Options on health insurance

22 posts in this topic

Hello everyone,

 

I am moving to Germany for a postdoc. I will be on a fellowship of about 2500 euro. I am a EU citizen and have a public health insurance in my home country and European health insurance card. My wife will join me in Germany in a few months. I have a few questions about health insurance in Germany:

 

1) I think that I can't enter the public health insurance, but just to be sure can you confirm that? In case I can enter, how much would I pay?

 

2) I am thinking about taking mawista science. I am aware of the possible problems with extending such an insurance. I do not plan to stay in Germany after postdoc, unless I get employed. Are there other possible problems that I should be aware of?

 

3) My wife would also take mawista science. They state that pregnancy, delivery and after-effects are 100% covered after qualifying period of 8 months. We are OK with the qualifying period, but maybe we will try to have a baby after that. Do you have any information about pregnancy and mawista science?

 

4) Do you have a suggestion for a health insurance for me and my wife, that would suit our needs?

 

Thanks,

Branimir

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I presume you have entered Health Insurance into the much-maligned Search box?

 

You would have seen that a frequent example of advice is "contact john_g or starshollow on this forum".

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1) I think that I can't enter the public health insurance, but just to be sure can you confirm that? In case I can enter, how much would I pay?

Since you come out of a national/state public health insurance of another EU-memberstate, you can actually enter the public German insurance as well. The premium will be computed on your gross income, unfortunately your grant/Stipendium counts as such. Thus you will be paying around 370 EUR per month, give or take a few EUR. However: this would also cover your wife for free if she has no own source of income higher than 375 EUR p.m. AND would also cover the baby later for free too. PLUS: no waiting time for pregnancy/maternity. Therefore it is a good bargain for you to take public insurance, even if the premiums for you and your wife at MAWISTA would be cheaper right now per month.

 

 

2) I am thinking about taking mawista science. I am aware of the possible problems with extending such an insurance. I do not plan to stay in Germany after postdoc, unless I get employed. Are there other possible problems that I should be aware of?

MAWISTA mainly offers what is only a travel-health insurance, legally speaking. It is therefore not offering fully comprehensive coverage in several areas (also make sure that pregnancy is REALLY included). And you as an EU citizen who does not require a Visa to be in Germany should actually not be allowed to use MAWISTA because these insurances are limited by law (§ 195 Abs 3 VVG) for people with a timelimited VISA (hence the limitation of 5 years duration because by then a non-EU-person can get a permanent residence permit anyway). You'd be facing seriuous problems with most German insurance companies later if you decide to stay in Germany and need to find a "real" health inurance to continue living in Germany.

 

Cheerio

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Thank you all very much for the answers!

 

If I choose a private insurance now (not mawista) I can not later switch back to public insurance? So if I am not allowed to have mawista, really my best choice is to go with the public one. Do you know the procedure for getting the public health insurance in my case?

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If I choose a private insurance now (not mawista) I can not later switch back to public insurance?

 

NO! Opting for private health insurance is a one-way street. Read Starshollow's post above.

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brnanmirr: you can contact this public insurer yourself in English:

 

http://www.tk.de/tk/english/610312

 

They will tell you what they will need from you

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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MAWISTA mainly offers what is only a travel-health insurance, legally speaking. It is therefore not offering fully comprehensive coverage in several areas.

I just saw MAWISTA recommended in another TT thread for obtaining valid insurance as on 'over 30' (age) student. MAWISTA's own self-descriptions at its website are a bit confusing, as they appear to be limited to certain categories (students, scientists, etc.) on certain webpages, and more generally available on others ("for foreigners in Germany").

 

Will Germany accept MAWISTA coverage as a valid health insurance for 'residence visa' purposes (I'm from the U.S.)?

 

Also, you refer to "not offering fully comprehensive coverage in several areas". What do its policies lack?

 

Thanks.

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Mawista will only be accepted for certain specific groups who have a limited permit and are not staying for more than 5 years. For example, it can't be used for freelance or employment permits or any other permits designed for foreigners who want to spend a longer time in Germany.

 

For what type permit will you be applying?

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Thanks. Since my primary goal initially is to become fluent in German, I would try initially to get a 'language learning' residence permit.

 

Ideally, I'd attempt to get into one of the universities as soon as I could, though I don't yet know what options there are for persons to do that who aren't fluent in German. My guess is that at least rudimentary German is required to matriculate into any kind of regular program.

