What made you smile today?

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Do you remember your milk man?

 

I read an article in a German newspaper today about the return of the milk man in England, which brought back happy childhood memories.

 

Our milk man Mr Jackson, also delivered potatoes and joghurt in later years. We always ordered silver top milk but our neighbours orderd gold top milk which had a cream topping. The birds seemed to like the gold top milk because they would often peck open the bottle tops .

 

https://www.msn.com/de-de/finanzen/top-stories/briten-erfreut-%C3%BCber-r%C3%BCckkehr-des-milchmanns/ar-AATM4it?ocid=msedgdhp&pc=U531

 

 

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10 hours ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

Do you remember your milk man?

 

 

 

I read an article in a German newspaper today about the return of the milk man in England, which brought back happy childhood memories.

 

 

 

Our milk man Mr Jackson, also delivered potatoes and joghurt in later years. We always ordered silver top milk but our neighbours orderd gold top milk which had a cream topping. The birds seemed to like the gold top milk because they would often peck open the bottle tops .

 

 

 

https://www.msn.com/de-de/finanzen/top-stories/briten-erfreut-%C3%BCber-r%C3%BCckkehr-des-milchmanns/ar-AATM4it?ocid=msedgdhp&pc=U531

 

 

 

 

 

Our milkman came round on an electric truck, which barely made it up the hill to us sometimes.

In the Winter the milk sometimes froze and popped the aluminium top off

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And in the summer, because we lived in a village and the Milkman came mid morning, the milk had gone sour in the heat of the day. Supermarkets were the death of delivered milk and of so many things. Do we really have more choice now?

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28 minutes ago, French bean said:

And in the summer, because we lived in a village and the Milkman came mid morning, the milk had gone sour in the heat of the day. Supermarkets were the death of delivered milk and of so many things. Do we really have more choice now?

 

Well - with good milk to begin with, the sour milk was a refreshing beverage. And still good enough for cooking or baking.

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Sean Connery declined the roles of Gandalf in Lord of the Rings and Morpheus in The Matrix, because he „just didn‘t get it“, ie. the script.

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20 hours ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

Do you remember your milk man?

 

I do, he would come round and deliver where we lived in the States when I was a kid.

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 It was the same with the little bottles of milk we had to drink at school, stone cold in the winter and luke warm in the summer.

@Robinson: Thanks for posting the video of Benny Hill, absolutely hilarious. 

" And he looked up in pained surprise As the concrete hardened crust Of a stale pork pie caught him in the eye And Ernie bit the dust" Brilliant.

@Metall: I've learned something new on this Forum again. I didn't know you had a milk man in the U.S. I thought it was a British thing. 

 

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6 minutes ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

I've learned something new on this Forum again. I didn't know you had a milk man in the U.S. I thought it was a British thing. 

 

Oh yes, very much so. We would get the classic glass bottles with a tinfoil cap.

"About 30 percent of milk was still delivered to homes in the 1960s":

https://food52.com/blog/20229-milkmen-history

 

And here's a funny satire about US milkmen:

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/did-a-milkman-father-800-children/

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36 minutes ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

 I've learned something new on this Forum again. I didn't know you had a milk man in the U.S. I thought it was a British thing. 

Our milkman was a family friend and he once took me along on his 5 am route!  I’ve never forgotten that.  😄

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My parents had a milkman in the 1970s and 1980s in the Netherlands. He brought one crate per week. Very convenient. At school we had school milk for free. Was promoted by the government: „melk de witte motor“ (milk the white engine).

 

PS- few times a year a knife grinder came door to door as well: you could sharpen your knives, scissors, etc. 

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1 hour ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

@Metall: I've learned something new on this Forum again. I didn't know you had a milk man in the U.S. I thought it was a British thing. 

It was exciting to wake up in Chicago's frigid winters to see the cream rising almost two inches from the milk bottle, with the cap and cover still on top.

I don't remember a horse pulling the milk wagon, but the coal man had a horse.

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16 minutes ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

I can remember a coal man with a horse too.  Are there  coal mines in Chicago?

Illinois was famous for its coal, including the prized anthracite. My family bought the cheaper bituminous, soft, coal. It was dusty and messy, unlike the hard and shiny anthracite.

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49 minutes ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

I can remember a coal man with a horse too.  Are there  coal mines in Chicago?

In the '50s we also had a mobile Co-op shop come around once a week, it had groceries on one side, fruit and veg the other side and fish & meat on the back, a Co-op bakery van also came around daily.

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We had a milk man in Dublin back when I was a child.  I remember he used to come around every morning and deliver the milk to our doorstep.  During the school holidays and on weekends, his son used to come with him, following the milk float on his bike.  He was a couple of years younger than me, but I often saw him and admired his stamina, especially in winter.  He went on to be a rather famous cyclist in the end, Stephen Roche (our milkman's son) went on to win Tour de France in 1987, among other titles.

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