Moving to Germany Lower Saxony

21 posts in this topic

Hello all I am new to this site. So first wanted to say hello as I just did and hope to be here for a while.

 

Right now as the title says my wife and I will be moving to Germany very soon she is from Germany and we are about to have our first child, all of her family is from Germany so we would like to have her parents apart of the child first few months or years. My parents already have been around 3 grandchild so its only fair I think.

 

Anyway I only know a little Germany, I think I am better at speaking it when I am drunk but I know that is wrong. My wife's sister and mother keeps telling me about having to take a German integration course which I think will be useful no matter since I need to really learn how to speak and understand so I can finally be apart of the conversations and finally get the jokes :D .

 

Does anyone know what I should expect from the classes such as times (early morning until night) how long (everyday monday to friday or more or less) and how hard are the classes (am I supposed to be an expert already or is the class for people who have no idea at all). I am a pretty good stupid here in America, having taken Spanish classes in High school and other normally classes with ok grades.

 

Lastly I know I shouldn't worry but should I because I am a Jamaican aka black with dreads, I know in the larger cities such as Koln and Berlin they are used to more didn't types of people but Will be in a smaller town and they are used to seeing me at least once a year but for a few months what should I expect? I know things will be fine but just looking for what people think or have been though.

 

Besides all this I am very excited to be moving soon and I can't wait, hopefully I can get a job teaching basketball or american football or even sprints in track but anything is ok in the beginning but I can't wait to fully understand and be able to be by myself and have a good time in Germany. Thanks for any advise or any kind words or anything that people are willing to offer. Have a great day or night everyone

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I have a friend who's originally from Cape Verde and has a German wife. They live in a small town and he gets along well with everyone there. The key for him was learning German (and having a friendly personality).

 

You are not expected to have any knowledge of German when you start the integration course and if I were you, I'd focus completely on learning German for at least your first 6 months here, then worry about work.

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I live in a small town in Lower Saxony and one of my coworkers is a black guy with dreads. We don't work in the same dept. so I've never talked to him much more than to say good morning. Hence I don't know where he's from or if he gets funny looks but at work, as long as he does his work like everybody else, nobody bothers him. He is a friendly guy too and he does speak German.

 

I'd say start by taking the integration course. You will meet all kinds of people there and probably have some fun. If you already speak a little, they might assess you as not having to start from the beginning. I just took the last 2 months of a 6 month course. The course I took was morning until 1pm or so, 5 days a week and we had a bit of homework too.

 

The integration course consists of 3 levels of German, A1, A2 and B1. If you are taking a course 5 days a week, each level takes around 2 months so 6 months total. There is a separate orientation course as well which teaches you about German society and is mandatory for those who are applying for citizenship but I did not take that one.

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Hello all I am new to this site. So first wanted to say hello as I just did and hope to be here for a while.

 

Right now as the title says my wife and I will be moving to Germany very soon she is from Germany and we are about to have our first child, all of her family is from Germany so we would like to have her parents apart of the child first few months or years. My parents already have been around 3 grandchild so its only fair I think.

 

Anyway I only know a little Germany, I think I am better at speaking it when I am drunk but I know that is wrong. My wife's sister and mother keeps telling me about having to take a German integration course which I think will be useful no matter since I need to really learn how to speak and understand so I can finally be apart of the conversations and finally get the jokes .

 

Does anyone know what I should expect from the classes such as times (early morning until night) how long (everyday monday to friday or more or less) and how hard are the classes (am I supposed to be an expert already or is the class for people who have no idea at all). I am a pretty good stupid here in America, having taken Spanish classes in High school and other normally classes with ok grades.

 

Lastly I know I shouldn't worry but should I because I am a Jamaican aka black with dreads, I know in the larger cities such as Koln and Berlin they are used to more didn't types of people but Will be in a smaller town and they are used to seeing me at least once a year but for a few months what should I expect? I know things will be fine but just looking for what people think or have been though.

 

Besides all this I am very excited to be moving soon and I can't wait, hopefully I can get a job teaching basketball or american football or even sprints in track but anything is ok in the beginning but I can't wait to fully understand and be able to be by myself and have a good time in Germany. Thanks for any advise or any kind words or anything that people are willing to offer. Have a great day or night everyone

 

Hello Crazie, welcome to TT. this is s good forum to find out many aspects of german life. Please use the search button on top right of the page to find out about relevant information.

 

As to the integration course, as mentioned by others here, it is a 600 hours course 5 days a week from 8.30 am till 1 pm. Initially they will give a small test to check your level and then recommend how many hours are good for you. At the end of the course one can take B1 level exam ( consisting of reading writing, hearing and speaking) which is the mandatory level for future use. Besides these 600 hours of german language, there is additional 60 hours of orientation course about Germany and your specific state.

 

as to job scenario, if you are good at sports, then maybe you can join some club as a trainer??, but schools and regular institutions require certification and german language proficiency.

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One thing you'll need to get used to is people staring at you. It's just what Germans do and generally has little to do with racism although there is quite a bit of Neonazi activity in Lower Saxony. It would depend on which area of the state you move to.

