Only in America...

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14 hours ago, Keleth said:

Am I the only one who finds it kind of strange that in Georgia I can buy an AR15 legally but if I give water to someone waiting in line to vote I could face charges.

GOP Cancel Culture cuts the Good Samaritan from the Bible in Georgia.

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Another one -

 

 
Quote

 

A man accused of shooting three people at a Maryland convenience store, killing two of them, also fatally shot his parents and set his apartment on fire before he shot and killed himself, police said.

Joshua Green, 27, was identified Sunday night as the suspect in the deadly shooting at a Royal Farms store in Essex, Baltimore County police said in a statement.

Police also believe Green shot and killed his parents who were found dead at their home in an unincorporated part of the county called Baldwin.

 

Detectives said Green left the convenience store and set his apartment on fire, according to the statement. He was later found dead of what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound. It was unclear when his parents died but police said both appeared to have been shot.

 

 

I was talking to a friend in the U.S. yesterday who told me that it is just second nature to be looking for escape routes in case shooting starts. Anywhere and everywhere. I can't imagine the stress of that.

 

 
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On 3/27/2021, 4:00:29, keith2011 said:

I sort of get it, maybe it would be just some free water but the danger is it could become a bottle of whiskey or a voucher for a nice meal in a restaurant etc. etc. and don't forget who gave it to you when you vote!

The problem is that no one is allowed to give them water.Charities,Churches etc they are all banned.

You point would stand if it was specifically limited to Political parties.

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17 minutes ago, Keleth said:

The problem is that no one is allowed to give them water.Charities,Churches etc they are all banned.

 

I don't understand why everyone is focusing on not being able to provide refreshments to voters standing in line and not why voters need refreshments when standing in line?!?!:blink:

 

Am I the only one who thinks a system that requires voters to stand in line for hours to exercise their right to vote fundamentally flawed?

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

a system that requires voters to stand in line for hours to exercise their right to vote fundamentally flawed

 

Yes, is flawed. However, now the Trumpers want to reign in mail in and absentee ballot voting. Plus remove ballot boxes in "certain" areas. Seems to me that will make the lines even longer. Hopefully, it won't discourage "certain" people from voting like they hope it will.

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

I don't understand why everyone is focusing on not being able to provide refreshments to voters standing in line and not why voters need refreshments when standing in line?!?!:blink:

 

Am I the only one who thinks a system that requires voters to stand in line for hours to exercise their right to vote fundamentally flawed?

I also don’t understand why people can’t bring their own refreshments. Or is that somehow illegal?

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

I don't understand why everyone is focusing on not being able to provide refreshments to voters standing in line and not why voters need refreshments when standing in line?!?!:blink:

 

Am I the only one who thinks a system that requires voters to stand in line for hours to exercise their right to vote fundamentally flawed?


America truly is a rotten little fiefdom.

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

I don't understand why everyone is focusing on not being able to provide refreshments to voters standing in line and not why voters need refreshments when standing in line?!?!:blink:

 

Am I the only one who thinks a system that requires voters to stand in line for hours to exercise their right to vote fundamentally flawed?

Correct. If they want to fix it, they need at least a national ID card. And they won't.

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Surely you just need more voting stations?

 

The UK has no ID card, and little queuing to vote. I have voted in a church, in a mountain rescue centre and in a school in the UK, at various times. There's always some neutral ground available. 

 

I honestly assumed there was some requirement for x voting stations for y voters which 'everyone' did, having only voted here in DE and in the UK. That last US election was a completely bizarre thing to witness on multiple levels. 

 

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55 minutes ago, kiplette said:

Surely you just need more voting stations?

 

The UK has no ID card, and little queuing to vote. I have voted in a church, in a mountain rescue centre and in a school in the UK, at various times. There's always some neutral ground available. 

 

I honestly assumed there was some requirement for x voting stations for y voters which 'everyone' did, having only voted here in DE and in the UK. That last US election was a completely bizarre thing to witness on multiple levels. 

 

 

The demand for ID is inherently racist, which is why it is a preserve of the ... well, you know. Voter fraud is ridiculously rare and has never affected the outcome of any election, AFAIK. 

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That isn't so much what we were on - it's the ridiculous queuing - which I would think you can solve with more polling stations.

 

ID is not inherently racist.

 

It works against those who have a reason to hide their identity for whatever purpose. There are many and varied reasons for wanting to do that. 

 

 

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47 minutes ago, kiplette said:

That isn't so much what we were on - it's the ridiculous queuing - which I would think you can solve with more polling stations.

 

ID is not inherently racist.

