, but shorty's teacher has told her that english people do not have a clue about grammar, and that it should be "the book lying on the bed".

From your link, I get that something reclining is lying, and that something deliberately placed on something is laying, so I take it that I can say "a book is laying on the bed" - or can I?

Only if referring to a finished (ie past ) situation, Rob, eg: the book lay on the bed for a long while (but no longer)...

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Not exactly a grammar question, but Shorty is now studying to become and English and Maths teacher, and has been told that her use of "it`s raining cats and dogs" is terribly old-fashioned, and she should stop using it.

I`m curious for your thoughts on the subject.

Thanks!

 

Origin here, if you are not familiar with it: https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/raining-cats-and-dogs.html

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9 minutes ago, robinson100 said:

Not exactly a grammar question, but Shorty is now studying to become and English and Maths teacher, and has been told that her use of "it`s raining cats and dogs" is terribly old-fashioned, and she should stop using it.

I`m curious for your thoughts on the subject.

Thanks!

 

Origin here, if you are not familiar with it: https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/raining-cats-and-dogs.html

I have not heard that expression  for years!!  Like many other expressions- they do become out of date.

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Just now, RedMidge said:

I have not heard that expression  for years!!  Like many other expressions- they do become out of date.

 

Really?

Have a guess who Shorty picked it up from?

It worries me a little to think that my English is now old-fashioned - I still feel so young!

 

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It is out of date, but is that really a reason to stop using it?  I dunno.  I find use of old fashioned language charming if it's done in moderation.

 

Alternately she could say "it's pouring"

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Just now, Acton said:

Wow! Finally a question I can answer. Nothing wrong with it. Who said it was old-fashioned? Pray tell me.

 

An American lecturer at the university Shorty goes to.

 

Could it also have something to do with the differences between BE/AE? Any thoughts?

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well ok to be fair, I'm not sure that in the US it was ever en vogue to say "raining cats and dogs" but it's not an unknown phrase, at all.

 

When I imagine someone saying it, it would be Audrey Hepburn or a character in an Alfred Hitchcock film.  That time period, but honestly I have no basis for that, it's just my personal reaction.  

 

But whatever!  Old fashioned or not, if she wants to use it, she should!  

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To be serious for a second, the last time I was in America, I heard "It's shittin down out there".

(Probably not to be used in English exams)-

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1 minute ago, Acton said:

To be serious for a second, the last time I was in America, I heard "It's shittin down out there".

(Probably not to be used in English exams)-

 

- yes, I also find it a while lot nicer than "it´s pissing down out there"...

 

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5 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

well ok to be fair, I'm not sure that in the US it was ever en vogue to say "raining cats and dogs" but it's not an unknown phrase, at all.

 

When I imagine someone saying it, it would be Audrey Hepburn or a character in an Alfred Hitchcock film.  That time period, but honestly I have no basis for that, it's just my personal reaction.  

 

But whatever!  Old fashioned or not, if she wants to use it, she should!  

 

Time for a re-boot Lisa!

Whilst I may not be the youngest, I am certainly way younger than Audrey and Alfred, and I would say "I use the phrase all the time" - well, when it is, if you see what I mean?

 

 

- just for you dear!

 

 

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oh my - talk about "out of date" :)

 

love it - thank you robinson!!!!

 

eta:  holy crap!  trench coats and speedos?  whaaaaahahahahahaha

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