Exchanging Indian driving license for German

45 posts in this topic

Thanks PercyB for the detailed answer!

 

 

What is written after the number 14?

If it is 10 then this will refer to the column 10 which will show the validity of the driving categories with dates.

 

In column 14 it says 10, but column 10 contains the date in which the German license was issued.

 

 

If it is not 10 then it will be the date you past your test but only if you took your test in Germany.

 

I didn't take a test in Germany, I converted a license that can be converted as is, no written or theoretical test needed.

 

 

In addition as this is an exchange licence, also on the back at the very bottom there is the number 12. Does this start with the number 70. followed by some numbers and letters which normally refer to your old licence number and your date of birth.

 

If you see 70 this is the administrative number indicating that the licence has been exchanged and sometimes at the end there might be a country code.

 

This exists, and is the reason I am hoping that rental companies will agree to pay any attention to the photocopy, as it it of the license whose number appears in 12.

 

 

Car rental companies will only check the licence is valid and check the categories and dates in column 10.

 

Which is exactly the problem categories and dates in column 10 are from the end 2013, not 2000 when I first got my license, hence the need for a photocopy.

 

I have no idea if the dates in column 10 should have been the original ones from my old non-EU license, but as Luneburg was adamant that they should be 2013, it was a photocopy or no license...

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If you exchanged your non EU licence for an EU licence then there must of been a reciprocal arrangement with your native country, the process should of been more or less like for like, a bit like crossing the T's and dotting the i's.

 

Column 10 normally shows the actual dates (25-12-01) in which those driver categories were passed/issued.

Column 11 for example will show another date for specific categories like C1 whereas at the age of 50 a medical is required and then has to be retaken every 5 years.

Then column 12 will show any restrictions with various codes. For example in Category B it might be 70.GB (not to be confused with row 12 at the bottom as per my previous post) this means that category B is valid until your 70 Birthday and country of issue was Great Britain. Additional codes could be things like 01 Visually aid required or 78 Automatic transmission only.

 

The problem may of been with your old licence, country of issue, translation etc, but it certainly doesn't sound as though your driver entitlements have been entered correctly and it certainly shouldn't be necessary to carry a copy of your old licence.

 

The only other thing that may of effected this is if your old licence did not have the pass dates and driver entitlements but that's highly unlikely.

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In column 14 it says 10, but column 10 contains the date in which the German license was issued.

 

Same here.

 

My wife & I changed from the grey "Lappen" to the EU license in June 2012. In my case the back of

the EU card shows the various categories (B, C1 etc.) with the date 11.11.83

Back in those days we Brits had to exchange our UK licenses for a German on (no tests or anything)

between 6 & 12 months after arriving (I arrived in November 1982). My old grey German

license had a stamp on it saying that it was issued in exchange for a UK license category A & E.

But no UK license date.

 

Anyhow - all trace has been lost of when I was first issued with a drivers license in the UK which

must have been 1970 or 1971.

 

I guess at this stage of life it doesn't matter any more.

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The problem may of been with your old licence, country of issue, translation etc, but it certainly doesn't sound as though your driver entitlements have been entered correctly and it certainly shouldn't be necessary to carry a copy of your old licence.

The old license had the correct dates, and I only have 1 category, they entered the "need glasses" requirement properly, and there was no translation of the license needed. I think this has more to do with

 

 

Please note that the KFZ-Zulassungsstelle in Luneburg have also proven so far to be impressively clueless when dealing with the entire process of switching a foreign license so anything and everything they say should be taken with fairly large grain of salt.

than anything else.

 

I don't need the photocopy to drive, I just may need it if I ever need to prove in the next year or so that I am not a new driver.

 

Note to self - things are easier in a place where there are actually other immigrants. Always try to be the simplest case the Beamter has met recently, not the most complicated!

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I really wonder sometimes where you get your information or do you just dream it up, as for the above that is just total bollocks, a licence exchanged/issued in Germany is valid in every EU country whilst visiting.

 

As soon as you keep your residency in Germany. If you move to other EU country, it can become invalid. Why? There is no EU wide list of countries for which examless exchange is allowed, each country has its own list and these lists are different, that's why.

 

For example, Ukraine and Poland have a reciprocity agreement, but Germany and Ukraine don't. So, you can swap your Ukrainian DL while being a resident of Poland and get a Polish license. You can drive with it within EU. But if you move to Germany, your EU Polish license becomes invalid, you need to take theoretical and practical exams.