 

I would not try to stay more than five years in this way, but assume that I could later apply for a different kind of residence permit, with being fluent in German possibly serving as a point in my favor.

 

Perhaps by then other options for health insurance coverage would also be available. Or perhaps there are some available now that I just don't know about (such as an inexpensive 'basic coverage' policy that's acceptable for residence permits). However, there have been none that I've come across through my own research of the subject, including here at TT.

 

That's why I'm particularly interested in whether MAWISTA might free me from having only the option of an expensive policy during my initial period of living in Germany.

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Apparently you've been researching this since 2009, which should have given you an idea of how fluid the whole issue is, and how difficult it can be, particularly for non-EU foreigners, to fulfill the requirements of the ABH. Why don't you do what you've been told to do various times - get in touch with one of the independent insurance brokers active here on TT, who can advise you on all the ins and outs of this, since they are current with the legislation and impact on expats?

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My plans have changed according to my circumstances, but moving to Germany is still a priority. My presence at TT is periodic and I'm not always certain about whether I have current information. I have contacted brokers at various times. I've sent private inquiries when corresponding about specific policies for myself. I'm also interested in the personal experience of others here who may have been in similar situations.

 

My initial reply here also included a question to one of the brokers about his comments in this thread re: Mawista (i.e., its not being comprehensive coverage in some ways, which weren't detailed). That's information that might be of use to others.

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Thanks. Since my primary goal initially is to become fluent in German, I would try initially to get a 'language learning' residence permit.

 

Ideally, I'd attempt to get into one of the universities as soon as I could, though I don't yet know what options there are for persons to do that who aren't fluent in German. My guess is that at least rudimentary German is required to matriculate into any kind of regular program.

 

I would not try to stay more than five years in this way, but assume that I could later apply for a different kind of residence permit, with being fluent in German possibly serving as a point in my favor.

 

Perhaps by then other options for health insurance coverage would also be available. Or perhaps there are some available now that I just don't know about (such as an inexpensive 'basic coverage' policy that's acceptable for residence permits). However, there have been none that I've come across through my own research of the subject, including here at TT.

 

That's why I'm particularly interested in whether MAWISTA might free me from having only the option of an expensive policy during my initial period of living in Germany.

 

 

 

My plans have changed according to my circumstances, but moving to Germany is still a priority. My presence at TT is periodic and I'm not always certain about whether I have current information. I have contacted brokers at various times. I've sent private inquiries when corresponding about specific policies for myself. I'm also interested in the personal experience of others here who may have been in similar situations.

 

My initial reply here also included a question to one of the brokers about his comments in this thread re: Mawista (i.e., its not being comprehensive coverage in some ways, which weren't detailed). That's information that might be of use to others.

 

There is a problem here between the legal side of things (which is pretty straight forward) and the reality of life in Germany, especially with regards to dealing with the Ausländeramt now and German insurance companies later.

 

Legal side: everyone who comes to Germany with a time-limited residence permit (i.e. Visa) is entitled to use a health insurance that is not computed like a life insurance (i.e. Expat insurances) for max 5 years. This is regulated under § 195 Subsection 3 VVG in connection with Section 12 Subsection 6 VAG.

Thus an American citizen who comes to Germany as a student, academic, freelancer etc would be entirely in his right to use such an insurance. These are offered for instance by CARE CONCEPT, MAWISTA, GLOBALITY or BDAE to name just the most prominent ones.

 

Care Concept and Mawista are based on what are legally considered to be "travel health insurances" - but in general terms, they would fulfill § 195 Abs 3 VVG. Globality is a full fledged insurance, which comes in Germany with a 5-year limit and thus also falls under this legal rule

 

Chosing among them is based on what you need/want in coverage and what you can/want to pay for coverage.

 

Real Life: many an Ausländeramt, though, does not accept these insurances for handing out Visa/residence permit. Why that is the case? I don't know... You just have to be aware that your Visa might get rejected because the Ausländeramt deems your coverage with Mawista as insufficient/inadequate. If you then take a good lawyer specialized in Ausländerrecht, you'll most likely still get thru with this insurance, but it requires a fight.

