Additional dental insurance

31 posts in this topic

Hey John g. it's that money under your pillow after you've just lost one. Many of the ones I've extracted were so bad the patient had to leave a note for the tooth fairy. :D

 

I'm talking about additional insurances. And yes, my experiences are from a US perspective. Medical insurance is a huge headache in the USA, I'm sure you've heard. Dental insurances are mostly a ripoff. It's not really insurance, it's a "plan" and the insurance company always gets their cut out of the doctor-patient relationship.

 

So can you actually come out ahead with additional insurances in the German system? Specifically you can get more in benefits than you actually paid into it? It just doesn't seem possible...

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Ah, fair enough! I like tooth fairies! :) I remeber mine well in my childhood! An old English coin - sixpence - wow, that was big time chocolate buying afterwards! Mind you, I also remember as a child having gas at the dentist´s ...still remember some swirling around in my head..was about 8 or 9 then... (please note: I was born in 1952 and some improvements have possibly taken place since then!).

 

Zahnsan: my only experience with US dentists was in 1973: I had 600 dollars, was in LA getting ready to travel through Mexico, had breakfast, broke a tooth on a steak in some steak house place at breakfast time ( was amazed people ate steak at breakfast time!), went to some dentist or other, got the tooth fixed and paid 50 dollars. This was over 40 years ago!!!

 

MASSIVE dent on my traveller´s budget!!!

 

Back to topic: yes, sometimes people in Germany pay into an insurance and gain from it. Amazing stuff. Just depends that people know the terms and conditions and are honest about their health in the application and know what they are paying for.

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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As a dentist I have spent a considerable part of my career explaining or attempting to explain dental insurance.

 

One of the first things patients need to learn is that buying dental insurance when you have a problem is like buying car insurance after you've had an accident. (you'd be better off paying for repairs)

While I think medical insurance is a necessity in our world, at least major medical coverage, dental insurance is mostly money down the drain. That is as long as you are paying for it yourself. If you get it as a benefit with your employment, no problem then.

 

let me explain...

Medical coverage will normally pay in the case of severe trauma, say if you were in a motor vehicle accident. In some cases the auto insurance pays. If on a work site, yet another company normally pays, or the worker's comp fund.

However,

for routine maintenance, cleanings wisdom teeth or even a bad tooth that needs treatment, how does it benefit you to pay the insurance company? Why not just go ahead and pay the dentist?

Car insurance doesn't cover new tires or routine maintenance.

Nobody has grocery insurance, right?

stay with me now...

When you buy insurance, your aren't buying dental or medical care, you are buying "coverage."

I don't want to sound cheeky, but after years of seeing patients hand big money over to insurance companies over time, it has occurred to me that insurance companies have found a way to make themselves totally indispensable on one hand and totally useless on another.

An insurance company has never helped me treat patients. Never, ever. Insurance companies make billions of dollars in "health care" but they never see any patients. They don't do medical or pharmaceutical research, they don't have treatment centers, or doctors (who see patients).

They do not add any value to health care, they just suck money out of the health care system and call it "profit".

 

I have seen patients hand over thousands of dollars over time for "coverage" and not need anything but routine care for years. Then all of a sudden they need something like an implant or a root canal and crown.

The insurance company says, OK, we'll pay up to $1000 (whatever their annual maximum is) and that's it. The patient ends up having to pay the rest of the bill out of pocket despite having paid thousands over the years for "coverage".

 

Instead of buying supplemental insurance, why not put the money aside in a dental fund that is yours to spend as you see fit?

 

just my $.02

 

Part of which you say is true..and part isn't

 

Supplementary insurance in Germany is a business - that is clear. But for most people (80%) there is some basic coverage already with public health insurance. It pays certain lump-sums for fillings, bridges, crown and implants. The German private insurance companies only have to offer coverage for part of the rest (which is usually 50% or more of the total costs). And that means you have to work with statistics, law of averages and what not. Even a 100% claims-statistic can still be a good deal for an insurance company due to the earnings/profits on interest (well in current low-interest times this is getting harder and harder, but the theory still applies.

 

And as with every insurance, the question is WHEN you are going to hit with the big bills for replacements/implants. if someone would know today at age 35 that with age 55 he'll need 5.000 EUR worth of dental work, he can easily put money asside for that (let us forget about the tendency of people to still spend that money in the meantime).

But some people will need the treatment already at age 40, some with 50, some with 70. this is why you pay into an insurance - to balance the risk over many people and time.

 

Yes, there will be cases where the supplementary insurance turns out to be a "bad deal". But nobody complains if he is paying for car insurance or house insurance the entire life without ever wrecking/totalling the car or having your house burn down. It is risk coverage, plain and simple. Some you win, some you lose. But don't whine if you don't pay and suddenly the house does burn down...

 

Risk coverage is always about potential damage/risks. If you are lucky and you never have to use it, it was still a good deal, money well spent.

 

but I grant you that there are enough insurances outthere who are happy to collect the money but hesitant to part from it when there is a claim. this is, if you excuse my saying this, why people need a good broker to find the right insurance. Get the least expensive one and you are bound for trouble eventually (with no-one at your side to assist you with your claim as a broker does).

 

Cheerio

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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<MASSIVE dent on my traveller´s budget!!!>

 

This reminded me of a certain episode of Coupling from the BBC2 & 3. If you're not familiar with Coupling you owe it to yourself to check it out.

 

$50 for a crown. That was a bargain. When I started in private practice gold was about $260 an oz., and the the Euro cost about 82 cents. I should have held on to my scrap metal and bought euros. Who knew?

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Hi again everyone, I now have my professional Facebook page up.

 

I'm still shopping for a staff. Will need a Dental Hygienist, Front Desk person and a chairside assistant at the minimum.

 

You can easily contact me on this FB page.

 

https://www.facebook.com/Dr.DevinSavage

 

I would really appreciate referrals if you know someone looking for a job in a dental office here in the Stuttgart area.

 

Sincerely,

zahnsan

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Hey ya'll... sorry to pounce on this dead thread but also a specific question about supplemental dental insurance.

I'm insured via TK, which doesn't cover dental, and while my teeth are healthy/stable I have a moderate case of periodontal disease, i.e. recessed gums. I am considering taking out dental insurance and NOT lying about this condition. I'm expecting a premium on everything related to periodontics, but I'm not sure if everything else will also get a premium tacked on (i.e. accidents, broken teeth). Any idea as to how these premiums are calculated?

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Who says TK doesn´t cover dental? My mother had periodontal disease and was covered by her public health insurance.

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1 hour ago, Pandekage said:

Hey ya'll... sorry to pounce on this dead thread but also a specific question about supplemental dental insurance.

I'm insured via TK, which doesn't cover dental, and while my teeth are healthy/stable I have a moderate case of periodontal disease, i.e. recessed gums. I am considering taking out dental insurance and NOT lying about this condition. I'm expecting a premium on everything related to periodontics, but I'm not sure if everything else will also get a premium tacked on (i.e. accidents, broken teeth). Any idea as to how these premiums are calculated?

You posted this a few days ago on this forum and you were given advice!

 

On the Life in Hamburg thread

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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any ongoing periodontal disease will usually lead to a rejection of an application  by private health insurance companies, sorry... too late for that now.

 

Cheerio

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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7 hours ago, fraufruit said:

Our public insurance covers all of our periodontal disease check ups and treatments. Yes, we both have it.

Oh okay, that makes me feel better, thanks. Was worrying about my teeth falling out.

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