 

If you'll be anywhere near Hannover you can joint the Hannover4EnglishSpeakers Facebook group.

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Great information people thank you very much, most of these things that you guys hace shared wasnt even knew by my wifes family and they still live there. That is most of my questions have been answered and it is very appreciated and I will spend the rest of my time just going though the forums and reading up on things.

 

Once again thanks for all the advice I do not feel so alone about this move.

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What formal educational qualifications do you have? Have you thought about what you'd want to do once you learn German? Working as a teacher is not possible without the necessary formal qualifications.

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In America I am certified to be a personal trainer and I have background in teaching like a gym teacher and right now I am a tech in physical therapy. So a few random things

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In America I am certified to be a personal trainer and I have background in teaching like a gym teacher and right now I am a tech in physical therapy. So a few random things

 

Do you have a university degree? Teacher's College?

 

I would recommend that you start your research by reading this thread.

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OK then bring every scrap of paperwork you have pertaining to those qualifications.

 

Westvan speaks the truth. If you don't have anything on paper, get some reference letters from your current employer(s) before you come. Positive, if possible, of course, but even if they just confirm what you do/did and when, that's better than nothing. Germans love to see a piece of paper for every little thing you've ever done, when you're looking for a job.

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When you are in Germany you might want to consider talking to these guys Beratung Anerkennung I went to them. It is for free and they will let you know whether or not you need to have your degree assessed and recognized. They will also point you to the competent authority (always a big help knowing who is responsible when dealing with German bureaucracy).

It might be a good idea to have your degree recognized no matter what. As others have pointed out Germans love official papers and depending on where you will live not many German employers will be familiar with American degrees. So having an official paper saying that your degree is equivalent to a German Bachelor or Master might be good. There are of course costs involved (translation and fees). But talk to the Beratung first.

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I have a degree in sports and exercise studies

 

Teachers in Germany usually need to be able to teach two subjects, you'll need a 2nd subject and possibly an MEd.

 

Before you make concrete plans to move here, I would highly recommend that you look into having your qualifications evaluated, determine what you would need to teach here, and then decide whether you're willing to go back to school for a few years. Education is Ländersache and each Bundesland has their own rules. The Niedersächsisches Kultusministerium has an info sheet (Merkblatt NBQFG) providing details on what foreign teachers need to do in order to teach here. Have your wife read it and translate it for you.

 

Unfortunately there are countless stories on TT of German/foreign couples moving here where the foreign partner cannot find a skilled position and the German partner doesn't want to leave. It is much better to consider these possibilities before you come.

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I have got a job in Oldenburg, can anyone tell me more about Oldenburg.
i have read that cycling with a bicycle is good because Oldenburg is bicycle friendly city.
A question I have up to what time the groceries shops like Rewe, Aldi, Edeka do work?

Here in Munich they work up to 20:00 so I am not sure if they work so late over there.

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4 hours ago, amurati said:

I have got a job in Oldenburg, can anyone tell me more about Oldenburg.
i have read that cycling with a bicycle is good because Oldenburg is bicycle friendly city.
A question I have up to what time the groceries shops like Rewe, Aldi, Edeka do work?

Here in Munich they work up to 20:00 so I am not sure if they work so late over there.

 

Depends on exact locations, but in general it is Bavaria that is backwards and Hail Jesus! in it's business laws and regulations. In the main cities of Niedersachsen (of which Oldenburg is one), grocery stores are generally open until 10pm. Imagine that. By leaving Bavaria, you will leave the 1960s and step into the early 2000s. (You have to leave Germany all together if you want the current year). All of northern Germany is flat as a pancake, so yes bicycling is good. There are bike lanes almost everywhere. You'll need a good waterproof jacket though.

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I googled a couple of stores in Oldenburg and a few Rewe stores are open until midnight and Netto until 10 so no worries.

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I live in lower saxony in town of 800 hohegeisse. We have 6 major supermarkets within 10 km all open until 8 pm. We even have a little local grocery store in town  that is open everyday and even on Sunday for 3 hours. Your city is much larger.  I am pretty sure rent will be much cheaper and you will not have to stand in line to see a apartment, but dont know details in your specific city. Lower saxony is great and for the most part people are friendly

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2 hours ago, lunasuenos said:

I live in lower saxony in town of 800 hohegeisse. We have 6 major supermarkets within 10 km all open until 8 pm. We even have a little local grocery store in town  that is open everyday and even on Sunday for 3 hours. Your city is much larger.  I am pretty sure rent will be much cheaper and you will not have to stand in line to see a apartment, but dont know details in your specific city. Lower saxony is great and for the most part people are friendly

 

Oldenburg is a student city, a collector city for the surrounding rural areaa, and is commutable from Bremen, plus is considered a good place generally. As such, rent is not cheap, though of course it's better than Germany's major cities. Generally, there is the same housing crunch as many places in Germany. You'll find something eventually, but line-ups are a guarantee. 

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