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Earthquake in San Francisco Bay Area

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There was an earthquake with a magnitude of 6.0 this morning in American Canyon, CA, app. 60 km northeast of San Francisco, in a depth of app. 10 km. Aftershocks varied from 1.8 to 2.3 magnitude. A tsunami bulletin has been issued.

 

According to katheliz the tremor was bad enough to knock over a vase and some cutting boards that were leaning against a cupboard. She says that, judging from the direction the cutting boards fell, the tremor went north-south. It was felt as far south as Hayward, app. 60 km southeast of San Francisco.

 

Chile also reported an earthquake of similar magnitude.

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There is a lot of damage around the epicenter of the quake, four or five miles from where I live. Napa, which has numerous masonry buildings that predate 1900, is hard hit. No word of major injuries or deaths. Even in my city there are cracked show-room windows and I saw a photo of a car apparently damaged by a falling chimney.

It's still dark here, but once it's light I'll check my house for cracks and poke my nose in the garage to see what may now be on the floor - let's hope the jars of jam survived the shake.

I'm hearing reports that the shaking may have lasted up to twenty seconds. These things always seem long, but I thought it was more like ten seconds. It was very shaky and very noisy, and even ten seconds was far too long.

Ooops, little aftershock. The TV station was interviewing a geologist who said, laughing, the aftershocks could go on for weeks. Geologists have a funny sense of humor.

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There have been multiple earthquakes off the coast of Oregon over the last few hours of which the largest magnitude 5.8 ... hope that s relieved a bit of pressure and it is  not a precursor to worse to come :mellow:

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@kaffeemitmilch, you can relax this time. 2.2? Not enough to write home about. :)

Of course, whenever we feel the shaking we think about The Big One, but it's taking its time.

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The entire West coast area of the USA is seismologically active.

Where do you think the chain of volcanoes (Cascade mountains) come from?

In principle a volcanic eruption is likely to take place almost anywhere in that area - there have been two in the contiguous states in the last 110 years.

 

Some time ago whilst on a business trip to Silicon Valley I went out for dinner with a German colleague who had previously moved out there for a number of years.

He said initially it had worried him at night lying in bed & listening to the glasses being shaken in the cupboards.

 

 

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In 1989 we were living in an apartment house build on alluvial soil, next to a creek that had meandered back and forth for centuries. When the Loma Prieta quake hit I could see the asphalt over the loose soil heaving up and down in shallow ripples, 80 miles away from the epicenter. It was a 6.9 quake that did lots of damage and killed a lot of people. But even it wasn't The Big One.

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6 hours ago, katheliz said:

@kaffeemitmilch, you can relax this time. 2.2? Not enough to write home about. :)

Of course, whenever we feel the shaking we think about The Big One, but it's taking its time.

Ah are you in the Bay? I guess I can panic when you stop posting on the forum...

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2 minutes ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

Ah are you in the Bay?

Haha! Close to it, but not in it.

I know what you meant - yes, I live in the SF Bay Area. :) Today's quakelet was about 20 miles from me as the crow flies, and I didn't feel it.

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44 minutes ago, HEM said:

The entire West coast area of the USA is seismologically active.

Where do you think the chain of volcanoes (Cascade mountains) come from?

In principle a volcanic eruption is likely to take place almost anywhere in that area - there have been two in the contiguous states in the last 110 years.

 

Some time ago whilst on a business trip to Silicon Valley I went out for dinner with a German colleague who had previously moved out there for a number of years.

He said initially it had worried him at night lying in bed & listening to the glasses being shaken in the cupboards.

 

 

In all the years I was there, I might have felt one weak tremor, but I'm not even sure of this. They basically just passed me by. But I even got trained in community emergency response for the big one, which was overdue even then almost 20 years ago. If the Hayward fault cracks, basically every hospital in the East Bay is toast. It's not a great prognosis.

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Hospitals are at risk, but for a Big One everything's at risk, especially on the Hayward. It runs near my son Fuenfling's house and it runs through the football stadium on the Berkeley campus. The hospital where I worked, a mile from me, is newly-rebuilt, down to three levels from seven, but who knows? It's less than half a mile from the Bay and the soils there are probably chancy. Then we start looking at freeways. As you know, I-80 runs through the East and North Bay areas. If overpasses collapse, emergency vehicles and autos bearing patients will be blocked; worse, very few of the doctors who work at my hospital live where they could use surface roads to reach the facility. 
And then I have to worry about my little sisters living in the Seattle area, within reach of a Mt. Rainier eruption that could devastate almost everything up there, not to mention the subduction zones along the coast that could drown thousands.

Yeah, living on the Pacific Coast has its dangers. But the Midwest has tornadoes and double plus serious winter and mosquitoes every year - I think I'll put up with a sporadic quake or two. :) 

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25 minutes ago, katheliz said:

But the Midwest has tornadoes and double plus serious winter and mosquitoes every year - I think I'll put up with a sporadic quake or two. :) 

Don't forget the people...

 

Just kidding, mostly. MOSTLY.

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6 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Are they doing any fracking around those areas? It has contributed to many small earthquakes.

I worked briefly for oil & gas offshore industry and I can tell you the big concern are the big under sea floor caves these assholes are creating. They are genuinely scared a big earthquake and tsunami is created by their shitty handling. When they extract the oil or gas, that leaves huge caves. Sometimes these are filled with seawater, but most of the times they pump mud from the seafloor into those caves, to force the remaining gas out. But mud is much denser than water, so expect problems.

But AFAIK there are none in north california.

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