Sufficient salary ranges in Frankfurt & surroundings

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Hello!!

 

I was recently given information about a kindergarten job opening starting with a salary of 26000 euro (before taxes). I have 3 years experience, a teaching credential, a masters degree in education from the U.S.

 

Around how much would I be getting after taxes and if its enough to live off of (rent, transportation, food, utilities, student loan) and be able to save some? Is this salary enough to live of off in Frankfurt?

 

Thanks!

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I was recently given information about a kindergarten job opening starting with a salary of 26000 euro (before taxes). I have 3 years experience, a teaching credential, a masters degree in education from the U.S.

 

I would highly recommend that you do much more research before even considering this option. There is a huge difference between Erzieher and Lehrer in Germany.

 

Read Qualified (teacher) job application proccess and Employer canceling contract during probationary for more info.

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Engelchen thank you for that information. Very useful information as I continue to do my research.

 

I have been looking into international schools. I have started applying already, but unfortunately there seems to be no vacancies or response from many of these schools. Hopefully (fingers-crossed) that I will hear from the schools I have applied to before the new school year starts.

 

My other option was applying to kindergarten schools just to get my foot in the door, but after reading the threads I think I'll wait the international schools.

 

Any advice or suggestions?

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If you are single with no single your take-home pay will be about €18,382. I come to that number as follows:

 

You pay 14% income tax on anything you earn above 8,354 euros (the first 8,354 euros are tax-free). Then there's solidarity tax, which is 5.5% of your income tax.

 

Income tax (14%): 2,470.44 (the first 8,354 you earn are tax-free)

Solidarity tax (5.5% of income tax): 135.87

Health insurance (7.3%): 1.898.00

Care insurance (1.03%): 266.50

Public pension (9.45%): 2.457.00

Umemployment insurance (1.5%): 390.00

 

You'll have 18,382,20 left is my math is right. That's assuming you don't sign up with the Catholic or Evangelical church: that'd add church tax to your total bill.

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Rent costs you can check out at immonet.de or immobilienscout24.de. Typical rents are 600 - 700 euros/month, but if you are not fussy about where you live you can find cheaper digs.

 

Your travel card for unlimited public transport usage in Frankfurt will set you back 835,00 a year.

Utilities (heating, electricity, water, phone internet) will depend on many factors but definitely over 1,500 euros a year even for the tiniest apartment. I'd budget 1,500 - 2,000 a year.

Basic groceries are cheap in Germany.

Booze is cheap by Western European standards (our saving grace).

 

I am not sure I'm forgetting something, but I wouldn't count on saving any money unless you lead a very spartan life in Frankfurt.

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If you really want to live in Europe and make a wee bit more money than teachers in the U.S. (or Germany) make, see http://www.dodea.edu/Offices/HR/employment/

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It's cheaper if you live in a neighborhood like Niederrad or somewhere even farther out (which is not at all far!) and bike instead of getting a yearly pass. Our expenses are very low, and we aren't particularly thrifty (though we hardly eat out). We have managed to save a fair bit, even for the year that our net income was about 1200/month.

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My other option was applying to kindergarten schools just to get my foot in the door, but after reading the threads I think I'll wait the international schools.

 

Any advice or suggestions?

 

Forget the Kitas! As I already tried to explain in the other thread, there is a huge difference in Germany between Erzieher and Lehrer and being an Erzieherin is not a good way to become a Lehrerin.

 

You might want to look up the posts by Kazalphaville, she has given lots of great advice regarding employment opportunities at international schools.

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Forget the Kitas! As I already tried to explain in the other thread, there is a huge difference in Germany between Erzieher and Lehrer and being an Erzieherin is not a good way to become a Lehrerin.

 

Yes, there sure is a difference. I looked it up after your first post and I am definitely leaning more towards teaching at international school. I looked up Kazalphaville for advice in jobs at international school. Thank you once again! :)

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Another question though...I would need a work permit for Germany. I looked up the information and it says "employment contract or letter of intent from your future employer in Germany and two copies thereof" As a U.S citizen can still apply for it even if I don't have a job offer?