 

It works against those who have a reason to hide their identity for whatever purpose. There are many and varied reasons for wanting to do that. 

 

 

 

It is in America, because it has its roots in intentional disenfranchisement. 

 

Quote

 

 

Voter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year. New research from the University of California San Diego provides evidence that voter ID laws disproportionately reduce voter turnout in more racially diverse areas. As a result, the voices of racial minorities become more muted and the relative influence of white America grows.

In a study published in the journal Politics, Groups, and Identities, researchers focused on turnout changes across the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections in states that had recently passed strict photo voter ID laws: Alabama, Mississippi, Virginia and Wisconsin and compared those changes to other states with similar racial compositions that had not passed laws. They found the turnout gap between white counties and racially diverse counties grew more within states enacting new strict photo ID laws.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-06/uoc--vil062420.php

 

The GOP aren't concerned about preventing nonexistent voter fraud. They're concerned with making it more difficult for minorities to vote so that situations like Georgia going blue don't become the norm.

 

Voter ID laws have underlying racial biases and prevent minorities from engaging in active democratic participation. These requirements compel an individual to present his or her ID in order to cast a ballot on Election Day. Obtaining an ID can be costly and requires an individual’s birth certificate, which may be burdensome. Proponents advocate for the law under the guise of preventing voter fraud and ensuring that only voter-eligible citizens partake in elections; however, individuals who lack government-issued identification are more likely to be younger, less educated, and impoverished, and—most notably—nonwhite. An example of the inherent discrimination of voter ID laws can be found in the implementation of Georgia’s “exact match” system. This program requires an individual’s voting status to be suspended if the name on their driver’s license or Social Security records does not exactly match the name they inputted on their voter registration form. Of the 51,000 individuals that this law affected in 2018, 80 percent of them were African American. There is evidence that the “exact match” law played a role in the 2018 Georgia gubernatorial election, as African American candidate Stacey Abrams lost by approximately 55,000 votes. 

 

https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/publications/human_rights_magazine_home/voting-in-2020/why-minority-voters-have-a-lower-voter-turnout/

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2 hours ago, kiplette said:

Surely you just need more voting stations?

From afar, what I read the main problem, both in voting stations and by mail, is the time it takes to autenticate the person.

 

Quote

The UK has no ID card, and little queuing to vote. I have voted in a church, in a mountain rescue centre and in a school in the UK, at various times. There's always some neutral ground available. 

Which means do you have to prove your identity in UK? As diverse as in US?

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9 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

Which means do you have to prove your identity in UK? As diverse as in US?

 

https://www.electoral-reform.org.uk/campaigns/upgrading-our-democracy/voter-id/

 

A barrier to democracy

There’s evidence that strict voter ID rules in the USA disproportionately disadvantage already marginalised groups. Why? Unlike in mainland Europe where everyone has a mandatory national ID card, in the UK and USA the richer you are the more likely you have ID. Many citizens who can’t afford to go on foreign holidays don’t have passports, and those that can’t drive don’t have driving licences.

Here in the UK, 3.5 million citizens do not have access to photo ID and 11 million citizens do not have a passport or driving licence – research from 2019 estimated that 1.3 million people in the UK do not even have a bank account. That makes mandatory voter ID – with no free provision – a barrier to many people exercising their right to vote.

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21 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

From afar, what I read the main problem, both in voting stations and by mail, is the time it takes to autenticate the person.

 

Which means do you have to prove your identity in UK? As diverse as in US?

I am an old bastard! When I was living in the US in the 70s, I would often be asked for a State driving licence as proof of identity - but I didn’t have one. I had only a British passport- and that was usually rejected as proof of identity!😂

 

It also used to be funny in Spanish pensiones in the 80s when I had to show my passport to check in for the night somewhere. It always ended up being “ Irlanda del Norte “ on their check in booklet😂 as my nationality!

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1 hour ago, MikeMelga said:

Which means do you have to prove your identity in UK? As diverse as in US?

 

'If you live in England, Wales or Scotland you do not need to bring any identification to vote.' - from gov.uk

 

You need to be registered (on the electoral register) and you will get a card in the post telling you which polling station to go to - you don't even need that card to vote - you turn up, give your name and address, and get given your ballot paper. I have a postal vote based on my last location where I voted in person.

 

So in fact in the UK, it's bound to be quicker because there's no ID involved. 

 

It is made pretty easy for people, but even so, turnout is usually a bit crap. The Archbishop of York had a huge drive a number of years ago which did make some difference, but voter lethargy is a big problem in the UK. Much bigger than voter fraud, which is a thing, but AFAIK not seen as a massive issue.

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