Only in America...

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Why even get a cat in the first place is what I'd like to know. The same for people who crop dogs' tails and ears.

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1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

 The same for people who crop dogs' tails and ears.

 

 

Historically it's Terriers that had their tails cropped to prevent injury and infection when hunting. The theory being that he tail would get ripped to bits when the dog went through Brambles and Hedges. It's still legal in the UK but banned in Germany, our dog had his tail removed in Spain and we believed he was originally used for hunting.

 

As for ears, that's barbaric and vanity knows no bounds.

 

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3 hours ago, fraufruit said:

Why even get a cat in the first place is what I'd like to know. The same for people who crop dogs' tails and ears.

 

Our dog was born with one of those bulldog crinkle tails. I cannot get those words out fast enough to horrified Germans who think I had him docked. I even offer to let them examine it if they get particularly upset.

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America fighting against the rest of the world over metrification.

 

https://www.newsweek.com/fox-tucker-carlson-attacks-metric-system-1442485

 

Tucker Carlson says;

"Almost every nation on Earth has fallen under the yoke of tyranny—the metric system," Carlson said. "From Beijing to Buenos Aires, from Lusaka to London, the people of the world have been forced to measure their environment in millimeters and kilograms. "The United States is the only major country that has resisted, but we have no reason to be ashamed for using feet and pounds."

"It's totally made up,"  he says. (Isn't everything?)

"It connects us to our ancestors".  (So why not bring back measles, smallpox and slavery if you're that keen on living in the past).

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3 minutes ago, hooperski said:

"It connects us to our ancestors".  (So why not bring back measles, smallpox and slavery if you're that keen on living in the past).

 

and witch-burning!

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The UK, for the most part, still uses the imperial system.  It's very much lbs, ozs and miles over there.

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The only imperial relic in the UK these days is the belief of rich over poor, otherwise lbs and ounces, pounds shillings and pence are long gone.

You will hear people in pubs ask for a pint, but it's 0.473 of a litre. Petrol and diesel are sold in litres.

The only imperial measurement that we cling on to is measuring distance on our roads in miles.

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I can only go by my own experience, and when I'm over there and visit markets, the weights are often in pounds and ounces, or in both systems, and the distances are in miles, neither of which you will find in Ireland.

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21 minutes ago, Tap said:

The UK, for the most part, still uses the imperial system.  It's very much lbs, ozs and miles over there.

 

and in stones. I’ve had the same experience. 

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I still use „ stone „ as a weight but I have never used the plural form : ie, with an „s“ at the end!

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22 minutes ago, Tap said:

The UK, for the most part, still uses the imperial system.  It's very much lbs, ozs and miles over there.

 

Nah, miles and pints for distance and beer respectively, and people tend to be weighed in stone but everything else has been kg and litres for at least 2 or 3 decades.  Same with farenheit, Im in my 40s and Im pretty sure have never used Farenheit for anything.

 

The only thing I have *ever* heard of being measured in ounces is weed.

 

Edit, oh well, I guess diamonds are still measured in carrots(carets?) and horses in hands.  

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metre_Convention

 

The Metre Convention (French: Convention du Mètre), also known as the Treaty of the Metre,[1] is an international treaty that was signed in Paris on 20 May 1875 by representatives of 17 nations (Argentina, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden and Norway, Switzerland, Ottoman Empire, United States of America, and Venezuela).

 

So, the USA were a member of the Metre Convention, but did not introduced it in the US.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_(unit)

 

Since the International Yard and Pound Agreement of 1959, one foot is defined as 0.3048 meter exactly.

 

Funny, that even the foot is defined using the meter in Paris.

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1 minute ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

one foot is defined as 0.3048 meter exactly.

 

This is how all the brits I know, even my parents tend to view things: relative to proper units. A foot is about a third of a meter, a pint is about half a litre as is a pound half a kilo.  A chain is something like half the wicket in a game of cricket, I think? Things like furlongs, grains, bushels, quarts (2 pints?), not a clue.  A gallon is what petrol used to be measured in, but I dont know what one is.  Even things like stone that are used quite a lot -- ask me how many ounces in a pound and how many pounds in a stone, erm...  I think its 14 and 16 but Im not sure which way around.

 

We use ton metaphorically to mean "heavy", but I dont know what a ton is.  All I know is that it isnt a tonne.  If I had to guess Id say a ton is some silly multiple of a hundredweight (3 of them maybe?), hundredweight being my favourite daft unit as it is in fact not a hundred of anything. 

 

Oh and a yard is a meter, I know that. And a mile is longer on a boat than it is for a car. And an american pint is smaller than a british one, which is maybe why their beer is stronger?

 

And as I said, Im in my 40s.  I cannot believe that the youth of today are any more at home with imperial (as we used to call it) than they are with pounds shillings and pence (oddly abbreviated to lsd).

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You forget, an American gallon is less than a UK one.

A foot is 1/3 of a yard and a Metre is 3.28 feet. A nautical mile is called a Knot and that is 1.15 miles.

A cricket pitch is 22 yards which is the length of a chain and there are 10 chains to a furlong. A chain was a measurment used for Surveying because it would not stretch unlike rope. A lot of measurements are I believe based on farming, e.g how much land a farmer with a plough could plough in one day but I can't confirm that.

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A nautical mile is 1852 metres.

A knot is a measurement of speed :

1 nautical mile per hour.

 

I'll leave rods, poles and perches to someone else...

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One thing that really surprises me is that the Brexit fanatics haven't promised to do away with all that evil metric road signage, like America is consecutively doing after its brief experiment with both measures in the 1970s. It will go great with those blue passports.

 

42 minutes ago, HH_Sailor said:

I'll leave rods, poles and perches to someone else...

 

Simpsons did it:

5d0532aacba99_my-car-gets1.jpg.04fe18759

 

 

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As far as I can remember at the market in Harburg, the tradespeople always told me the price of a " Pfund Tomaten." And my last time there was only 5 years ago...

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7 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

 

This is how all the brits I know, even my parents tend to view things: relative to proper units. A foot is about a third of a meter, a pint is about half a litre as is a pound half a kilo.  A chain is something like half the wicket in a game of cricket, I think? Things like furlongs, grains, bushels, quarts (2 pints?), not a clue.  A gallon is what petrol used to be measured in, but I dont know what one is.  Even things like stone that are used quite a lot -- ask me how many ounces in a pound and how many pounds in a stone, erm...  I think its 14 and 16 but Im not sure which way around.

 

We use ton metaphorically to mean "heavy", but I dont know what a ton is.  All I know is that it isnt a tonne.  If I had to guess Id say a ton is some silly multiple of a hundredweight (3 of them maybe?), hundredweight being my favourite daft unit as it is in fact not a hundred of anything. 

 

Oh and a yard is a meter, I know that. And a mile is longer on a boat than it is for a car. And an american pint is smaller than a british one, which is maybe why their beer is stronger?

 

And as I said, Im in my 40s.  I cannot believe that the youth of today are any more at home with imperial (as we used to call it) than they are with pounds shillings and pence (oddly abbreviated to lsd).

Dear zwiebelfisch: I remember all of those things , :lol:and, being of a hippy persuasion at a less ( or more?) advanced stage of my life, LSD was a proper currency back then!

 

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