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Topics merged by admin

Hello, all, this is my first post here. 

I got an offer for a PhD position in Giessen. However, since I sort of got sick of living in a small town, I'm considering to actually live in Frankfurt, esp. since I won't have to go to Uni every day, but only a couple of times a week for a couple of hours. 

Now, my stipend will be around 1500 EUR per month (net, I guess). Also, I'll be provided with a Hesse semester ticket, which would enable me to use public transport and regional trains for free (thus, no transport costs). 

I'm interested in your opinion if this amount should suffice to find a decent place to live in Frankfurt? I mean, of course I'd like to live alone in a studio in the city centre, but I'm being realistic, and would be happy with either a WG somewhere close to the Hauptbahnhof (since I'd still need to travel 40 minutes to Giessen, so it'd be nice not to lose too much time in Frankfurt commuting), or a studio somewhere near a U- or S-Bahn station connecting me to Hauptbahnhof fairly quickly. 

I'm generally not too demaniding about the type of apartment, as long as it's remotely decent and functional, size doesn't matter, esp. if I'd live alone. I know Frankfurt is one of the most expensive German cities, but then, my partying expenses are also moderate, so I'm mostly worried about being able to have enough for rent and utilities. 

Thanks in advance for answers! 

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So, you are not in Giessen yet? Maybe you should try and get an offer to do your PhD in Hamburg, Berlin...  Frankfurt is not that big, you know.

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No, I'd move there in October only. Well, now it's more or less done, because it is not that easy to get enrolled into paid PhD positions in the programs that you like and in the cities you like. I'm aware Frankfurt is not the biggest one, but it seems like a big enough at the moment, esp. compared to Giessen. 

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It really depends on your lifestyle and/or social life, but you should be able to make it with 1500 if you live in a WG. May get a bit tight if you decide not to share accommodation - I mean, it's still doable but don't expect to go out much in that case.

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My partner got a PhD position in Giessen as well, and we live in Frankfurt. If you share, it's definitely doable with 1500, unless you like the high life and are spendthrift. Make sure you do live near the main station, or Frankfurt West. If you save time in Frankfurt getting to station, you will have more time to waste getting to the Uni from Giessen station. The buses there are not that useful to go to the campus that is in the south of the city at least. Not sure where your part will be. You could also park a bike at the station and use it, or even get a folding bike (or walk, I guess). But, you WILL want to live in Frankfurt where there is more to do.

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My partner got a PhD position in Giessen as well, and we live in Frankfurt. If you share, it's definitely doable with 1500, unless you like the high life and are spendthrift. Make sure you do live near the main station, or Frankfurt West. If you save time in Frankfurt getting to station, you will have more time to waste getting to the Uni from Giessen station. The buses there are not that useful to go to the campus that is in the south of the city at least. Not sure where your part will be. You could also park a bike at the station and use it, or even get a folding bike (or walk, I guess). But, you WILL want to live in Frankfurt where there is more to do.

​Thank you very much for your answers! Yes, I guess a nicely chosen WG near the main station will do then. My department is in Philosophicum part of Giessen, so it's not that close to their train station either, but I'll see, I'll either park a bike there or walk/rely on buses, since right now I also do a lot of walking to get to work. 

And my lifestyle is def. not "luxurious" in any sphere, so yeah, I'm not looking for such in Frankfurt either. 

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My partner says you ought to register as a PhD student (Promotionsstudent) and pay 200-300 euro per term to get free public transport and discounted meals at the Mensa. Is this what you said you'll already be doing? Or, are they giving you the ticket entirely free? Really, for one person, 1500 is plenty. I also recommend living in Bockenheim near Frankfurt West station instead of near the main station. And, the Philosophikum is very close. No worries there - 10-15 minute walk.

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You're right, I do pay something over 200 Euros per semester for the ticket and discounted meals. It's just that I will have some savings for such purposes (also apartment deposit and such), so I already excluded those costs from the first couple of stipends, haha. :)

Thanks about the Bockenheim tip. The trains to Giessen all stop at F. West? 

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