Cleaning a clogged bathtub

35 posts in this topic

Hi!

Yesterday I was cleaning my entire apartment and while doing so, I played around with this knob (please see attachment) and today morning after I had a shower, I realized that the water is completely clogged in the bathtub. I presume that this knob has nothing to do with clogging the bathtub but I just want to confirm it. As I am not sure about this function of the knob and since my houseowner is away in an country on a vacation, I wanted to seek your help on this forum.

 

Since the last few days even before I changed anything with the knob, I did have the problem of water being clogged in the bathtub for a few minutes after bath but today, water is still clogged even after 10-12 hours of shower. Is there any other method that I can follow to clear the clog?

 

All your suggestions/ ideas are appreciated.

Thanks!

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Jesus, can't you think for yourself.

Try searching the internet for a solution, like this. (I think the problem is caused by a knob, guess who?)

 

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Thanks for your reply. Please excuse my ignorance but the problem is that I need to drain the stagnant water in order to add soda/vinegar and unfortunately, I don't know how to do that. I did look up on youtube videos and searched on google for this but I did not get accurate results ( maybe because I did not search with the appropriate keywords)

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I'm not a plumber or qualified in any way, but why not try soaking up the water with a sponge and squeezing it into the bucket.

Then pour it down a different plughole.

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Have you checked that its not hair thats blocking the plug hole?

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OP, what YL6 mentions is absolutely true. I was cited for a over powered knob violation and had to do community service. It's not a pretty picture by any means. Call a plumber.

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I was cited for a over powered knob violation

 

that's another problem :P

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Thanks for all your replies and I had a good laugh at some of the funny replies:-)

For now, I removed all the stagnant water and I need to head to the supermarket tomorrow to get some baking soda to unclog the bathtub. Hopefully, it solves the problem and if not then I might have to call the plumber.

 

On another note, I have not yet actually understood the purpose of the knob in the kitchen and if possible, I would like to know its purpose.

 

Thank you all once again!

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party pooper

 

an oldie but a goodie....and where is he suppose (d) to get Drano on a Sunday?!

 

 

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Get Drano at the most convenient drugstore (Drogeriemarkt).

 

Törchen, did I say "today"? No, I very cleverly avoided any time reference, nor did I say "nearest" because it just might be closed when Hermes flies by - no, I said "most convenient". 30+ years in a law firm do show at times.

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On another note, I have not yet actually understood the purpose of the knob in the kitchen and if possible, I would like to know its purpose.

 

The vital clue to the purpose of 'the knob' (which you have been studiously overlooking) is to be found directly beneath it. That big chrome-ringed glass plate with counters and numbers is your flat's (local consumer) water-meter. The knob or input valve is there so that your flat's plumbing system can be isolated from the mains to allow for repairs or alterations to locally installed items such as washers, dishwashers, shower-heads, leaking tap washers, etc..

 

If you turn on one of your kitchen's cold taps (faucets)* you should be able to observe some activity amongst the water-meter's dials and counters. If you then turn that knob all the way to the right you should notice that the water ceases to flow from the tap and the meter's dials cease turning. Turning it almost (not fully tight as that can cause distortion of the seals) all the way back to the left should permit water to flow within your flat's local plumbing network at the highest safe working pressure.

 

2B

 

*Fawcet(t- Major) post-entry adjustment edit - thanks to TT3M reporter ;-)

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