 

Source: §28 FeV Absatz 4, Satz 7:

 

 

(4) Die Berechtigung nach Absatz 1 gilt nicht für Inhaber einer EU- oder EWR-Fahrerlaubnis,

7. deren Fahrerlaubnis aufgrund einer Fahrerlaubnis eines Drittstaates, der nicht in der Anlage 11 aufgeführt ist, prüfungsfrei umgetauscht worden ist, oder deren Fahrerlaubnis aufgrund eines gefälschten Führerscheins eines Drittstaates erteilt wurde,

 

Anlage 11 is a list of states with whom Germany has reciprocity agreement. If your previous DL is in this list, your German DL will only remain valid in other EU country if your state is also in a similar list (I should stress once again, I'm talking about moving to other EU country, not visiting it!). India is not in Anlage 11, thus exchanging Indian license will not have such legal consequences.

 

 

What do you mean by a normal German licence, there is only one type and it's now called European driving licence which is exactly the same throughout the EU.

 

The same type, but German one is called Führerschein. Which is against Vienna convention 1968 (signed not only by EU member states) because it should be called Permis de conduire. But due to European linguistic chauvinism Germany, like many other EU countries, violates Annex 6 of this convention.

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As soon as you keep your residency in Germany. If you move to other EU country, it can become invalid. Why? There is no EU wide list of countries for which examless exchange is allowed, each country has its own list and these lists are different, that's why.

 

For example, Ukraine and Poland have a reciprocity agreement, but Germany and Ukraine don't. So, you can swap your Ukrainian DL while being a resident of Poland and get a Polish license. You can drive with it within EU. But if you move to Germany, your EU Polish license becomes invalid, you need to take theoretical and practical exams.

This clearly shows that your head is so far up your own backside you fail to read or understand what others have written.

 

A classic example is the Ukrainian living in Poland, it is exactly the same as the sample story of the Chilean living in spain that I posted in #20.

 

I'm not even going to bother discussing this with you any longer as I might as well go talk to the birds in the trees and is not very constructive to this thread.

 

However, if you do post such rubbish, as with the examples seen in this thread and others, then I will correct you.

 

Offering people advice on something as important as a driving licence needs to be accurate and not just guess work like your first post on this thread, not only was it 100% incorrect it clearly demonstrated you did not have one iota what you were talking about.

 

Have a good day.

 

 

That means that most probably German DL is not valid in India.

 

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A classic example is the Ukrainian living in Poland, it is exactly the same as the sample story of the Chilean living in spain that I posted in #20.

Indeed. I didn't read your post because you started with accusations. So I just went to search for relevant law and posted a reference:

http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/fev_2010/__28.html

 

I don't understand why you accuse me of posting false information because how a link to FeV can be false? In contrast, europa.eu is not a law, it's just an information website of the EU. But I didn't read your post 26 because I don't read posts calling me "idiot" and similar.

 

 

Have a good day.

We don't need these English style pseudo-manners, please. German directness is much better.

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Anyhow - all trace has been lost of when I was first issued with a drivers license in the UK which

must have been 1970 or 1971.

 

Interesting parallel - due to EU regulations we MUST exchange our current glider pilot licenses (marked Unbefristet / Not Limited) for new ones (that look almost identical) at a cost of 50 Euros in S-H (Hamburg only 15 Euros). This must be done by early April this year; the power plane folks had to exchange a year ago.

 

Whilst past new licenses (eg when a new rating was added) always contained the original date of issue (in my case July 1983) the new one which arrived today shows just "12.01.2105". In otherwords I (& all of us) look as if we have zero experience.

 

This license is also "Unbefristet / Not Limited" - not taking bets on how long that will last.

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The interesting thing is that Belgium introduced DL (for cars) in 1967. That means that if you owned a car before 1967, you can still drive without a license in Belgium and this is somehow compliant with EU regulations.

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Dear All

 

I'm from India and will shortly be relocating to Germany. I read that you need to surrender the Indian original driving license to get a German license (apart from tests etc). My question is, when I travel back to India and need to drive in India, will my German license be valid? Or do I need to get an International Driving permit from Germany?

 

Thanks for letting me know

 

Few people already provided the answers for your question, still I am adding the official links from German Consulate, India (Which is added not long before).

 

http://www.india.diplo.de/Vertretung/indien/en/06__Consu__Visa/Consular__Services__India/Driving__License.html

http://www.india.diplo.de/contentblob/3393960/Daten/4411953/Driving_Licence.pdf

 

So here is the summary about your topic:

- You can drive in Germany for first 6 months with your valid Indian DL (if planned for normal resident, Either with IDP (< 1000 INR) or with a translation of DL (50 EUR)).

- After 6 months, you need a German DL, which you can obtain, either by transferring your Indian DL or by getting a fresh German DL.

- In both case, a theory and practical test is mandatory. (This will be different for other countries).

- Cost for transferring DL, between 1000 - 1500 (depends on the lesson drives, fixed cost is ~ 600 EUR for application and fees for one test).

- Cost for German DL from scratch: ~2000 - 2500 EUR (it may worth for long term).

 

Transferring Indian DL:

- You will have only 1 DL (either German or Indian) at a time.

