Having insurance pay for vitamins

12 posts in this topic

I was wondering if vitamin supplements are covered by health insurance? I have Techniker Krankenkasse insurance.

Thanks

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That depends on a lot of things. If you have a medically diagnosed deficiency and require high doses of certain vitamins on prescription they may be covered. Contact your insurer and ask.

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You know, there is a point at which most people stop posting every.single.question that pops into their head, and try to find answers themselves.

 

TK is well-known for providing good customer service for English-speakers - ring them up and ask. As Westvan says, it depends on a lot of things, so how the h8ll should we know?

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I also have the TK. I don't want to pay a higher premium because the TK pays for that nonsense. In Germany people get enough vitamins.

I am already pissed that they pay for homöopathy.

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Hi,

 

 

I don't want to pay a higher premium because the TK pays for that nonsense. In Germany people get enough vitamins.

Well, there are chronic diseases like Crohn's that may render your body unable to digest some vitamins effectively, especially A D E and K. In that case the Health insurance might pay for supplements.

 

But without more information from the OP, I have to assume that the answer to that question is "No".

 

Cheers

Franklan

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You are not paying a higher premium because of homeopathy, AnswerToLife42! TK charge the same as other Kassen without this extra! Anyway, they only pay up to 100 euros a year for homeopathic drugs ( prescription or non-prescription ). Settle down! :)

Anyway, if it works for some people, what´s not to like?

 

I don´t know 100% either which vitamin stuff is covered by public insurance but I assume - as long as it´s not merely a life-style factor - it´s covered within reason as long as medically justified. Franklan made a very good point and maybe others know more from their own experience.

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Agree with Franklan and John - there are certain medical conditions that require extra supplements or vitamins, and these are usually covered by your health plan/kasse. So best bet is to check with them, or ask your pharmacist.These would require a doctor's prescription. Beware of some online vitamins- check where these are produced. Also, beware that many vitamins and supplements may have interactions with prescribed medications.

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I also have the TK. I don't want to pay a higher premium because the TK pays for that nonsense. In Germany people get enough vitamins.

I am already pissed that they pay for homöopathy.

 

- you do realise that you are permitted to change to another KK that might be better suited to your needs, don't you?

 

If you are so pissed off about homeopathy, change to a KK that doesn't cover it!

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Just sharing the reply I got from TK:

 

Vitamine sind Produkte, die grundsätzlich zur Gruppe der Lebensmittel gehören. Lebensmittel, Nahrungsergänzungsmittel, sogenannte Krankenkost und diätetische Lebensmittel – einschließlich der Produkte für Säuglinge oder Kleinkinder – sind durch die Arzneimittelrichtlinie von der Leistungspflicht ausgeschlossen. Bitte haben Sie Verständnis, dass wir die Kosten hierfür leider nicht übernehmen dürfen.

 

As per Google Translate:

Vitamins are products which are generally considered to the group of foods. Foods, food supplements, medical foods and dietary called food - including products for infants or young children - are excluded by the drug policy from the obligation to perform. Please understand that we are not allowed to take the costs thereof.

 

I guess this doesnt necesarily mean that TK wont cover supplements prescribed by a doctor. I just never asked them this explicitly.

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Your doctor can give you further information if you feel you need certain vitamins. I have a couple of autoimmune conditions that can cause vitamin deficiencies and I know that things like high-dose vitamin D, vitamin B12 shots and iron infusions would be covered if my doctor deemed them necessary.

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I have health issues that affect some of my vitamin levels. To be honest, they only check the ones they have reason to suspect you might have problems with, so who knows how many are deficient. However, my D was checked by my endocrinologist, as I have autoimmune thyroid issues and D deficiency is very common (among digestive issues hindering great absorption). I had a severe deficiency so was told to take 1000 units a day, which the OTC versions aren't really adequate to use for anyway. Later, when trying to concieve, my levels were also registering as a bit low so I was given the script again. Now that I am pregnant, I get it as well. I don't always take it in summer, except when I was trying for a baby.

 

The benefits of it are readily apparent and poor nutrition is a common cause for meany illnesses that actually cost the insurances (and you premium payers) lots of money. For example, a lot of people suffering mild depression could benefit from a good dose of Vitamin D, especially in winter. However, lack of awareness of this or resistance to paying for the vitamins may send the person to the doctor and prescribed a much more expensive antidepressant, in the end costing more for the system than supporting vitamin coverage.

 

Now, taking high doses without medical need or supervision is neither helpful or always safe. So, I don't think they should be covered blanketly, but I wish more doctors focussed on making sure levels were right before prescribing drugs. I'd still need my thyroid meds, but with good vitamin D supplementation, I am able to handle many more of my symptoms without need for expensive drugs. Just because you don't understand the science behind vitamins and nutrition doesn't mean it's pseudoscience (which I hate, btw.) Nutrition, of which vitamin regulation is a part, is NOT the same. It is science based on biochemistry.

 

The prescription you get when you have a medical need is the green one, meaning I have to pay more for it than the other meds, but it is covered partially by insurance, but it's worth it for the benefits it gives me. If you suspect you have a deficiency, speak with your doctor. However, unless you have a medical condition that is linked to it or a family history of the deficiency, many docs are hesitant to test you. You could pay to be tested privately and if deficient could submit that to your doctor as proof to get support.

 

I suspect I may have issues with more than D, but as it is not common to check, no one has. I am taking magnesium for pregnancy issues and to help with health issues made worse by pregnancy, but do not get a script for that one, in spite of it being recommended by my doctor. I don't mind, though. It's worth the cost for my baby and the excellent care I am getting from my doctor more than makes up for what it costs. In the US, the cost of all the scans and later the birth would put us in debt. I can afford a few vitamins as part of my contribution.

 

Still, if Vitamin D is medically necessary, I do not feel guilty for asking my insurance to cover it, as it is as necessary as a medication in that case. After all, my husband does pay a ton of money in premiums every month.

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