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JK Rowling's portrayal of characters

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Mr. Harris probably wishes he hadn't died, too!

 

Unless he was sick to death of playing Dumbledore, that is. ;)

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Does anyone here ever read or write essays on character analysis or plot dissection? For any books I mean..not just Harry Potter. What about that thorn known as Fan Fiction? Some can be good but much of it is pig slop.

 

If you tag it onto the tradition of literary pastiche it can be traced well into the end of the 19th century and farther back. The most familiar examples which come to mind are the countless “further adventures” of Sherlock Holmes for which A. Conan Doyle can take no direct responsibility, or any of the 200+ apocryphal Oz books never published by Reilly & Lee. And, for the record, there was Tolkein fanfic back in the late ‘60s as well. And then came Star Trek and Star Wars and eventually the internet enabled mass distribution of fan fics.

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sounds like a quality night- hopefully your mood improved.

 

i'll give some thought to my comments regarding all the above later (that's if the kids behave this afternoon and i have time- i'll have 5 kids (ages 4-7) and 2 dogs for a few hours- ugh!)

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i'll have 5 kids (ages 4-7) and 2 dogs for a few hours- ugh!)

alright, Molly ;)

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fine w/ me i'll be her if you'd like. if that means her past few hours have been hell (not b/c of the kids, but rather my bosses dog). oh well work is now done! :-P

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hello! Dana are you there and bored too? so let's get this discussion going. soon i'll have 2 more kids here, but doesn't mean much :)

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Disclaimer:

If you have not read Harry Potter, if you have but couldn’t care less about discussing it, then no reason to bother with this thread.

 

The following is a Harry Potter major spoiler if you have not read the sixth book. Therefore I have hid the text. Just highlight if you want to read it. I am trying to find out how to make it invisible..so give me a moment.

 

It is about JK Rowling’s explanation of (if you can even call it that) the connection between body and soul and how the plot of the entire series circles around this.

 

 

In the 3rd book, PoA we hear for the first time that JKR does consider the soul to be something separate to the human body which is, in itself not unusual. This is the belief that almost all mundane society holds. In the PoA we learn of dark creatures, Dementors (named for dementia) who can literally suck the soul from the body of the human and we are later led to belief that Dementor’s themselves are indeed the result of such an act (end of book 4).

But in Book 5 when Sirius is killed, Harry goes searching for answers about the nature of a soul and learns from Nearly Headless Nick that ghost are not souls, they are rather the imprint of a soul left on earth.

In book sixth the whole “soul

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have to go check on the kids to make sure they're still alive then will read the "invisible" text. oh i like this! magic on the internet!

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I agree with that. He may not be a good man though, but I think he is on the "good" side. But for what reasons?

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hmm.. have to digest what you said Dana (in your magic invisible text).

 

i'm still not sure on what i think of Snape.

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Some new original content for children from JK:

 

"The Ickabog"

 

Quote

Chapter 1

King Fred the Fearless

Once upon a time, there was a tiny country called Cornucopia, which had been ruled for centuries by a long line of fair-haired kings. The king at the time of which I write was called King Fred the Fearless. He’d announced the ‘Fearless’ bit himself, on the morning of his coronation, partly because it sounded nice with ‘Fred’, but also because he’d once managed to catch and kill a wasp all by himself, if you didn’t count five footmen and the boot boy.

King Fred the Fearless came to the throne on a huge wave of popularity. He had lovely yellow curls, fine sweeping moustaches and looked magnificent in the tight breeches, velvet doublets, and ruffled shirts that rich men wore at the time. Fred was said to be generous, smiled and waved whenever anyone caught sight of him and looked awfully handsome in the portraits that were distributed throughout the kingdom, to be hung in town halls. The people of Cornucopia were most happy with their new king, and many thought he’d end up being even better at the job than his father, Richard the Righteous, whose teeth (though nobody had liked to mention it at the time) were rather crooked.

King Fred was secretly relieved to find out how easy it was to rule Cornucopia. In fact, the country seemed to run itself. Nearly everybody had lots of food, the merchants made pots of gold, and Fred’s advisors took care of any little problem that arose. All that was left for Fred to do was beam at his subjects whenever he went out in his carriage and go hunting five times a week with his two best friends, Lord Spittleworth and Lord Flapoon.

Spittleworth and Flapoon had large estates of their own in the country, but they found it much cheaper and more amusing to live at the palace with the king, eating his food, hunting his stags, and making sure that the king didn’t get too fond of any of the beautiful ladies at court. They had no wish to see Fred married, because a queen might spoil all their fun. For a time, Fred had seemed to rather like Lady Eslanda, who was as dark and beautiful as Fred was fair and handsome, but Spittleworth had persuaded Fred that she was far too serious and bookish for the country to love her as queen. Fred didn’t know that Lord Spittleworth had a grudge against Lady Eslanda. He’d once asked her to marry him, but she’d turned him down.

Lord Spittleworth was very thin, cunning, and clever. His friend Flapoon was ruddy-faced, and so enormous that it required six men to heave him onto his massive chestnut horse. Though not as clever as Spittleworth, Flapoon was still far sharper than the king.

Both lords were expert at flattery, and pretending to be astonished by how good Fred was at everything from riding to tiddlywinks. If Spittleworth had a particular talent, it was persuading the king to do things that suited Spittleworth, and if Flapoon had a gift, it was for convincing the king that nobody on earth was as loyal to the king as his two best friends.

Fred thought Spittleworth and Flapoon were jolly good chaps. They urged him to hold fancy parties, elaborate picnics, and sumptuous banquets, because Cornucopia was famous, far beyond its borders, for its food. Each of its cities was known for a different kind, and each was the very best in the world.

 

Rest over here

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On 4/25/2006, 11:43:41, mere said:

not saying anything wrong w/ Babysitters Club. just saying that Harry Potter 1- is not junk 2- is not any worse than any other books. and Rowlings uses some intersting things in book which are a bit more intellectually stimulating (use of other cultures and history and languages-at least greek/latin for the spells etc) then say if Mary Ann and Logan are getting along fine or going to break up.

 

so nothing wrong w/ it Moilv! :)

Reading is reading, Kids who are engrossed in Harry Potter aren¡t playing video games. 

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