Questions about English grammar

74 posts in this topic

I am wondering if you can make a case for using the the word hypotenuse as a adverb to mean going from A to B and skipping C.

 

If you want to do the job hypotenusly, I suggest...

 

or as an adjective

 

If you want to do the job in a hypotenusical way, then I suggest...

 

I am not interested in other words or phrases that mean cutting corners, in the shortest way, or anything else like that.

 

post-10916-14262485681987.gif

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I've never heard of it being used as an adverb, and I used to be pretty good in math. :)

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I agree with Metall - I don't think it can be anything but a verb.

 

Is there any thing wrong with "directly"?

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Many neologisms simply don't come across well. I can't see that particular verbification catching on, tor. ;)

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I don't expect it to catch on :) just wondering if it is theoretically possible.

 

In the way that you can triangulate a position or do something in a circular manner....

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I don't think it can be anything but a verb.

 

Ah, a noun. ;) ("A hypotenuse", not "to hypotenuse".)

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I don't expect it to catch on just wondering if it is theoretically possible.

 

In the way that you can triangulate a position or do something in a circular manner....

 

Hypotenuse! The hypotenusing hypotenuse hypotenused hypotenusely.

 

But; if you want to use geometry, wouldn't going from A to B be "lining"?

 

(on a more serious note, going from A to B without going through C where A->B is the shortest route, and going through C would just make the journey longer, is the default and thus requires no special name)

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Hypotenate: Verb: To go directly from one point to another without any intervening steps. This can a physical location, intuitive leap, emotional response. Asking your girlfriend to marry you without asking her fathers permission is an example.

 

Hypotenation: Adjective.

 

It is already there.

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https://www.khanacademy.org/math/geometry/right_triangles_topic/special_right_triangles/v/45-45-90-triangle-side-ratios

 

Dear Tor!

I have failed!

I was trying to be clever and find a lovely and perfect answer to your problem. Have failed totally. In fact, I have totally missed the point. I´m cold and it´s raining outside.

 

By the way, FunnyLookingForeigner: just spotted your post. Anything with -ation on the end is a noun! Or, at least , it used to be when I still knew what I was talking about! :D (long time ago!)

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So tor's hypotenusly is in fact hypotenately (adverb was the aim), and hypotenusical is maybe hypotenential? No, that can't be it...but I do like the idea of running hypotenately through the park (hypothetically, you understand, it is dark and rainy out).

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https://www.khanacademy.org/math/geometry/right_triangles_topic/special_right_triangles/v/45-45-90-triangle-side-ratios

 

Dear Tor!

I have failed!

I was trying to be clever and find a lovely and perfect answer to your problem. Have failed totally. In fact, I have totally missed the point. I´m cold and it´s raining outside.

 

By the way, FunnyLookingForeigner: just spotted your post. Anything with -ation on the end is a noun! Or, at least , it used to be when I still knew what I was talking about! (long time ago!)

 

Just remembered some ( noun !) examples: castration ( ouch ), masturbation ( sometimes ouch ), civilisation ( unusual these days..)! Ah, well....probably forgot a few thousand NOUNS :D

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Ok, because I feel like procrastinating instead of doing what I'm supposed to be doing... I just did searches on two large linguistic corpuses (the Corpus of Global Web-Based English and the Google Books corpus). There are no examples of hypotenuse with verbal or adverbial endings (e.g. hypotenused, hypotenusing, hypotenusly...). I did find a few examples of hypotenusal, which apparently has a technical use in land surveying (e.g. "Find the angle of slope and the hypotenusal allowance per chain length"). And a nice example of hypotenuse used as an adjective: Pythagoras described as "that hypotenuse guy" :) But that's all.

 

So basically, it doesn't seem to have occurred to anyone to use it as anything other than a noun.

 

Now I will stop procrastinating.

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Sorry, John G but not all -tion words are nouns or at least they are not always nouns e.g. ration, station.

You're mostly correct though!

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Hold on here. What is all this nonsense about words ending in -tion being nouns.

A noun is a thing. Table, chair. Any physical object.

Spot the nouns.

"This was the position of the big table and the small chair."

Position is not a bloody noun.

It is an adjective. As are "big" and "small".

 

In linguistics, an adjective is a "describing word", the main syntactic role of which is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified. (thank you wiki)

 

I should have said "adverb" rather than adjective, as hypotenation describes the action of moving, (moving being a doing word, i.e. a verb)

 

Still at least I got the chance to see how smart you all think you are.

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I am not interested in other words or phrases that mean cutting corners, in the shortest way, or anything else like that. post-10916-14262485681987.gif

 

You have misunderstood the meaning of the word "hypotenuse". It doesn't mean "direct", "cutting corners", or anything like that. It simply means "lying beneath", as line ED does in that second FED triangle of yours. It's a poorly-chosen term even in the context of geometry since the hypotenuse could end up being on top if you rotate the triangle.

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FunnyLookingForeigner, I do hope you're not working as an English teacher - you seem to be very mixed up about grammar.

 

Your description is totally incorrect.

 

The position is a noun - you can't use it to qualify the other noun in your example, "table" - the position table???

 

You can use the adjectives big or small to qualify the word position - big position...

 

Similarly, you haven't understood that your "hypotenation" word (which I actually initially greened you for as I thought your calling it an adjective was just a quick error) is neither an adverb nor an adjective, but a noun.

 

edit: and sorry to jane58, I redded your post by accident (can somebody green her for me, thanks!) - you are of course correct that ration and station can be used as verbs and not only as nouns.

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