 

And then there is the reaction of German health insurance companies later. If you have been, say, 3 years with MAWISTA and then get a job in Germany which requires German health insurance (public or private) chances are rather high, that your prior coverage from MAWISTA will initially not be accepted and you'll be asked to pay back-charges. This differs from case to case. It could happen - or not. You just need to be aware of this risk when you take it.

AFAIK, CareConcept has a deal with HanseMerkur that you can move over into one of the "normal" tariffs (more or less) at HanseMerkur health insurance when you move out from CareConcept. Globality has a similar deal with DKV. I do not know if MAWISTA has any such deal with any German insurance company or not - if they don't, it would be one good reason for me not to go with them but rather use one of the others.

 

An alternative can be going directly to an international health insurance that is recognized in Germany as substitutive insurance, for instance ALC or MorganPrice.

 

Cheerio

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Not sure whether or not the question as to what are the main differences between a regular and just a travel health insurance has been covered already. Anyway: in my view the main difference is that a travel insurance can refuse to renew the contract once it expires. This leaves you with the risk of being in need of cover because of intercurrent medical conditions and not being able to find an insurance which will accept you because of then preexisting conditions. And this is quite a serious risk, I´d say.

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There is a problem here between the legal side of things (which is pretty straight forward) and the reality of life in Germany, especially with regards to dealing with the Ausländeramt now and German insurance companies later.

Starshollow, many thanks for providing that clear and detailed picture.

 

I won’t inquire into the provenance of the ‘backdating penalty’ (though I’d love to know it), but am I correct that it doesn’t even go back into 'the system' -- i.e., it's neither paid to nor forwarded to the German government -- but is essentially just a giveaway to the private insurance companies?

 

I can’t even imagine this happening in the U.S., where corporate welfare is the norm.

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Steve: good evening! Again, the point is: it´s NOT only private insurance companies but PUBLIC companies which have to levy the stupid backpayments. The money ends up where ever it ends up - in stupid public and private health insurance accounts and the whole system is madness. Don´t even try to justify it :)

The Germans do some many things well but understanding foreigners coming here as freelancers, employees, students - whatever? They make life unnecessarily complicated.

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Hello!

 

I am writing this post just few hours before I go to the Ausländerbehörde, I hope someone can give me some advice!

 

We will go to apply for a residence permit for my husband (I am doing my PhD with scholarship here) and when looking for

a health insurance for him, I found mawista and chose mawista science for him, they send me all the documents by e-mail, but

then accidentally they told me he is not eligible for it since I am not insured by them (I have insurance from my home country, but

he could not get it yet since he was abroad all this time). So then the woman suggested the mawista reisecare, and said it will be ok

for the permit, but now that I read here I think maybe not? Because it is written it is a Reise-Krankversicherung.. Although they still

sent me a document where it is written zur vorlage bei der Ausländerbehörde. But I made it for 3 months since then he will can get the

home country one - and it is written "und besteht ununterbrochen". And it says the price is 44.80 for the first 12 months and then 72 something.

On this document though the word reise is not mentioned :D So, do you think this is ok to be shown?

Or, is it really possible to show the mawistascience one, since we have it, and I could not know in some sense that he cant actually have it?

I am really surprised how they give all this confirmations without even paying for it or showing the passport or something:)

 

Thanks for any help!!!

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@ SteveRay, my advice is to learn German asap. If you want to study something here you will need a C1 level, which can't be reached so fast. Even if you don't, my friendly advice for all those who move in a foreign country is to learn its basics even before arriving there. It will make your life a lot easier. @ Liss, the Reiseversicherung will maybe be ok for the Visum, I personally don't like the idea of keeping them for a long time because of the limited coverage (mainly only acute events, limited options if u have something cronic). But it is ok if he is in a good health condition and can get a better one after 3 months.

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Hello!

 

I am writing to enquire about health insurance at Germany. I am an non-EU citizen (Indian, Asia) and may be getting a postdoc offer at Bochum. I will be getting a scholarship around 2500 - 3000 euro. As I am married, I need health insurance for me and my wife. Is it possible to get public insurance although I am not a citizen of Germany. If we get public insurance, then my wife will be covered in that? Whether the public insurance will cover if we plan for baby? If we cannot get public insurance, then can we go for the private insurance? How much costly it will be? Is there any waiting period for the private/public insurance for maternity cover. Please help me in this regard and this will help me to decide our future course of action.

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