Obituary thread of notable and obscure folk: Pete Shelley Buzzcocks lead singer

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Theory of probability, the roll of the die..  Great man, sorry to hear he has left us..

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Yeah. And what a horrible way for he and his wife to leave this world.

"A Brilliant Madness is the story of a mathematical genius whose career was cut short by a descent into madness. At the age of 30, John Nash, a stunningly original and famously eccentric MIT mathematician, suddenly began claiming that aliens were communicating with him and that he was a special messenger."

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All those brains, no seat belt.

​That's not a fair comment. He was in the back of a cab. How often do people typically put a seatbelt on in the back of a cab?

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​That's not a fair comment. He was in the back of a cab. How often do people typically put a seatbelt on in the back of a cab?

Obviously the laws of physics also apply in the back of a cab. And unlike "typical people",  he was smart enough to know that.

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This YouTube clip from Eyes on Cinema arrived in my inbox and I found it to be incredibly touching. It's an interview with Christopher Lee on Belgian TV around the time of the Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring film release. In this clip, Lee talks of losing a special insignia from World War II.

Christopher Lee first enlisted in the Royal Air Force in 1940, where he worked as an intelligence officer specializing in decoding German ciphers. He was then posted to North Africa where he was based with the precursor of the SAS, the Long Range Desert Group (LRDG). While leapfrogging from Egypt across Tobruk to Benghazi, Lee moved behind enemy lines from base to base sabotaging Luftwaffe planes and airfields along the way. After the Axis surrender in 1943, Lee was seconded to the Army during an officer swap scheme, where he officiated the Gurkhas of the 8th Indian Infantry Division during The Battle of Monte Cassino. After working with the LRDG, Lee was assigned to the Special Operations Executive, conducting espionage, sabotage and reconnaissance in occupied Europe against the Axis powers. For the final few months of his service, Lee, fluent in several languages including French and German, was tasked with tracking down Nazi war criminals alongside the Central Registry of War Criminals and Security Suspects. Of his time within the organisation, Lee said "We were given dossiers of what they'd done and told to find them, interrogate them as much as we could and hand them over to the appropriate authority." Lee then retired from the RAF in 1946 with the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Although his service records remain classified and Lee himself was reluctant to discuss anything about his service, after his retirement he'd been individually decorated for battlefield bravery by the Czech, Yugoslav, British, and Polish governments. He was also on personal terms with Josip Broz Tito, presumably after their mutual involvement with the Partisan resistance movement (widely cited as the most effective resistance movement in occupied Europe). 

 

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Today the great Thé Lau passed away after a long illness at the age if 62. Most of you won't know who he was, but he and his band The Scene made one of the best albums ever with Blauw , a record that's accompanied me from my student days until now, and which will continue to do so.

 

And listening to the title track on full on my headset right now, and the tears are streaming down my cheeks.

 

Rest softly, Thé

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