Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Hof Foreign Authority

4 posts in this topic

Recent email communication with the Chicago German Consulate has resulted in their hesitancy to help us while in the US to obtain our temporary residence permit and have suggested that we do this when we get to Germany.

The problem with this is that I retire June 30, 2015, sell all large possessions, sea freight all small possessions, fly to Germany and completely close all reasons to return to the US. If the 90 days they allow on a US Passport is not quite enough to gain temporary residence then it becomes a very large problem.

We have all things in order; we own our apartment in Hof, will have sufficient income via pension, will have international health insurance, have family that lives permanently in Hof and will also work as an independent contractor for an Architect firm here in the US. I have indicated all of this to the German Consulate here in Chicago and here is the result of their last communication:

 

As US citizen you can enter Germany without a visa and stay there for 90 days in a period of 6 months. During this time you will be allowed to apply for a residence permit if you want to stay longer than 90 days. But we would recommend you to get in contact with the Alien Office (Auslaenderbehoerde) of the city where you plan to stay in Germany and to discuss your case with them in order to get further information about the procedure in Germany. Please contact them BEFORE you travel to Germany as it could be that a residence permit might not be approved. Please note: in General a stay for more than 90 days for visitor's or tourist purpose is not possible. A stay for longer than 90 days without a residence permit is against the law. 90 days is the maximum one can apply for. If you plan to stay above 90 days in Germany you must apply for a residence permit. But in order to apply for a residence permit you must have a purpose that would support your application. 'Just staying' or 'just visiting' would most probably not be successful.

 

 

We were not aware that we needed a specific purpose other than we meet all criteria, so I guess the only real purpose is we want to be near family. Our family in Germany consists of daughters and their children who have never been to the US and thus live permanently in Hof.

I have tried in vain the last time I was in Hof to locate the local Hof Auslaenderbehoerde, but because I am not yet fluent in German I only ended up getting some slip that indicated my wife and I were registered with the local authorities for our 90 day visit.

Does anyone have a physical address for the Hof Auslaenderbehoerde that I can write a letter to and explain our plans and ask for their recommendations. Bottom line is we do not want to get there only to find we did not have enough time within the 90 days to acquire the temporary residence. Obviously it is much preferred to acquire this from the Chicago Consulate.

Please any help will be greatly appreciated.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As the Chicago Consulate has tried to make clear to you - in a very confused way, I'll admit - they have no jurisdiction and are not permitted to issue residence permits for Germany. AFAIK there is no way for you to do this in advance (see this TT Wiki page for more details), and you would be well-advised to leave yourself a plan B open, in case things don't work out quite the way you've planned.

 

Since your German is not up to it, I strongly suggest you ask your daughters and their families for help with this - they speak the language, are in Hof and can follow this up much better than you can from afar.

 

Another suggestion is to get in touch with Kathleen from Red Tape Translation. She is based in Berlin, but will perhaps also be able to help you with phone calls, and she is certainly a good resource person to ask for advice in terms of what to say - and what *not* to say, which could be just as, if not more important in your case.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second what the.frollein said about asking your daughters and family in Hof to help you. I believe the consulate in the US has no permission to issue residence permits.

 

Right now, I can think of some of the biggest hurdles/topics that you need answers for.

 

1. Healthcare- it is required to have German approved healthcare in Germany. Since you are planning to move here technically as retirees (although you mention you will do contract work for the US) , not sure how that would work for you, or how you will get German approved healthcare. I believe 99% of the international health insurance policies are out there are NOT sufficient for Germany. I suggest you contact Starshollow or john.q (or is it john.g? I can't remember, sorry!) here on Toytown. They are the resident experts and independent agents on this topic.

 

2. Financial situation- in order to get a residence permit, I am assuming you will need to prove your income (retirement funds, pension, etc) and savings are sufficient for a life here in Germany. You aren't going to be able to get any social support from a system you haven't contributed to. What is considered sufficient, would need to come from the Auslaenderbehoerde. I suggest you enlist the help of your daughter on this. Ask her to go to the behoerde to find out EXACTLY what the requirements are. Example of what she could say: " My parents from the U.S. are retired (but also want to do contract work for the US), and would like to move here to Germany to be near us. Can you tell me exactly what would be required of them ( financial savings in actual Euro amounts, etc) in order to receive a residence permit, and what duration of permit could they expect to receive (1 year, 2 years, etc) "? Also, have her ask if there would there be any language requirements for you to get a permit.

 

3. Contract work for a US company- if your daughter will help you out, I would also find out if you have to register as "self employed" or "freelance" or whatever, with the German Finanzamt. And she would also need to ask this question to the Auslaenderbehoerde, as it may affect your permit type. Since theoretically you want to live in Germany, you would therfore become a resident, and your income will need to be taxed. By whom, I am not an expert on that topic. But you will need an answer for this so you can register correctly with the correct German departments.

 

I would definitely have a Plan B in place.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0