Changing car tires

158 posts in this topic

Even in Frankfurt, putting tires on rims is not cheap. At Pitstop it's 64 euro for four tires, 4 euro for putting them on aluminum rims, 14 euro for balancing, and 40 euro for storage = 122 euro. If you choose to fill the tires with nitrogen, it's an additional 12 euro, and if they are also charging for swapping the wheels (even though I don't see this as swapping, but rather changing the actual tires as if one were buying new tires), then it's 36 euro on top of it = 170 euro.

 

My take is that for klingklang77 they are:

mounting tires

charging for storage

charging for swapping

charging for aluminum rims

= 144 euro

 

You'll know what they're charging for from the bill.

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4 minutes ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

 If you choose to fill the tires with nitrogen,

 

??? Who would do that? It's done on aircraft to prevent a fire risk in case of a blow out. There is a difference between 300 tonnes of 747 landing on a runway, and someone bimbling around town in a road car.

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20 minutes ago, French bean said:

??? Who would do that? It's done on aircraft to prevent a fire risk in case of a blow out. There is a difference between 300 tonnes of 747 landing on a runway, and someone bimbling around town in a road car.

 

Like almost every "car enthusiast" and everyone with a "sports car".   It has been a trend already for several year, it is actually already wearing off because the advantages are not really clear.

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23 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

Like almost every "car enthusiast" and everyone with a "sports car".   It has been a trend already for several year, it is actually already wearing off because the advantages are not really clear.

There are no advantages for cars. It is done purely for fire prevention on aircraft. I suppose it's the modern equivalent of a driver of the 60's having driving gloves and a scarf or in the 70's having a 4 point harness. Fools and money are easily separated.

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When I first moved here, I did the tyre changes in ATU out of habit - they were expensive. Got a tip of a small garage and it's a lot cheaper and quicker - 30minutes and think it was around 60€ last time for changing the wheels and storage. Also,  I actually like that a mechanic is checking them twice a year.

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4 minutes ago, French bean said:

There are no advantages for cars. It is done purely for fire prevention on aircraft. I suppose it's the modern equivalent of a driver of the 60's having driving gloves and a scarf or in the 70's having a 4 point harness. Fools and money are easily separated.

 

According to the ones who use it there is less chance of losing air therefore the tires stay with the correct pressure for longer time.

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1 hour ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

Even in Frankfurt, putting tires on rims is not cheap. At Pitstop it's 64 euro for four tires, 4 euro for putting them on aluminum rims, 14 euro for balancing, and 40 euro for storage = 122 euro. If you choose to fill the tires with nitrogen, it's an additional 12 euro, and if they are also charging for swapping the wheels (even though I don't see this as swapping, but rather changing the actual tires as if one were buying new tires), then it's 36 euro on top of it = 170 euro.

 

My take is that for klingklang77 they are:

mounting tires

charging for storage

charging for swapping

charging for aluminum rims

= 144 euro

 

You'll know what they're charging for from the bill.

 

Now, you got me curious: 

 

Montage: 18.00

Auswuchten: 43.00

Rad Ein-Ausbau: 15.00

Ventil: 4.96

Raederhotel: 55.50

 

That was 2 years ago. The past two times I had to buy tires, so it was more. It was 199 with the purchase of two new tires (change + two new tires). 

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29 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

According to the ones who use it there is less chance of losing air therefore the tires stay with the correct pressure for longer time.

Thanks for explaining Krieg but it makes it even more pointless, people change wheels twice a year and any mechanic worth his salt will check tyre pressures anyway. I can't remember the last time I pumped tyres up, maybe once only in the 9 years we've been in Germany and we've had at least one full set of tyres in that time. Next if they do need pumping up, what do they do? Carry a bottle of nitrogen with them or go to the nearest forecourt and use the machine there.

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6 minutes ago, French bean said:

Thanks for explaining Krieg but it makes it even more pointless, people change wheels twice a year and any mechanic worth his salt will check tyre pressures anyway. I can't remember the last time I pumped tyres up, maybe once only in the 9 years we've been in Germany and we've had at least one full set of tyres in that time. Next if they do need pumping up, what do they do? Carry a bottle of nitorgen with them or go to the nearest forecourt and use the machine there.