- Either you have to swap to Indian DL each time you travel to India

- or you should get an IDP with German DL (I have the IDP with cost: 14 EUR, valid for 3 years).

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Hi AfroFrau

 

Could you please provide me theory on-line in English for Driving lessons.

 

Thanks,

Raja

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Hi AfroFrau

 

Could you please provide me theory on-line in English for Driving lessons.

 

Hi Akash3apr. Did you not get my reply to your PM:

 

Hi...

I mainly used the online material (www.fahrschulcard.de) provided by my driving school where i practised 900 or so questions. The 30 questions in the theory test are derived from the same 900 and are framed exactly like the study material. I also found the 'German Way & More' Expat blog to be very useful. It actually has a sample theory test paper and links to useful pages such as Aral (Fuehrerschein.aral.de), Verkehrs Verlage Remagen (www.vvr.de) and Brian Purcell. 'Brian's Guide to getting Around Germany' is a fantastic and must read resource for rules, signs and signals.

All the best,

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Dear All,

 

Thank you very much for all the replies, I'm leaving for Germany today, and I think it will be better to spend some more EUROs and get a German DL from scratch. That way there are no hassles

 

Thank you all for the advice

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I think it will be better to spend some more EUROs

 

This could be anywhere between 800-1200€ more than getting it converted.

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This could be anywhere between 800-1200€ more than getting it converted.

 

Only if one is fit to drive in Germany and will pass the test without taking any lessons. Otherwise, only ~200 euro difference (for compulsory theory lessons). The upper limit is ~2500 euro (everything depends on one's talent).

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Only if one is fit to drive in Germany and will pass the test without taking any lessons. Otherwise, only ~200 euro difference (for compulsory theory lessons). The upper limit is ~2500 euro (everything depends on one's talent).

 

I mentioned some average numbers. If he was to do absolutely the bare minimum and take the test with no additional driving lessons, and pass etc. :

(These are all approximate costs from when I got mine last year)

 

Cost of translating foreign language drivers license (mine was in English) at the ADAC : 50€

First aid course and eye exam (I was lucky because it was some anniversary week and hence there were discounts) : 16€

Registration with the driving school for a Umschreiben : 100€

Registration with the Führerscheinstelle : 45€

Cost of theory exam : 90€

Cost of practical driving exam : 250€

Cost of the one driving unit which you pay the driving school for using the car for the exam (depending on the school) : 35€

 

This adds up to 586€. The 800€ was more realistic because driving with the intention of passing the exam is quite different from driving otherwise. For example, if there is a construction area and the speed limit is 30kph, but the lane is well separated say, with a concrete barrier, almost no vehicles are going to slow down to 30kph, but if one expects to pass the test, one might very well have to. So ones normal experienced driving instinct might cause one to fail the test. So it never hurts to take some lessons and this could push the lower limit to maybe 700-800€. Cheers.

 

Edit : Suddenly, I am not so certain about the exact prices of the tests. I think the 250€ is the sum total of what you owe the TÜV as well as what you owe the driving school.

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For example, if there is a construction area and the speed limit is 30kph, but the lane is well separated say, with a concrete barrier, almost no vehicles are going to slow down to 30kph, but if one expects to pass the test, one might very well have to.

What??

Normally in Germany you do slow down to 30 kmh in construction area unless you are an Audi employee on company car.

 

The only unrealistic thing on the test is parking, everything else you should also use in real life unless you are an Audi driver or Italian.

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What??

Normally in Germany you do slow down to 30 kmh in construction area unless you are an Audi employee on company car.

 

The only unrealistic thing on the test is parking, everything else you should also use in real life unless you are an Audi driver or Italian.

 

I meant in a construction area where it is very well separated from the rest of the street with a concrete separator. Where there is practically no chance that construction workers or vehicles or debris could spill on to the street.

But anyway I was talking about this one specific construction zone here in Ingolstadt that has been there for the last 3 years since I moved here and still is. And it was just an example. My point was that driving for the test is definitely a bit different even for someone who has been driving in Germany for many years. :)

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Hi all,

 

Need help from experts.

 

My question is similar to the main question of the thread. I have registered for German driving license (Class B only) in Heilbronn Rathaus today. The person in-charge told me that they will keep my Indian DL with them and won't give back. When I asked whether can I swap my German DL with Indian DL while visiting India, she told it is not possible and I can use German DL in India and if not sure I can get International DL with German DL in Rathaus.

 

Even if German DL or Intl DL is valid in India, my only worry is that I have applied for Class B alone and hence I cannot drive a Motorbike when I visit India. For my friend who applied for German DL in Chemnitz, they didn't get his Indian DL in Rathaus. Simply they got his translated version only.

 

Anybody have any experience with this problem? Pls help

 

Regards,

Gopi

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