 

If you are on the go you probably just pump them back with air which is like 80% nitrogen anyways,

 

Not checking your tires pressure for months is not a good idea.  Even in good conditions you will slowly lose some pressure and this will affect your fuel economy.  You should check it like once a month, maybe every two months if you are lazy, but six months is a lot to go without checking them and you will be probably riding with wrong pressure the last months.   I myself am in the lazy side and fail to check it regularly, but I still do it here and there.

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27 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

According to the ones who use it there is less chance of losing air therefore the tires stay with the correct pressure for longer time.

Would it not be even better to use helium and get a weight reduction as well?

Not only that but if you had a puncture you could call the ADAC with a funny voice.:)

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1 hour ago, klingklang77 said:

 

Now, you got me curious: 

 

Montage: 18.00                           is  mounting tires, you ave to pay this 

Auswuchten: 43.00                     Is getting the correct weighting of the wheel

                                                    When I was in England it was only required on the front tyres, In Germany they normally do all 4. I ask them just to do the front. Saves $$$

Rad Ein-Ausbau: 15.00               is take the wheel off / on, you have to pay for this 

Ventil: 4.96                                   is new vent, ie is the fill connector faulty, maybe letting air out to fast, tyre going to fast

                                                     I would not normally not replace this bit, unless the tyre keeps on going down too fast

Raederhotel: 55.50                      is  charging for storage

 

That was 2 years ago. The past two times I had to buy tires, so it was more. It was 199 with the purchase of two new tires (change + two new tires). 

They use all types of descriptions so you never really know what you are getting and you pay more 

 

I used https://www.schindelar.de/, they are not too bad, and they are close to you and me

 

 

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1 minute ago, Krieg said:

 

If you are on the go you probably just pump them back with air which is like 80% nitrogen anyways,

 

Not checking your tires pressure for months is not a good idea.  Even in good conditions you will slowly lose some pressure and this will affect your fuel economy.  You should check it like once a month, maybe every two months if you are lazy, but six months is a lot to go without checking them and you will be probably riding with wrong pressure the last months.   I myself am in the lazy side and fail to check it regularly, but I still do it here and there.

Me too, I'm more into checking the fluids and we do so little mileage now I ought to check the fluids more often. For those wondering why, when a car sits around or just does short journeys there is more chance of the seals drying out leading to more leaks. As for checking tyres a give them a cursory look over when I walk to the car or clean it which again isn't very often.

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I think one of the “arguments” for Nitrogen was to prevent water condensation in the tyre. No doubt proffered by the petrol heads who stick on go faster racing stripes and other assorted knick knacks.

Winter tyres are marketed for under 7C and in snowy conditions. In my experience, summer tyres perform better on normal roads (no snow) down to about 5C (more grip). All-weather tyres get the job done, but not spectacularly well. Point A to B type of stuff, not the tail-wagging, burnout, 3-wheeled corner mayhem of youth, or the young at heart.

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Just now, fraufruit said:

So how does nitrogen react to that tire filler stuff when you have a flat?

Nitrogen is prized for its inertness, so I suspect it would not react with tyre filler gunk.

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17 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Thanks. We are at the mercy of tire filler gunk with our new car. No nitrogen, though.

 

Really interested to know if anyone has been able to repair a flat, even for a short while to get to a service station, using filler gunk or as I suspect it is merely the manufactures playing a joke in offering it as an alternative to a spare plus jack and tools?

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I would be interested to know that, too, but I don't see how they can get away with it if it doesn't work for at least some distance. It would be dangerous.

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My experience has been that it simply does not even inflate the tyre sufficiently to drive; both times I tried I ended up having to call the ADAC. I think it is a con trick. Both times the tyres had to be replaced, doesn't seem like plugging or putting a tube in is acceptable any more. Naturally the tyre service could not match the tyre with the other one on the axel so both had to be replaced even though not much worn, which is also a con trick!

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Gunk in a can doesn’t work because the pressure in the can is insufficient to inflate your deflated tyre. Gunk that comes with an air compressor will get you to the nearest garage, whereupon they will charge you extra to get rid of all the gunk that has now coated the inside of the wheel. 
Spare tyres work. —Unless they have a puncture!;)

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